Matching Items (5)

A Concept for Using Superformula and Information Theory to Identify and Prioritize Interesting Objects in Autonomous Exploration

Description

In order to refine autonomous exploratory movement planning schemes, an approach must be developed that accounts for valuable information other than that gained from map filling. To this end, the

In order to refine autonomous exploratory movement planning schemes, an approach must be developed that accounts for valuable information other than that gained from map filling. To this end, the goal of this thesis is divided into two parts. The first is to develop a technique for categorizing objects detected by an autonomous exploratory robot and assigning them a score based on their interest value. The second is an attempt to develop a method of integrating this technique into a navigation algorithm in order to refine the movements of a robot or robots to maximize the efficiency of information gain. The intention of both of these components is to provide a method of refining the navigation scheme applied to autonomous exploring robots and maximize the amount of information they can gather in deployments where they face significant resource or functionality constraints. To this end this project is divided into two main sections: a shape-matching technique and a simulation in in which to implement this technique. The first section was accomplished by combining concepts from information theory, principal component analysis, and the eigenfaces algorithm to create an effective matching technique. The second was created with inspiration from existing navigation algorithms. Once these components were determined to be functional, a testing regime was applied to determine their capabilities. The testing regime was also divided into two parts. The tests applied to the matching technique were first to demonstrate that it functions under ideal conditions. After testing was conducted under ideal conditions, the technique was tested under non-ideal conditions. Additional tests were run to determine how the system responded to changes in the coefficients and equations that govern its operation. Similarly, the simulation component was initially tested under normal conditions to determine the base effectiveness of the approach. After these tests were conducted, alternative conditions were tested to evaluate the effects of modifying the implementation technique. The results of these tests indicated a few things. The first series of tests confirmed that the matching technique functions as expected under ideal conditions. The second series of tests determined that the matching element is effective for a reasonable range of variations and non-ideal conditions. The third series of tests showed that changing the functional coefficients of the matching technique can help tune the technique to different conditions. The fourth series of tests demonstrated that the basic concept of the implementation technique makes sense. The final series of tests demonstrated that modifying the implementation method is at least somewhat effective and that modifications to it can be used to specifically tailor the implementation to a method. Overall the results indicate that the stated goals of the project were accomplished successfully.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Exploring Undergraduate Admissions through the Development of Shadowing Programs

Description

The thesis titled "Exploring Undergraduate Admissions through the Development of Shadowing Programs" is an organizational study and analysis of a shadowing program developed by Krista Moller, Ryan Johnson, and Kean

The thesis titled "Exploring Undergraduate Admissions through the Development of Shadowing Programs" is an organizational study and analysis of a shadowing program developed by Krista Moller, Ryan Johnson, and Kean Thomas. It resulted in the creation of a 25+ person student organization in the W.P. Carey School of Business called "Explore". The organization received backing and support from the admissions department in W.P. Carey, notably Dean of Admissions, Timothy Desch. The organization's members (titled "ambassadors") host a high school student interested in the business school for a day of class. High school students are matched with an ambassador based on majors they might be interested in, and ideally the result of the day of shadowing is the high school student having a better understanding of the opportunities available at W.P. Carey. The organization began in the fall of 2013, and was intended to be used as a thesis project from its inception. As a result, the founder's experiences were carefully documented and this allowed for a detailed analysis to take place. The analysis delves into the difficulties faced by the organization's members and executive board as a result of internal and external influences. The successes and experiences they were fortunate enough to have are also detailed, and plans for the organization's future are included as well. In addition, the Explore program is analyzed in comparison to other programs around the country and even in Canada, with the goal being to see where we could potentially strengthen our program. The founders of the Explore program (and authors of this thesis) hope other students might learn from it so that more programs such as Explore can be created, benefiting the local community and ASU itself.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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When Learning to Play Becomes Playing to Learn

Description

Exploratory Play is a universal experience that occurs throughout different kinds of childhoods. This study investigates how children’s vocabulary and exploratory play are influenced by how the caregiver responds to

Exploratory Play is a universal experience that occurs throughout different kinds of childhoods. This study investigates how children’s vocabulary and exploratory play are influenced by how the caregiver responds to the child’s communicative bids. We hypothesize that if caregivers use more open-ended questions in response to their child’s communicative bids, children will show higher rates of exploration during free play.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Evolving Frontier: Comparing the Historical Dynamics of Private Enterprise in Earth and Space Exploration

Description

Guided by the Obama administration, NASA has begun developing commercial launch capabilities. For both cargo and crew delivery to the International Space Station, NASA has selected companies to build and

Guided by the Obama administration, NASA has begun developing commercial launch capabilities. For both cargo and crew delivery to the International Space Station, NASA has selected companies to build and operate the vehicles at a fixed price. Alexander McDonald suggests that this continues a trend in space exploration established by large observatory projects, and that the Apollo-era style of funding and operation was a historical anomaly. This paper attempts to discover if historical analog can support or weaken this thesis. The analogs chosen are two episodes in the history of terrestrial exploration: the experience of the Spanish and British empires in North America. These are compared to the history of space exploration up until today, focusing on how the role of private enterprise has changed in each instance. While the analogies between historical episodes are weak in a few areas, they do possess a common narrative concerning the shifting balance between private and government interests. This narrative supports McDonald's thesis, and shows that NASA's current policy anticipates an expected transition towards a private-public hybrid model of exploration and expansion.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Exploratory Team Cognition and Resilience in Human Agent Teaming

Description

Human-agent teams (HATs) are expected to play a larger role in future command and control systems where resilience is critical for team effectiveness. The question of how HATs interact to

Human-agent teams (HATs) are expected to play a larger role in future command and control systems where resilience is critical for team effectiveness. The question of how HATs interact to be effective in both normal and unexpected situations is worthy of further examination. Exploratory behaviors are one that way adaptive systems discover opportunities to expand and refine their performance. In this study, team interaction exploration is examined in a HAT composed of a human navigator, human photographer, and a synthetic pilot while they perform a remotely-piloted aerial reconnaissance task. Failures in automation and the synthetic pilot’s autonomy were injected throughout ten missions as roadblocks. Teams were clustered by performance into high-, middle-, and low-performing groups. It was hypothesized that high-performing teams would exchange more text-messages containing unique content or sender-recipient combinations than middle- and low-performing teams, and that teams would exchange less unique messages over time. The results indicate that high-performing teams had more unique team interactions than middle-performing teams. Additionally, teams generally had more exploratory team interactions in the first session of missions than the second session. Implications and suggestions for future work are discussed.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019