Matching Items (16)

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Elementary Latin After-School Program Curriculum

Description

For my honors creative project, I decided to create and teach an elementary school Latin curriculum. As a Classics major, I love the Latin language and I was thrilled to

For my honors creative project, I decided to create and teach an elementary school Latin curriculum. As a Classics major, I love the Latin language and I was thrilled to be able to introduce my students to the Latin language in an interesting and fun way. I have taught weekly Latin lessons for this school year on Friday afternoons at a local private school. Each class is forty-five minutes long and involves students from kindergarten through eighth grade. The Latin classes were an optional offering after school. The creative element of this honors creative project was recording and compiling my weekly lesson plans. Since these lesson plans were taught in an after school setting, I wanted to ensure that my students found the lessons enjoyable. Therefore, each lesson has a project for the students to work on which enforces the concepts learned in each lesson. I tried to teach the students a variety of vocabulary that would be found in any introductory Latin course. In addition to teaching Latin nouns and verbs, I also tried to teach the class Latin roots that are found in English. I supplemented these lesson plans with stories of Roman mythology or Roman history, so that my students would have a greater appreciation for the Latin language. Almost all of these stories had to be simplified to ensure that they would be age-appropriate to tell to my class. Although my students all had taken Spanish classes, none of them had experience with Latin instruction. It was therefore unsurprising that most of the class showed huge improvement in their pre and post tests, given at the beginning of the school year in August, and again in March. I supplemented these lesson plans in my honors project with a literature review on the history and benefits of Latin instruction. Additionally, I included an extensive annotated bibliography of scholarly and didactic works useful to Latin instructors.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Multi-Age Classroom Curriculum Implementing Thematic Units, Grades 4-6

Description

This creative project cites research on the benefits of multi-age education and thematic units to raise awareness and to promote the use of these educational strategies. Research shows that multi-age

This creative project cites research on the benefits of multi-age education and thematic units to raise awareness and to promote the use of these educational strategies. Research shows that multi-age education can be beneficial to students by allowing students to work at their own pace in each subject. In a multi-age classroom, students are grouped by ability rather than age, which allows all students to excel in areas they are gifted in and to receive additional help in weaker subjects. This setting allows students to collaborate with learners of various ages and abilities, which promotes pro-social behaviors and reinforces learning. While multi-age met its peak in the American education system in the 1980s-1990s, in recent decades, multi-age learning has lost its momentum due to poorly implemented programs and improperly trained teachers (Grant, et al., 1996, p. 31). Through this creative project, a curriculum based on thematic units for a multi-age classroom comprised of 4th-6th grades was actualized. This project provides a basic structure of a daily schedule and various teaching strategies to organize a multi-age classroom. However, the main focus of this project is on the development of one thematic unit to exemplify how a teacher can implement a thematic unit in a multi-age classroom and scaffold the learning effectively depending on each student's level and ability. The unit was centered on the theme of Ancient Greece and Rome, which was implemented into three content areas: social studies, language arts, and science. The ultimate goal of this creative project is to publish the curriculum and make it available to teachers who are interested in implementing a multi-age curriculum in their classrooms. This curriculum will provide them with a model of a classroom structure and a sample unit, paired with research to support the benefits of multi-age and thematic unit approaches.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Influence of School-Based Sexual Health Education on Sexual Behavior and Health Outcomes in the United States: An Analysis of Sexual Health Education in the United States with a Focused Comparison of the Sexual Health Education Curriculums

Description

Sexual health education varies in its delivery, efficacy, and comprehensiveness throughout each of the fifty states of the United States of America. These differences at the state level in the

Sexual health education varies in its delivery, efficacy, and comprehensiveness throughout each of the fifty states of the United States of America. These differences at the state level in the sexual health education curriculum lead to varying health outcomes for students during their time in school, as well as impact their future experiences. This study examines the sexual health education curriculum of two states located with very different perspectives on how sexual health education should be taught, Arizona and New Jersey. This study analyzes the efficacy of curricula mandated by each state by looking at the average age of initial sexual encounter, the teen pregnancy rates, abortion rates, and cases of sexually transmitted infections. The goal of this study is to show the necessity for comprehensive sexual health education in order to reduce risky behavior in adolescents' sexual encounters, increase awareness surrounding an individual's health, and improving health outcomes for all individuals, from adolescence into adulthood.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Sustainability Competencies in Middle-School Curriculum: Educating Students About Water Systems and Drought

