Matching Items (6)

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Cross-Country Supply Chain Outreach: A Partnership between Collegiate Students at the Arizona State University and High School Students at the Urban Assembly of Global Commerce

Description

Over the course of 2015-2017, the ASU-SCMA/UASGC Outreach program was developed at Arizona State University (ASU) to support both high school students and college students interested in supply chain management

Over the course of 2015-2017, the ASU-SCMA/UASGC Outreach program was developed at Arizona State University (ASU) to support both high school students and college students interested in supply chain management careers. In particular, the program targets the high school students of the Urban Assembly School for Global Commerce (UASGC) and the college students of the ASU Supply Chain Management Association (ASU-SCMA). High school students are partnered with college students in a year-long mentoring program that allows both parties to develop professional supply chain skills. The work of the ASU-SCMA/UASGC Outreach Program is particularly important because it provides UASGC with much needed resources to address urban poverty issues in New York using career and technical education. The Urban Assembly describes its student group as "at-risk, under-resourced youth," and of those youth: - 85% are low-income - 83% enter high school below grade level in at least one subject - 20% require Individualized Education Plans (Special Needs) (urbanassembly.org). The Outreach Program addresses the above issues by providing the high school students with collegiate mentors that develop supply chain and college readiness resources in the form of a case study, site tour, supply chain simulation and presentations. In order to be considered successful, the program must first, equip the high school mentees with tools and skills for a professional career, specifically supply chain management, that they would not otherwise be exposed to; and second, motivate the collegiate participants who are about to enter the workforce to continue to participate in mentoring throughout their careers. This program documents the efforts and results of the pilot year for the Outreach Program that took place from September 2016 through March 2017. Through this pilot program, it was determined that the ASU-SCMA/UASGC Outreach Program is effective and valuable. In fact, the program found that: - 75% of the high school students agreed or strongly agreed that the program helped them learn new business skills. - 75% of the high school students agreed that the program taught them new, interesting things about supply chain. - 75% of the high school students became more interested in college. 100% of the college mentors agreed or strongly agreed that they gained new and important supply chain and professional skills. The success of the pilot year has led to plans for the Outreach Program to become an annual project for ASU-SCMA. This is a program that will continue for the foreseeable future.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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GIS Visualization of New York City Photography Studios, ca. 1830-1880

Description

The humanities as a discipline have typically not used a rigid or technical method of assessment in the process of analysis. GIScience offers numerous benefits to this discipline by applying

The humanities as a discipline have typically not used a rigid or technical method of assessment in the process of analysis. GIScience offers numerous benefits to this discipline by applying spatial analysis to rigorously understand it. Photography studios developed in the mid-19th Century as a highly popular business and emerging technology. This project was initiated by Dr. Jeremy Rowe with support from the ASU Emeritus College Research and Creative Activity and Undergraduate Research Initiative grants, and seeks to use GIS tools to understand the explosive growth of photography studios in the New York City area, specifically Manhattan and Brooklyn. Demonstrated in this project are several capabilities of the ESRI online GIS, including queries for year information, a tool showing growth over time, and a generated density map of photography studios.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The career of Clifford Demarest (1874-1946): organist, social advocate, and educator

Description

As an organist, church musician, and educator, Clifford Demarest (1874-1946) was a prominent figure in New York during the first half of the twentieth century. However, prior to this thesis,

As an organist, church musician, and educator, Clifford Demarest (1874-1946) was a prominent figure in New York during the first half of the twentieth century. However, prior to this thesis, Demarest's place within the history of American music, like that of many of his contemporaries, was all but neglected. This research reveals Clifford Demarest as an influential figure in American musical history from around 1900 to his retirement in 1937. Led by contemporary accounts, I trace Demarest's musical influence through his three musical careers: professional organist, church musician, and educator. As a prominent figure in the fledgling American Guild of Organists, Demarest was dedicated to the unification of its members and the artistic legitimacy of the organist profession. As the organist and choir director of the Church of the Messiah, later the Community Church of New York (1911-1946, inclusive), Demarest played an integral part in the liberal atmosphere fostered by the congregation's minister, John Haynes Holmes (1879-1964). Together Holmes and Demarest directly influenced the nascent National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and supported luminaries of the Harlem Renaissance. Influential figures such as Langston Hughes (1902-1967), Augustus Granville Dill (1881-1956), Egbert Ethelred Brown (1875-1956), and Countee Cullen (1903-1946) were inspired by the liberal environment in the Church of the Messiah; however, prior to this research, their connections to the church were unexplored. As the music supervisor of Tenafly High School and later, for the state of New Jersey, Demarest influenced countless students through his passion for music. His compositions for student orchestras are among the earliest to elevate the artistic standards of school music ensembles during the first four decades of the twentieth century. Archival sources such as church records, letters, and newspaper editorials, are synthesized with current research to characterize Demarest's place in these three professional orbits of the early twentieth century. His story also represents those of countless other working musicians from his era that have been forgotten. Therefore, this research opens an important new research field – a window into the dynamic world of the American organist.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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They called me an alien: Hanns Eisler's American years, 1935-1948

Description

In the 1930s, with the rise of Nazism, many artists in Europe had to flee their homelands and sought refuge in the United States. Austrian composer Hanns Eisler who had

