Matching Items (7)

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Is An Enviable Life An Achievable Option for Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in the United States: A Review of Literature

Description

This literature review investigates the idea of what makes a person’s life ‘enviable’ by defining the term and then by exploring the question of whether or not young adults with

This literature review investigates the idea of what makes a person’s life ‘enviable’ by defining the term and then by exploring the question of whether or not young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States can achieve an enviable life as defined. This literature review synthesizes current and historic research through an analysis of various studies on outcomes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), their families, and the resources offered within community platforms to help create such a life for young adults with IDD. This review also aims to help change society’s views on young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and challenges the community to address this issue further in order to create a more accessible, enviable, and inclusive lifestyle for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Without destroying ourselves: American Indian intellectual activism for higher education, 1915-1978

Description

This dissertation examines a long-term activist effort by American Indian educators and intellectual leaders to work for greater Native access to and control of American higher education. Specifically, the leaders

This dissertation examines a long-term activist effort by American Indian educators and intellectual leaders to work for greater Native access to and control of American higher education. Specifically, the leaders of this effort built a powerful critique of how American systems of higher education served Native individuals and reservation communities throughout much of the twentieth century. They argued for new forms of higher education and leadership training that appropriated some mainstream educational models but that also adapted those models to endorse Native expressions of culture and identity. They sought to move beyond the failures of existing educational programs and to exercise Native control, encouraging intellectual leadership and empowerment on local and national levels. The dissertation begins with Henry Roe Cloud (Winnebago) and his American Indian Institute, a preparatory school founded in 1915 and dedicated to these principles. From there, the words and actions of key leaders such as Elizabeth Roe Cloud (Ojibwe), D’Arcy McNickle (Salish Kootenai), Jack Forbes (Powhatan-Renapé, Delaware-Lenape), and Robert and Ruth Roessel (Navajo), are also examined to reveal a decades-long thread of Native intellectual activism that contributed to the development of American Indian self-determination and directly impacted the philosophical and practical founding of tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) in the 1960s and 1970s. These schools continue to operate in dozens of Native communities. These individuals also contributed to and influenced national organizations such as the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC), while maintaining connections to grassroots efforts at Native educational empowerment. The period covered in this history witnessed many forms of Native activism, including groups from the Society of American Indians (SAI) to the American Indian Movement (AIM) and beyond. The focus on “intellectual activism,” however, emphasizes that this particular vein of activism was and is still oriented toward the growth of Native intellectualism and its practical influence in modern American Indian lives. It involves action that is political but also specifically educational, and thus rests on the input of prominent Native intellectuals but also on local educators, administrators, government officials, and students themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Rithöfundursögur or writer sagas: a narrative inquiry of 10th-graders' compositions of agentic writer identity in a choice-rich, self-reflective, and mindset-supportive English class

Description

A sequential mixed-methods action research study was undertaken with a group of 10th-grade students enrolled in a required English course at an independent secondary school. The purpose of the study

A sequential mixed-methods action research study was undertaken with a group of 10th-grade students enrolled in a required English course at an independent secondary school. The purpose of the study was to investigate students' negotiation of agentic writer identity in a course that featured a three-strand intervention: (a) a high degree of student choice; (b) ongoing written self-reflection; and (c) ongoing instruction in mindset. The researcher drew on self-determination theory and identity theory to operationalize agentic writer identity around three constructs—behaviors, identity, and belief. A questionnaire was used to identify an array of cases that would illustrate a range of experiences around agentic writer identity. Questionnaire data were analyzed to identify a sample from which to collect qualitative data and to identify prominent central relations among the three constructs, which were further explored in the second stage through the qualitative data. Qualitative data were gathered from a primary group of six students in the form of student journals and interviews around the central constructs of writing belief, writing behavior, and writer identity. Using a snowballing sampling method, four students were added to the sample group to form a second tier of data. The corpus of qualitative data from all 10 students was coded and analyzed using the technique of re-storying to produce a narrative interpretation, in the style of the Norse saga, of students' engagement in agentic writing behaviors, espousal of agentic writing beliefs, and construction of agentic writer identities. A defense of the chosen narrative approach and genre was provided. Interpretation of the re-storied data was provided, including discussion of interaction among themes that emerged from the data and the re-storying process. Emergent themes and phenomena from the re-storied data were realigned with the quantitative data as well as with the constructs that informed the survey design and sampling. Implications for classroom teachers, as well as suggestions for further research, were suggested.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Remaking a people, restoring a watershed: Klamath tribal empowerment through natural resource activism, 1960-2014

Description

Natural resources management is a pressing issue for Native American nations and communities. More than ever before, tribal officials sit at the decision-making tables with federal and state officials

Natural resources management is a pressing issue for Native American nations and communities. More than ever before, tribal officials sit at the decision-making tables with federal and state officials as well as non-governmental natural resource stakeholders. This, however, has not always been the case. This dissertation focuses on tribal activism to demonstrate how and why tribal sovereignty, self-determination, and treaty rights protection are tied closely to contemporary environmental issues and natural resources management. With the Klamath Tribes of southern Oregon as a case study, this dissertation analyzes how a tribal nation garnered a political position in which it could both indirectly influence and directly orchestrate natural resource management within and outside of its sovereign boundaries. The Klamath Tribes experienced the devastating termination policy in the 1950s. Termination stripped them of their federal status as an Indian tribe, the government services offered to recognized tribes, and their 1.2-million-acre reservation. Despite this horrific event, the Klamaths emerged by the 2000s as leading natural resource stakeholders in the Klamath River Watershed, a region ten times larger than their former reservation. The Klamaths used tools, such as their treaty and water rights, and employed careful political, legal, and social tactics. For example, they litigated, appropriated science, participated in democratic national environmental policy processes, and developed a lexicon. They also negotiated and established alliances with non-governmental stakeholders in order to refocus watershed management toward a holistic approach that promoted ecological restoration.

