Matching Items (4)

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Collaborative Computation in Self-Organizing Particle Systems

Description

Many forms of programmable matter have been proposed for various tasks. We use an abstract model of self-organizing particle systems for programmable matter which could be used for a variety of applications, including smart paint and coating materials for engineering

Many forms of programmable matter have been proposed for various tasks. We use an abstract model of self-organizing particle systems for programmable matter which could be used for a variety of applications, including smart paint and coating materials for engineering or programmable cells for medical uses. Previous research using this model has focused on shape formation and other spatial configuration problems, including line formation, compression, and coating. In this work we study foundational computational tasks that exceed the capabilities of the individual constant memory particles described by the model. These tasks represent new ways to use these self-organizing systems, which, in conjunction with previous shape and configuration work, make the systems useful for a wider variety of tasks. We present an implementation of a counter using a line of particles, which makes it possible for the line of particles to count to and store values much larger than their individual capacities. We then present an algorithm that takes a matrix and a vector as input and then sets up and uses a rectangular block of particles to compute the matrix-vector multiplication. This setup also utilizes the counter implementation to store the resulting vector from the matrix-vector multiplication. Operations such as counting and matrix multiplication can leverage the distributed and dynamic nature of the self-organizing system to be more efficient and adaptable than on traditional linear computing hardware. Such computational tools also give the systems more power to make complex decisions when adapting to new situations or to analyze the data they collect, reducing reliance on a central controller for setup and output processing. Finally, we demonstrate an application of similar types of computations with self-organizing systems to image processing, with an implementation of an image edge detection algorithm.

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Date Created
2016-12

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Compression in Self-Organizing Particle Systems

Description

Many programmable matter systems have been proposed and realized recently, each often tailored toward a particular task or physical setting. In our work on self-organizing particle systems, we abstract away from specific settings and instead describe programmable matter as a

Many programmable matter systems have been proposed and realized recently, each often tailored toward a particular task or physical setting. In our work on self-organizing particle systems, we abstract away from specific settings and instead describe programmable matter as a collection of simple computational elements (to be referred to as particles) with limited computational power that each perform fully distributed, local, asynchronous algorithms to solve system-wide problems of movement, configuration, and coordination. In this thesis, we focus on the compression problem, in which the particle system gathers as tightly together as possible, as in a sphere or its equivalent in the presence of some underlying geometry. While there are many ways to formalize what it means for a particle system to be compressed, we address three different notions of compression: (1) local compression, in which each individual particle utilizes local rules to create an overall convex structure containing no holes, (2) hole elimination, in which the particle system seeks to detect and eliminate any holes it contains, and (3) alpha-compression, in which the particle system seeks to shrink its perimeter to be within a constant factor of the minimum possible value. We analyze the behavior of each of these algorithms, examining correctness and convergence where appropriate. In the case of the Markov Chain Algorithm for Compression, we provide improvements to the original bounds for the bias parameter lambda which influences the system to either compress or expand. Lastly, we briefly discuss contributions to the problem of leader election--in which a particle system elects a single leader--since it acts as an important prerequisite for compression algorithms that use a predetermined seed particle.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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Algorithmic Foundations of Self-Organizing Programmable Matter

Description

Imagine that we have a piece of matter that can change its physical properties like its shape, density, conductivity, or color in a programmable fashion based on either user input or autonomous sensing. This is the vision behind what is

Imagine that we have a piece of matter that can change its physical properties like its shape, density, conductivity, or color in a programmable fashion based on either user input or autonomous sensing. This is the vision behind what is commonly known as programmable matter. Envisioning systems of nano-sensors devices, programmable matter consists of systems of simple computational elements, called particles, that can establish and release bonds, compute, and can actively move in a self-organized way. In this dissertation the feasibility of solving fundamental problems relevant for programmable matter is investigated. As a model for such self-organizing particle systems (SOPS), the geometric amoebot model is introduced. In this model, particles only have local information and have modest computational power. They achieve locomotion by expanding and contracting, which resembles the behavior of amoeba. Under this model, efficient local-control algorithms for the leader election problem in SOPS are presented. As a central problem for programmable matter, shape formation problems are then studied. The limitations of solving the leader election problem and the shape formation problem on a more general version of the amoebot model are also discussed. The \smart paint" problem is also studied which aims at having the particles self-organize in order to uniformly coat the surface of an object of arbitrary shape and size, forming multiple coating layers if necessary. A Universal Coating algorithm is presented and shown to be asymptotically worst-case optimal both in terms of time with high probability and work. In particular, the algorithm always terminates within a linear number of rounds with high probability. A linear lower bound on the competitive gap between fully local coating algorithms and coating algorithms that rely on global information is presented, which implies that the proposed algorithm is also optimal in a competitive sense. Simulation results show that the competitive ratio of the proposed algorithm may be better than linear in practice. Developed algorithms utilize only local control, require only constant-size memory particles, and are asymptotically optimal in terms of the total number of particle movements needed to reach the desired shape configuration.

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Date Created
2017

Collaborating in Motion: Distributed and Stochastic Algorithms for Emergent Behavior in Programmable Matter

Description

The world is filled with systems of entities that collaborate in motion, both natural and engineered. These cooperative distributed systems are capable of sophisticated emergent behavior arising from the comparatively simple interactions of their members. A model system for emergent

The world is filled with systems of entities that collaborate in motion, both natural and engineered. These cooperative distributed systems are capable of sophisticated emergent behavior arising from the comparatively simple interactions of their members. A model system for emergent collective behavior is programmable matter, a physical substance capable of autonomously changing its properties in response to user input or environmental stimuli. This dissertation studies distributed and stochastic algorithms that control the local behaviors of individual modules of programmable matter to induce complex collective behavior at the macroscale. It consists of four parts. In the first, the canonical amoebot model of programmable matter is proposed. A key goal of this model is to bring algorithmic theory closer to the physical realities of programmable matter hardware, especially with respect to concurrency and energy distribution. Two protocols are presented that together extend sequential, energy-agnostic algorithms to the more realistic concurrent, energy-constrained setting without sacrificing correctness, assuming the original algorithms satisfy certain conventions. In the second part, stateful distributed algorithms using amoebot memory and communication are presented for leader election, object coating, convex hull formation, and hexagon formation. The first three algorithms are proven to have linear runtimes when assuming a simplified sequential setting. The final algorithm for hexagon formation is instead proven to be correct under unfair asynchronous adversarial activation, the most general of all adversarial activation models. In the third part, distributed algorithms are combined with ideas from statistical physics and Markov chain design to replace algorithm reliance on memory and communication with biased random decisions, gaining inherent self-stabilizing and fault-tolerant properties. Using this stochastic approach, algorithms for compression, shortcut bridging, and separation are designed and analyzed. Finally, a two-pronged approach to "programming" physical ensembles is presented. This approach leverages the physics of local interactions to pair theoretical abstractions of self-organizing particle systems with experimental robot systems of active granular matter that intentionally lack digital computation and communication. By physically embodying the salient features of an algorithm in robot design, the algorithm's theoretical analysis can predict the robot ensemble's behavior. This approach is applied to phototaxing, aggregation, dispersion, and object transport.

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Date Created
2021