In the 1930s, with the rise of Nazism, many artists in Europe had to flee their homelands and sought refuge in the United States. Austrian composer Hanns Eisler who had risen to prominence as a significant composer during the Weimar era was among them. A Jew, an ardent Marxist and composer devoted to musical modernism, he had established himself as a writer of film music and Kampflieder, fighting songs, for the European workers' movement. After two visits of the United States in the mid-1930s, Eisler settled in America where he spent a decade (1938-1948), composed a considerable number of musical works, including important film scores, instrumental music and songs, and, in collaboration with Theodor W. Adorno, penned the influential treatise Composing for the Films. Yet despite his substantial contributions to American culture American scholarship on Eisler has remained sparse, perhaps due to his reputation as the "Karl Marx in Music." In this study I examine Eisler's American exile and argue that Eisler, through his roles as a musician and a teacher, actively sought to enrich American culture. I will present background for his exile years, a detailed overview of his American career as well as analyses and close readings of several of his American works, including three of his American film scores, Pete Roleum and His Cousins (1939), Hangmen Also Die (1943), and None But the Lonely Heart (1944), and the String Quartet (1940), Third Piano Sonata (1943), Woodbury Liederbüchlein (1941), and Hollywood Songbook (1942-7). This thesis builds upon unpublished correspondence and documents available only in special collections at the University of Southern California (USC), as well as film scores in archives at USC and the University of California, Los Angeles. It also draws on Eisler studies by such European scholars as Albrecht Betz, Jürgen Schebera, and Horst Weber, as well as on research of film music scholars Sally Bick and Claudia Gorbman. As there is little written on the particulars of Eisler's American years, this thesis presents new facts and new perspectives and aims at a better understanding of the artistic achievements of this composer.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Revolt, religion, and dissent in the Dutch-American Atlantic: Francis Adrian van der Kemp's pursuit of civil and religious liberty

Description

This project explores the histories of the Dutch Republic and the United States during the Age of Revolutions, using as a lens the life of Francis Adrian van der Kemp.

This project explores the histories of the Dutch Republic and the United States during the Age of Revolutions, using as a lens the life of Francis Adrian van der Kemp. Connections between the Netherlands and the United States have been understudied in histories of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Yet the nations' political and religious histories are entwined both thematically and practically. Van der Kemp's life makes it possible to examine republicanism and liberal religion anew, as they developed and changed during the era of Atlantic revolutions. The project draws on numerous archival collections that house van der Kemp's voluminous correspondence, political and religious writings, his autobiography, and the unpublished records of the Reformed Christian Church, now the Unitarian Church of Barneveld. With his activity in both countries, van der Kemp offers a unique perspective into the continued role of the Dutch in the development of the United States. The dissertation argues that the political divisions and incomplete religious freedom that frustrated van der Kemp in the Dutch Republic similarly manifested in America. Politically, the partisanship that became the hallmark of the early American republic echoed the experiences van der Kemp had during the Patriot Revolt. While parties would eventually stabilize radical politics, the collapse of the Dutch Republic in the Atlantic world and the divisiveness of American politics in those early decades, led van der Kemp to blunt his once radically democratic opinions. Heavily influenced by John Adams, he adopted a more conservative politics of balance that guaranteed religious and civil liberty regardless of governmental structure. In the realm of religion, van der Kemp discovered that American religious freedom reflected the same begrudging acceptance that constituted Dutch religious tolerance. Van der Kemp found that even in one of the most pluralistic states, New York, his belief in the unlimited liberty of conscience remained a dissenting opinion. The democracy and individualism celebrated in early American politics were controversial in religion, given the growing authority of denominations and hierarchical church institutions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The role of informal transit in New York City: a case study of commuter vans in Eastern Queens

Description

Informal public transport is commonplace in the developing world, but the service exists in the United States as well, and is understudied. Often called "dollar vans", New York's commuter vans

Informal public transport is commonplace in the developing world, but the service exists in the United States as well, and is understudied. Often called "dollar vans", New York's commuter vans serve approximately 120,000 people every day (King and Goldwyn, 2014). While this is a tiny fraction of the New York transit rider population, it is comparable to the total number of commuters who ride transit in smaller cities such as Minneapolis/St Paul and Phoenix. The first part of this study reports on the use of commuter vans in Eastern Queens based on a combination of surveys and a ridership tally, all conducted in summer 2016. It answers four research questions: How many people ride the vans? Who rides the commuter vans? Why do they ride commuter vans? Do commuter vans complement or compete against formal transit? Commuter van ridership in Eastern Queens was approximately 55,000 with a high percentage of female ridership. Time and cost savings were the main factors influencing commuter van ridership. Possession of a MetroCard was shown to negatively affect the frequency of commuter van ridership. The results show evidence of commuter vans playing both a competing and complementary role to MTA bus and subway transit. The second part of this study presents a SWOT analysis results of commuter vans, and the policy implications. It answers 2 research questions: What are the main strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of commuter vans in Eastern Queens? and How do the current policies, rules and regulations affect commuter van operation? The SWOT analysis results show that the commuter van industry is resilient, performs a necessary service, and, with small adjustments that will help reduce operating costs and loss of profits have a chance of thriving in Eastern Queens and the rest of New York City. The study also discusses the mismatch between policy and practice offering recommendations for improvement to ensure that commuter vans continue to serve residents of New York City.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017