Description

Current literature on sustainability education and its core competencies (systems thinking, normative, interpersonal, strategic, and future thinking) has yet to acknowledge the K-12 level, concentrating instead on higher-level institutions. To

Current literature on sustainability education and its core competencies (systems thinking, normative, interpersonal, strategic, and future thinking) has yet to acknowledge the K-12 level, concentrating instead on higher-level institutions. To initiate study at the critical K-12 level, a curriculum module composed of four lessons to address the wicked sustainability problem of drought in the Sonoran Desert was developed, piloted, and evaluated. The framework of each lesson combined the core competencies and the 5Es pedagogy (engage, explore, explain, elaborate, and evaluate). Two lessons were successfully piloted in two seventh grade middle-school science classes in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics addressed were the water cycle, types of drought, water systems, and mitigation methods. Evaluation determined a high level of student engagement. Post-pilot teacher questionnaires revealed a high degree of support for inclusion of sustainability education and core competencies addressing drought in future opportunities. It is concluded that lessons in the future can adopt the core competences of sustainability with the support of educators in Arizona.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Service Learning in Early Childhood

Description

For the past few decades, the education system in the United States has failed many students because of its inability to increase student achievement. While there are many layers to

For the past few decades, the education system in the United States has failed many students because of its inability to increase student achievement. While there are many layers to this problem that cannot be solved with one simple solution, a curriculum change that provides students with more engaging and hands on learning opportunities along with teaching them to be advocates for their own education and community betterment offers a great start to the momentum for change. Service-learning is an ideal way to accomplish this because it incorporates civic engagement and community service into lesson plans that directly align with academic standards. Through service-learning, students are given the opportunity to apply their knowledge in direct and hands on ways meanwhile witnessing the difference that they can make in their community with their knowledge and abilities. Service-learning is a type of instruction typically employed in high school or junior high grades because it requires the course content to coincide with a service project of some kind. In this essay, we look into the research behind service-learning as well as several issues within the community that could be addressed with this kind of curriculum. The aim of this research is to adapt the models of service-learning intended for more advanced grades to align with the standards of a first grade curriculum and also consider the critical thinking skills, self-examination abilities, and social awareness of students at this age when making these adaptations. We believe that service-learning can benefit young students just as much, if not more than older students because it can help them to see the value in their education from early on and demonstrates real life uses for what they are learning. The curriculum created from this research is intended for use at schools within low-income communities in order to empower the students to actively fight against the challenges they face that prevent them from succeeding. However, this curriculum can easily be used in any school setting and adapted to various different age levels.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Mapping the newly menstruating body: Qualitative analysis of teachers' experiences with menstruation education and ""hygiene"" curriculum in elementary schools

Description

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference within school sanctioned curricula. A closer examination of this pedagogical moment from the perspective of educators helps us to understand the dissemination of the shame narrative present in menstrual socialization. Six teachers were interviewed about their experiences with administering the menstrual health curriculum in elementary schools across a large southwest metropolitan area. A discourse analysis of these interviews was completed in order to find themes of language used surrounding menstrual health curriculum. Themes of shame, legislative restrictions on sex education curriculum and personal narratives surrounding menstruation are discussed in addition to the current neo-liberal structure of public health curriculum. Future research into alternative modes of education on menstruation is proposed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Improving Undergraduate Structural Engineering Education and Assessing the Use of Technology in Structural Analysis and Design Courses

Description

The civil engineering curriculum includes the engineering fields of environmental, geotechnical, hydrology, structural, and transportation. A particular focus on the structural engineering curriculum outline involves courses in mathematics, engineering mechanics,

The civil engineering curriculum includes the engineering fields of environmental, geotechnical, hydrology, structural, and transportation. A particular focus on the structural engineering curriculum outline involves courses in mathematics, engineering mechanics, structural analysis, and structural design. The core structural analysis and design course at Arizona State University (CEE 321) is a transition course to connect realistic structural design and analysis concepts to an engineering foundation created by the first and second year mathematics and mechanics courses. CEE 321 is styled after a flipped classroom model and students are assessed through quizzes, midterms, design projects, and a final exam. Student performance was evaluated for the Spring 2013 and Fall 2013 semesters through an error analysis technique designed to categorize student mistakes based on type of error and related topic. This analysis revealed that student's basic engineering mechanics skills improved throughout the course as well as identified the areas that students struggle in. The slope-deflection and direct stiffness methods of analysis and calculating cross-sectional properties are the primary areas of concern. Using appropriate technology in the engineering classroom has the potential to enhance the learning environment and address the areas of inadequacy identified by the performance analysis. A survey of CEE 321 students demonstrated that technology is a highly integrated and useful portion of student's lives. Therefore, the engineering classroom should reflect this. Through the use of analysis and design software, students are able to begin to develop design intuition and understanding while completing realistic engineering projects in their third year of undergraduate studies. Additionally, incorporating internet resources into and outside of the classroom allows students to be connected to course content from any web-enabled device of their choice. Lecture videos posted online covering the course content were requested by many CEE 321 students and are an emerging resource that supplements the flipped classroom model. The availability of such a tool allows students to revisit concepts that they do not understand or pause, rewind, and replay the lectures when necessary. An expansion of the structural analysis and design online lecture videos for CEE 321 are expected to address and improve the areas that students struggle in as identified by the error analysis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

