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Design of Pneumatically Actuated Torsional Loading for High Strain Rate Testing

Description

In real world applications, materials undergo a simultaneous combination of tension, compression, and torsion as a result of high velocity impact. The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) is an effective tool for analyzing stress-strain response of materials at high strain

In real world applications, materials undergo a simultaneous combination of tension, compression, and torsion as a result of high velocity impact. The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) is an effective tool for analyzing stress-strain response of materials at high strain rates but currently little can be done to produce a synchronized combination of these varying impacts. This research focuses on fabricating a flange which will be mounted on the incident bar of a SHPB and struck perpendicularly by a pneumatically driven striker thus allowing for torsion without interfering with the simultaneous compression or tension. Analytical calculations are done to determine size specifications of the flange to protect against yielding or failure. Based on these results and other design considerations, the flange and a complementary incident bar are created. Timing can then be established such that the waves impact the specimen at the same time causing simultaneous loading of a specimen. This thesis allows research at Arizona State University to individually incorporate all uniaxial deformation modes (tension, compression, and torsion) at high strain rates as well as combining either of the first two modes with torsion. Introduction of torsion will expand the testing capabilities of the SHPB at ASU and allow for more in depth analysis of the mechanical behavior of materials under impact loading. Combining torsion with tension or compression will promote analysis of a material's adherence to the Von Mises failure criterion. This greater understanding of material behavior can be implemented into models and simulations thereby improving the accuracy with which engineers can design new structures.

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Date Created
2016-05

Energy Absorption Properties of Standard and Origami-Inspired Honeycomb Structures

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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2.5mm Origami ABS

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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2.5mm Origami TPU

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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2mm Honeycomb ABS

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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2mm Honeycomb TPU

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

164278-Thumbnail Image.png

2mm Origami ABS

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

164279-Thumbnail Image.png

2mm Origami TPU

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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3mm Honeycomb ABS

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

164281-Thumbnail Image.png

3mm Honeycomb TPU

Description

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was

The goal of this experiment was to examine the energy absorption properties of origami-inspired honeycomb and standard honeycomb structures. These structures were 3D printed with two different materials: thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Quasi-static compression testing was performed on these structures for both types and materials at various wall thicknesses. The energy absorption and other material properties were analyzed for each structure. Overall, the results indicate that origami-inspired structures perform best at energy absorption at a higher wall thickness with a rigid material. The results also indicated that standard honeycomb structures perform better with lower wall thickness, and also perform better with a rigid, rather than a flexible material. Additionally, it was observed that a flexible material, like TPU, better demonstrates the folding and recovery properties of origami-inspired structures. The results of this experiment have applications wherever honeycomb structures are used, mostly on aircraft and spacecraft. In vehicles with structures of a sufficiently high wall thickness with a rigid material, origami-inspired honeycomb structures could be used instead of current honeycomb structures in order to better protect the passengers or payload through improved energy absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05