Matching Items (4)

135164-Thumbnail Image.png

Factors that Contribute Toward Volunteer Satisfaction and Retention Rate of Alas de Amor: A Collaboration Between Alas de Amor and the C.A.R.E. Program

Description

Alas de Amor is a fairly new organization whose most significant need right now is to grow in numbers and remain growing. This growth is important to the organization because

Alas de Amor is a fairly new organization whose most significant need right now is to grow in numbers and remain growing. This growth is important to the organization because it will allow them to not only treat and see more patients while in Mexico, but it will also benefit the organization in terms of presence in the Phoenix area and general knowledge of the organization. Volunteers are in some ways are unpaid marketing tools because they tell their peers about the experiences they have and encourage those they know to join the cause as well ("Why Involve Volunteers?," n.d.). As demonstrated through prior research on volunteering, volunteer motivations and satisfaction play an important role in retaining volunteers. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the motivations, satisfaction, and likelihood of continuation in volunteering for the individuals who have served as volunteers at Alas de Amor within the past year.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

135192-Thumbnail Image.png

Development of a Plan to Strengthen Volunteer Recruitment, Satisfaction, and Retention at Project CURE

Description

Volunteer motivation and satisfaction were assessed at Project CURE, a nonprofit that collects, sorts, tests, and ships donated medical supplies and equipment to healthcare facilities in developing countries. This research

Volunteer motivation and satisfaction were assessed at Project CURE, a nonprofit that collects, sorts, tests, and ships donated medical supplies and equipment to healthcare facilities in developing countries. This research was the result of a yearlong partnership between the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) program and Project CURE. Volunteers at Project CURE were surveyed (N=147) after completing a volunteer session to assess their motivation for volunteering, satisfaction with their experience, and any recommendations they had for improving the volunteer program. Five categories of motivating factors were assessed and it was found that the Values and Understanding categories were the strongest motivating factors. Overall, volunteers rated their experience highly, but the results indicated a number of small changes that Project CURE could make to better meet volunteers' needs, and better communicate the impact of volunteers' work, which could pave the way to increases in the numbers of volunteer hours Project CURE receives and increased quality of volunteer work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

135697-Thumbnail Image.png

ASSESSING VOLUNTEER MOTIVATION AND SATISFACTION: A COLLABORATION BETWEEN SINGLETON MOMS AND THE COMMUNITY ACTION RESEARCH EXPERIENCES (CARE) PROGRAM

Description

The Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) program collaborated with Singleton Moms, a local non-profit organization that provides financial, psychological, and social support services to single parents with cancer. The purpose

The Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) program collaborated with Singleton Moms, a local non-profit organization that provides financial, psychological, and social support services to single parents with cancer. The purpose of this action research project was to assess the volunteer program at Singleton Moms. Both past and present Singleton Moms' volunteers (N = 123; 87.0% female) completed an online survey assessing their motivation for volunteering and their satisfaction with the organization. A mixed ANOVA was conducted to identify the most important motivation and satisfaction domains and to see if the findings depended on whether the volunteers were current or past volunteers. For the motivation assessment, results indicated that the volunteers rate the cancer specific and moral/human kindness domains as the strongest reasons for motivating them to volunteer at Singleton Moms. In addition, results revealed that the social connection motivation domain was the only domain with differences between the ratings of the past and present volunteers. For the satisfaction assessment, results indicated that the volunteers rate the organizational climate domain as the most fulfilled area of satisfaction within the Singleton Moms' volunteer program. It was also revealed that there were no significant differences between the ratings of the past and present volunteers among all satisfaction domains. Both the quantitative and qualitative findings suggest that Singleton Moms' implications for action may include: 1) a volunteer database audit, 2) streamlining communications, 3) variability in volunteer times, and 4) bolstering volunteer motivation. Implementing some of these actions may help Singleton Moms increase volunteer motivation and satisfaction and thus create a more effective volunteer program. Ultimately, this may encourage volunteers to continue their services at Singleton Moms and thus help Singleton Moms expand their support programs and assist additional families.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

135698-Thumbnail Image.png

Modeling SDF-1α Chemotactic Gradient Formation After Traumatic Brain Injury

Description

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of injury related death in the United States. The complexity of the injury environment that follows TBI creates an incomplete understanding of

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of injury related death in the United States. The complexity of the injury environment that follows TBI creates an incomplete understanding of all the mechanisms in place to regulate chemotactic responses to TBI. The goal of this project was to develop a predictive in silco model using diffusion and autocrine/paracrine signaling specific to stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) gradient formation after TBI and compare this model with in vivo experimental data. A COMSOL model using Fickian diffusion and autocrine/paracrine reaction terms was generated to predict the gradient formation observed in vivo at three physiologically relevant time points (1, 3, and 7 days). In vivo data was gathered and analyzed via immunohistochemistry and MATLAB. The spatial distribution of SDF-1α concentration in vivo more consistently demonstrated patterns similar to the in silico model dependent on both diffusion and autocrine/paracrine reaction terms rather than diffusion alone. The temporal distribution of these same results demonstrated degradation of SDF-1α at too rapid a rate, compared to the in vivo results. To account for differences in behavior observed in vivo, reaction terms and constants of 1st-order reaction rates must be modulated to better reflect the results observed in vivo. These results from both the in silico model and in vivo data support the hypothesis that SDF-1α gradient formation after TBI depends on more than diffusion alone. Future work will focus on improving the model with constants that are specific to SDF-1α as well as testing methods to better control the degradation of SDF-1α.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05