Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

135244-Thumbnail Image.png

The Effects of Material and Surface Properties on the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcal Biofilms

Description

Biofilm derived orthopedic infections are increasingly common after contamination of an open bone fracture or the surgical site pre- and post-orthopedic prosthetic insertion or removal. These infections are usually difficult to eradicate due to the resistant nature of biofilms to

Biofilm derived orthopedic infections are increasingly common after contamination of an open bone fracture or the surgical site pre- and post-orthopedic prosthetic insertion or removal. These infections are usually difficult to eradicate due to the resistant nature of biofilms to antimicrobial therapy. Difficulty of treatment of biofilm derived infections is also partly due to the presence of persister cells in the biofilm matrix. Persister cells are tolerant to antimicrobial therapy delivered via the systemic route. It is thus possible for these cells to repopulate their environment once systemic antimicrobial delivery is discontinued. The antimicrobial concentration required to eradicate bacterial biofilms, minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC), can be determined in vitro by exposing biofilms to different regimens of antimicrobial solutions. Previous studies have demonstrated that values of the MBEC vary depending on the material and surface the biofilm grows on. This study investigated the relationship between antimicrobial susceptibility and antimicrobial exposure time, and the effects of surface material type on the antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococcal biofilms. It was concluded that antimicrobial susceptibility increases with increased antimicrobial exposure time, and that the investigated surface and material properties did not have an effect on the susceptibility of staphylococcal biofilms to antimicrobial therapy. Further investigation is however necessary to confirm these results due to some inconsistent data obtained over the course of the trials.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

137550-Thumbnail Image.png

The Characterization and Development of Methylcellulose in Hydrogels

Description

This report provides information concerning qualities of methylcellulose and how those properties affect further experimentation within the biomedical world. Utilizing the compound’s biocompatibility many issues, ranging from surgical to cosmetic, can be solved. As of recent, studies indicate,

This report provides information concerning qualities of methylcellulose and how those properties affect further experimentation within the biomedical world. Utilizing the compound’s biocompatibility many issues, ranging from surgical to cosmetic, can be solved. As of recent, studies indicate, methylcellulose has been used as a physically cross-linked gel, which cannot sustain a solid form within the body. Therefore, this report will ultimately explore the means of creating a non-degradable, injectable, chemically cross-linking methylcellulose- based hydrogel. Methylcellulose will be evaluated and altered in experiments conducted within this report and a chemical cross-linker, developed from Jeffamine ED 2003 (O,O′-Bis(2-aminopropyl) polypropylene glycol-block-polyethylene glycol-block-polypropylene glycol), will be created. Experimentation with these elements is outlined here, and will ultimately prompt future revisions and analysis.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05