Matching Items (2)

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Benefits of a Combined Practice Approach for Athletes: Motor Imagery and Physical Practice

Description

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an intervention involving physical practice combined with motor imagery and physical practice alone on swimming performance for fifty-yard freestyle.

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an intervention involving physical practice combined with motor imagery and physical practice alone on swimming performance for fifty-yard freestyle. Forty-five male and female high school swimmers were participants on two different high school teams. One team was the treatment group, which included the participants partaking in both motor imagery and physical practice. The other team served as the age matched control group, and the swimmers participated in physical practice only. The combined practice group performed motor imagery three times per week and physical practice five times per week. The physical practice only group performed physical practice five times per week. Each group performed their respective tasks for 9-weeks. Pre-, half-point, and post-tests consisted of a timed fifty-yard freestyle. The treatment group produced significantly faster times on the percent change in swim time scores in comparison to the control group for the half-time to post-time and pre-time to post-time score (p=.000). The treatment group also produced better performances on the pre-time to half-time scores, however, the results were not statistically significant (p = .009). Findings, therefore, support the effectiveness of motor imagery in enhancing swim performance, when combined with physical practice.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

Explaining Motor Imagery: Mirror Neurons as a Physiological Mechanism

Description

This project, which consists of a review article and an applied creative project, proposes mirror neurons as being a physiological mechanism for motor imagery. The review article highlights similarities between

This project, which consists of a review article and an applied creative project, proposes mirror neurons as being a physiological mechanism for motor imagery. The review article highlights similarities between motor imagery research and research on mirror neurons. The research is roughly divided into three types of studies: neuroimaging studies, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyography (EMG) studies, and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. The review also discusses the associative hypothesis of mirror neuron origin as support for the hypothesis and concludes with an assessment of conflicting research and the limitations of the hypothesis. The applied creative project is an instructional brochure, aimed at anyone who teaches motor skills, such as dance teachers or sports coaches. The brochure takes the academic content of the review and presents it in a visually pleasing, reader-friendly fashion in an effort to educate the intended audience and make the research more accessible. The brochure also prescribes research-based suggestions for how to use motor imagery during teaching sessions and how to get the best benefits from it.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05