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Manuel M. Ponce's Suite in D major for solo guitar: performance edition and analysis

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Whenever a text is transmitted, or communicated by any means, variations may occur because editors, copyists, and performers are often not careful enough with the source itself. As a result, a flawed text may come to be accepted in good

Whenever a text is transmitted, or communicated by any means, variations may occur because editors, copyists, and performers are often not careful enough with the source itself. As a result, a flawed text may come to be accepted in good faith through repetition, and may often be preferred over the authentic version because familiarity with the flawed copy has been established. This is certainly the case with regard to Manuel M. Ponce's guitar editions. An inexact edition of a musical work is detrimental to several key components of its performance: musical interpretation, aesthetics, and the original musical concept of the composer. These phenomena may be seen in the case of Manuel Ponce's Suite in D Major for guitar. The single published edition by Peer International Corporation in 1967 with the revision and fingering of Manuel López Ramos contains many copying mistakes and intentional, but unauthorized, changes to the original composition. For the present project, the present writer was able to obtain a little-known copy of the original manuscript of this work, and to document these discrepancies in order to produce a new performance edition that is more closely based on Ponce's original work.

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2013

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The influence of folk music in guitar compositions by Manuel Ponce

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The purpose of this project is to explore the influence of folk music in guitar compositions by Manuel Ponce from 1923 to 1932. It focuses on his Tres canciones populares mexicanas and Tropico and Rumba.

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Date Created
2014

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Understanding the emerging behaviors and demands for the colony success of social insects: a mathematical approach

Description

The most advanced social insects, the eusocial insects, form often large societies in which there is reproductive division of labor, queens and workers, have overlapping generations, and cooperative brood care where daughter workers remain in the nest with their queen

The most advanced social insects, the eusocial insects, form often large societies in which there is reproductive division of labor, queens and workers, have overlapping generations, and cooperative brood care where daughter workers remain in the nest with their queen mother and care for their siblings. The eusocial insects are composed of representative species of bees and wasps, and all species of ants and termites. Much is known about their organizational structure, but remains to be discovered.

The success of social insects is dependent upon cooperative behavior and adaptive strategies shaped by natural selection that respond to internal or external conditions. The objective of my research was to investigate specific mechanisms that have helped shaped the structure of division of labor observed in social insect colonies, including age polyethism and nutrition, and phenomena known to increase colony survival such as egg cannibalism. I developed various Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) models in which I applied dynamical, bifurcation, and sensitivity analysis to carefully study and visualize biological outcomes in social organisms to answer questions regarding the conditions under which a colony can survive. First, I investigated how the population and evolutionary dynamics of egg cannibalism and division of labor can promote colony survival. I then introduced a model of social conflict behavior to study the inclusion of different response functions that explore the benefits of cannibalistic behavior and how it contributes to age polyethism, the change in behavior of workers as they age, and its biological relevance. Finally, I introduced a model to investigate the importance of pollen nutritional status in a honeybee colony, how it affects population growth and influences division of labor within the worker caste. My results first reveal that both cannibalism and division of labor are adaptive strategies that increase the size of the worker population, and therefore, the persistence of the colony. I show the importance of food collection, consumption, and processing rates to promote good colony nutrition leading to the coexistence of brood and adult workers. Lastly, I show how taking into account seasonality for pollen collection improves the prediction of long term consequences.

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Date Created
2018

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Immunological and gene regulatory functions of the protein vitellogenin in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

Description

Vitellogenin (Vg) is an ancient and highly conserved multifunctional protein. It is primarily known for its role in egg-yolk formation but also serves functions pertaining to immunity, longevity, nutrient storage, and oxidative stress relief. In the honey bee (Apis mellifera),

Vitellogenin (Vg) is an ancient and highly conserved multifunctional protein. It is primarily known for its role in egg-yolk formation but also serves functions pertaining to immunity, longevity, nutrient storage, and oxidative stress relief. In the honey bee (Apis mellifera), Vg has evolved still further to include important social functions that are critical to the maintenance and proliferation of colonies. Here, Vg is used to synthesize royal jelly, a glandular secretion produced by a subset of the worker caste that is fed to the queen and young larvae and which is essential for caste development and social immunity. Moreover, Vg in the worker caste sets the pace of their behavioral development as they transition between different tasks throughout their life. In this dissertation, I make several new discoveries about Vg functionality. First, I uncover a colony-level immune pathway in bees that uses royal jelly as a vehicle to transfer pathogen fragments between nestmates. Second, I show that Vg is localized and expressed in the honey bee digestive tract and suggest possible immunological functions it may be performing there. Finally, I show that Vg enters to nucleus and binds to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), acting as a potential transcription factor to regulate expression of many genes pertaining to behavior, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. These findings represent a significant advance in the understanding of Vg functionality and honey bee biology, and set the stage for many future avenues of research.

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2019