This study applies spatial theory and an ethnohistorical approach to show how traditional values drove the Klamaths’ contemporary activism. From their perspective, healing the land would heal the people. The Klamaths’ history illuminates the active roles that tribes have had in the institutionalization of the federal self-determination policy as federal agencies resisted recognizing tribes and working with them in government-to-government relationships. Through their efforts to weave their interests into natural resource management with state, federal, and non-governmental stakeholders, the Klamaths took part in a much larger historical trend, the increased pluralization of American society.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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The earth memory compass: Diné educational experiences in the twentieth century

Description

This dissertation explores how historical changes in education shaped Diné collective identity and community by examining the interconnections between Navajo students, their people, and Diné Bikéyah (Navajo lands). Farina King

This dissertation explores how historical changes in education shaped Diné collective identity and community by examining the interconnections between Navajo students, their people, and Diné Bikéyah (Navajo lands). Farina King investigates the ongoing influence of various schools as colonial institutions among the Navajo from the 1930s to 1990 in the southwestern United States. The question that guides this research is how institutional schools, whether far, near, or on the reservation, affected Navajo students’ sense of home and relationships with their Indigenous community during the twentieth century.

The study relies on a Diné historical framework that centers on a Navajo mapping of the world and earth memory compass. The four directions of their sacred mountains orient the Diné towards hózhǫ́, the ideal of society, a desirable state of being that most translate as beauty, harmony, or happiness. Their sacred mountains mark Diné Bikéyah and provide an earth memory compass in Navajo life journeys that direct them from East, to South, to West, and to North. These four directions and the symbols associated with them guide this overarching narrative of Navajo educational experiences from the beginning of Diné learning in their home communities, to the adolescent stages of their institutionalized schooling, to the recent maturity of hybrid Navajo-American educational systems. After addressing the Diné ancestral teachings of the East, King focuses on the student experiences of interwar Crownpoint Boarding School to the South, the postwar Tuba City Boarding School and Leupp Boarding School to the West, and self-determination in Monument Valley to the North.

This study primarily analyzes oral histories and cultural historical methodologies to feature Diné perspectives, which reveal how the land and the mountains serve as focal points of Navajo worldviews. The land defines Diné identity, although many Navajos have adapted to different life pathways. Therefore, land, environment, and nature constituted integral parts and embeddedness of Diné knowledge and epistemology that external educational systems, such as federal schools, failed to overcome in the twentieth century.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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The impact of moving toward a culture of empowerment in the lives of residents of assisted living centers

Description

ABSTRACT The massive number of baby boomers approaching retirement age has been termed the `gray tsunami.' As America's gray tsunami approaches, healthcare workers and social workers will become overwhelmed with

ABSTRACT The massive number of baby boomers approaching retirement age has been termed the `gray tsunami.' As America's gray tsunami approaches, healthcare workers and social workers will become overwhelmed with requests for services and supports (St. Luke's Health Initiative, 2001; Bekemeier, 2009). This impact can be ameliorated by assisting aging individuals in maintaining or in some cases regaining independence. Individuals who live in assisted living facilities (AFLs) come from diverse backgrounds. Many of these individuals have lived in paternalistic environments such as prisons and mental health institutions. As a consequence of these disempowering conditions, residents of ALFs may experience increased depression, decreased self-esteem, and decreased locus of control (R. Hess, personal communication, September 30, 2010). These disabling conditions can severely limit residents' choice-making opportunities and control over their own lives. If programs can be created to provide empowering experiences and to teach self-advocacy skills, I hypothesize that residents will report an improved quality of life and display fewer depressive symptoms, increased self-esteem, and increased locus of control. Helping these individuals to maintain or regain independence will not only reduce the workload for care workers, it will enhance the lives of residents. The only hypothesis that was supported by the study was an improvement in residents' quality of life, and that hypothesis was only partially supported. Two of the five domains in the Residents' Quality of life questionnaire indicated an increase in quality of life. ii The Activities subscale of the Ferrans & Powers Quality also indicated that there was an increase in quality of life.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Teachers L.E.A.D. (Learn. Engage. Act. Discuss): a study of teacher leaders' perceptions on engagement in school improvement

Description

“If you treat an individual as he is, he will stay as he is,

but if you treat him as if he were what he ought to be

and could

“If you treat an individual as he is, he will stay as he is,

but if you treat him as if he were what he ought to be

and could be, he will become what he ought and could be.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

Teacher leaders in public education have a great amount of responsibility on their shoulders in today’s political climate. They are responsible for evaluating instruction, improving the teaching force, and raising student achievement. These responsibilities coupled with the day-to-day demands of effectively running a school have caused many teacher leaders to disengage from the true purpose of their work and have lead to retention rates that are less than desirable. This mixed methods action research study was conducted to investigate how participation in L.E.A.D. (Learn. Engage. Act. Discuss.) groups, influenced the self-perceptions teacher leaders have of their ability to engage in the change process at their schools. The innovation was a series of three action-driven sessions aimed at providing the participating teacher leaders with a space to discuss their roles in the change process at their school, their perceived engagement in those processes, and their perceived ability to navigate the technical, normative, and political dimensions of change. The greater purpose behind the design of this innovation was to provide teacher leaders with tools they could utilize that would support them in the realization that their level of engagement was not totally dependent on those around them. Through the L.E.A.D. groups, it became evident that the participating teacher leaders were resilient and optimistic individuals that, despite factors outside of their control demanding their time and energy, were still dedicated to the change process at their schools.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016