Educational Workshops to Bring Awareness of Animal Related Careers in the Framework of Animal Welfare and Conservation

Description

American youth are not well exposed to animal- and nature-related careers. This is especially important to consider due to the recent push to be more environmentally conscious. In addition, youth

American youth are not well exposed to animal- and nature-related careers. This is especially important to consider due to the recent push to be more environmentally conscious. In addition, youth are spending less time outside and more time in front of screens. This is driving down biophilia strength. The combination of a weaker connection with nature and more screen time has been connected to a new condition named Nature-Deficit Disorder. In order to expose youth to animal- and nature-related careers while attempting to combat the growing presence of Nature-Deficit Disorder, a three day teaching program named Wild Careers was created. This program was presented to teens in December 2015 through a partnership with the education department of Arizona Animal Welfare League. The curriculum was centered on highlighting relevant careers and background information. Topics such as animal welfare and conservation were taught as cornerstones during the program due to their encompassing importance to the career fields in question. It was felt to be important to inform participants about the context of these fields through specially planned activities and guest speakers. Participants were challenged to conduct online research, think critically, and get hands-on during this program. Wild Careers also exposed the participants to animals and the relevant species management stories. The surveys given before and after the presentation of the created curriculum provided evidence that supported an increased understanding of careers and enjoyment of participants. I propose that other non-formal teaching environments should be created that target exposing youth to animals, nature, and related careers.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Building Resilience Through Creative Writing

Description

Resilience is defined as an individual's ability to cope or "bounce back" after experiencing stressful life events (Rew et al., 2001). Survivors of trauma who express high levels of resilience

Resilience is defined as an individual's ability to cope or "bounce back" after experiencing stressful life events (Rew et al., 2001). Survivors of trauma who express high levels of resilience are more likely to experience positive future life outcomes than equally troubled peers with lower resilience scores. It is possible to increase resilience by targeting several core factors: (1) personal competence, (2) sense of belonging, (3) sense of optimism (Lee et al., 2009). I developed an eight-week creative writing curriculum to boost these three core factors in the hopes of both increasing resilience in homeless youth while also introducing creating writing as an effective coping strategy. Each one-hour session included free-form writing exercises, mindfulness practices, writing workshops, and group presentations. Prompts and activities were carefully developed to encourage resilience-building in a group of homeless children and adolescents of ages seven to fourteen at Homeward Bound in Phoenix. With sample writing works and facilitator feedback, this curriculum was designed to be exceptionally easy and cost effective for future implementation. I hope that other organizations in the future will consider implementing this program to help build resilience in youth who have experienced childhood trauma.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Exploring Panem: Teaching Issues of Violence and International Development within the Context of The Hunger Games

Description

This project created a teaching curriculum resource guide for using the popular series, The Hunger Games, in 6th-8th grade classrooms to introduce cultural issues such as child soldiers and international

This project created a teaching curriculum resource guide for using the popular series, The Hunger Games, in 6th-8th grade classrooms to introduce cultural issues such as child soldiers and international development to students. Studies have shown that literature can cultivate empathy and encourage youth to act. This combined with the expanding phenomenon of participatory culture and fandom activism as outlined by Henry Jenkins demonstrate the potential for youth to learn and act when given the opportunity and resources to do so. The curriculum is composed of three units: The first is a three-week reading of the books with various activities for students to really understand the narrative and source text. The second and third units address the issues of child soldiers and international development using The Hunger Games as a framework and a keystone to build connections so that these complex issues are accessible to youth. This project is a first step in the development of a curriculum that spans the full trilogy and covers a variety of current event topics.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05