Matching Items (4)

135122-Thumbnail Image.png

Bitcoin: How Benefit and Cost Shape The Adoption of Virtual Currency

Description

Bitcoin is a form of virtual currency that can be used as a medium of exchange for goods or services. Different from other forms of virtual payment, bitcoin is de-centralized

Bitcoin is a form of virtual currency that can be used as a medium of exchange for goods or services. Different from other forms of virtual payment, bitcoin is de-centralized and puts all of the power in the hands of the user, rather than a banking institution. However, bitcoin's ability to develop as a renowned medium of exchange has been impeded, potentially due to a lack of knowledge, active bitcoin platforms, and support. In this paper, I conduct a survey to understand factors that affect households' adoption of bitcoin. In particular, I focus on factors that capture the potential benefit and cost of adopting bitcoin. Through a public survey, participants are asked a series of questions on their willingness to adopt bitcoin. I found significant results stating that subjects were more inclined toward bitcoin contingent upon the number of platforms accepting it, the number of acquaintances using bitcoin, and the degree of personal knowledge participants have about bitcoin. These findings suggest that perceived benefit captured by network effect and convenience of use, as well as the potential cost captured by uncertainty help shape the adoption of bitcoin.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

157272-Thumbnail Image.png

Understanding and predicting activist intentions: an extension of the theory of planned behavior

Description

Despite the societal importance of activism, the understanding of activist intentions remained limited (Liebert, Leve, & Hu, 2011; Klar & Kasser, 2009). The current study used the Theory of

Despite the societal importance of activism, the understanding of activist intentions remained limited (Liebert, Leve, & Hu, 2011; Klar & Kasser, 2009). The current study used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to examine two structural models of low-risk activist intentions and high-risk activist intentions (Ajzen, 1991). The traditional TPB model was tested against a hybrid commitment model that also assessed past activist behaviors and activist identity. Participants (N = 383) were recruited through social media, professional list-serves, and word of mouth. Results indicated a good model fit for both the traditional TPB model (CFI = .98; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .03; χ2(120) = 3760.62, p < .01) and the commitment model (CFI = .97; RMSEA = .05; SRMR = .04; χ2(325) = 7848.07, p < .01). The commitment model accounted for notably more variance in both low-risk activist intentions (78.9% in comparison to 26.5% for the traditional TPB model) and high-risk activist intentions (58.9% in comparison to 11.2% for the traditional TPB model). Despite this, the traditional TPB model was deemed the better model as the higher variance explained in the commitment model was almost entirely due to the inclusion of past low-risk activist behaviors and past high-risk activist behaviors. A post-hoc analysis that incorporated sexual orientation and religious affiliation as covariates into the traditional model also led to a good-fitting model (CFI = .98; RMSEA = .04; SRMR = .04; χ2(127) = 217.18, p < .01) and accounted for increased variance in low-risk activist intentions (29.7%) and high-risk activist intentions (18.7%) compared to the traditional model. The merits of each of the structural models and the practical implications for practice and research were discussed

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

157417-Thumbnail Image.png

A Cross-Sectional Examination of the Relationship Between Trait Mindfulness, Behavioral Regulation Toward Exercise, Exercise Intention, Perceived Stress, and Physical Activity in University Undergraduates

Description

Physical inactivity is a continuing public health crisis because of its negative effects on health (e.g. hypertension, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes). To combat the rising prevalence of these non-communicable

Physical inactivity is a continuing public health crisis because of its negative effects on health (e.g. hypertension, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes). To combat the rising prevalence of these non-communicable diseases, physical activity (PA) promotion is a public health priority. However, current programs seem to be ineffective in the long-term promotion of PA. Resultingly new, effective interventions are needed. Recent studies have established a link between mindfulness and PA engagement. Based on the current literature, the present study sought to investigate the associations between trait mindfulness, behavioral regulation towards exercise, exercise intention, stress, and self-reported PA. This study also examined whether trait mindfulness was independently associated with meeting weekly, leisure-time, moderate-to-vigorous PA [MVPA] recommendations in university undergraduate students after controlling for demographic characteristics, past PA experience, exercise intention, stress, and motivation.

The study used a cross-sectional design and participants consisted of 180 undergraduate university students (aged 18 to 24 years). Participants completed a one-time survey that assessed demographic characteristics, trait mindfulness, behavioral regulation toward exercise, exercise intention, perceived stress and PA. Bivariate associations between the variables were assessed with Pearson or Spearman correlations. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine which variables were independently associated with meeting weekly, leisure-time MVPA guidelines. Results of this study found weak positive associations between the mindfulness domain of acceptance and leisure time MVPA ( = .168, p < .05), no associations between mindfulness and transportation PA, and negative associations between mindfulness (MAAS,  = –.238, p < .01; acceptance,  = –.175, p < .05) and sitting time. Results of logistic regression found that only relative autonomy (OR = 1.085, 95% CI [1.008, 1.168], p = .030) and intention (OR = 2.193, 95% CI [1.533, 3.138], p < .0001) were independently associated with meeting weekly, leisure- time MVPA recommendations. The results of this study show that while there is only a weak direct relationship between trait mindfulness and PA, mindfulness may be related with other factors associated with PA. More research is needed in order to better understand the potential mechanisms behind the results found in this, and past, studies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

149855-Thumbnail Image.png

Effects of attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and bike rodeo participation on Intention to bike safely

Description

Thousands of children are being injured every day in bicycling accidents. Interventions, like Safe Routes to School, are currently in place to combat injury rates by providing programs to

Thousands of children are being injured every day in bicycling accidents. Interventions, like Safe Routes to School, are currently in place to combat injury rates by providing programs to teach children safe biking behaviors. In order to develop effective behavioral change programs, behavior and the components of which it is composed must be understood. Attitudes, subjective norms, and self-efficacy are important predictors of intention to perform a behavior. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the extent to which attitude, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and bike rodeo participation explain third through eighth graders' intentions to bike safely. These constructs were tested using a survey research design in a purposive sample of fifty-seven third through eighth grade students in Safe Routes to School schools in the Southwest. Students took an online survey in the computer lab at their respective schools supervised by a teacher. The study found attitudes to be comprised of three factors: happy/safe, not afraid, and calm. Overall, the model explained approximately 71% of the variance in children's intentions to bike safely, R2=.749, Adjusted R2=.713, F(7, 49)=20.854, p<.01. The significant predictors were happy/safe attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and a quadratic self-efficacy term explaining 10% (p=.019), 28% (p<.01), 18% (p<.01), and 15% (p<.01) respectively. The results of the study can be used to create future and improve current bike safety interventions for children.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011