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Confidentiality protection of user data and adaptive resource allocation for managing multiple workflow performance in service-based systems

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In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive

In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive data is sent in unencrypted forms to remote machines owned and operated by third-party service providers, there are risks of unauthorized use of the users' sensitive data by service providers. Although there are many techniques for protecting users' data from outside attackers, currently there is no effective way to protect users' sensitive data from service providers. In this dissertation, an approach is presented to protecting the confidentiality of users' data from service providers, and ensuring that service providers cannot collect users' confidential data while the data is processed or stored in cloud computing systems. The approach has four major features: (1) separation of software service providers and infrastructure service providers, (2) hiding the information of the owners of data, (3) data obfuscation, and (4) software module decomposition and distributed execution. Since the approach to protecting users' data confidentiality includes software module decomposition and distributed execution, it is very important to effectively allocate the resource of servers in SBS to each of the software module to manage the overall performance of workflows in SBS. An approach is presented to resource allocation for SBS to adaptively allocating the system resources of servers to their software modules in runtime in order to satisfy the performance requirements of multiple workflows in SBS. Experimental results show that the dynamic resource allocation approach can substantially increase the throughput of a SBS and the optimal resource allocation can be found in polynomial time

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Date Created
2012

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Techniques for Decentralized and Dynamic Resource Allocation

Description

This thesis investigates three different resource allocation problems, aiming to achieve two common goals: i) adaptivity to a fast-changing environment, ii) distribution of the computation tasks to achieve a favorable solution. The motivation for this work relies on the modern-era

This thesis investigates three different resource allocation problems, aiming to achieve two common goals: i) adaptivity to a fast-changing environment, ii) distribution of the computation tasks to achieve a favorable solution. The motivation for this work relies on the modern-era proliferation of sensors and devices, in the Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) layer of the Internet of Things (IoT) architecture. To avoid congestion and enable low-latency services, limits have to be imposed on the amount of decisions that can be centralized (i.e. solved in the ``cloud") and/or amount of control information that devices can exchange. This has been the motivation to develop i) a lightweight PHY Layer protocol for time synchronization and scheduling in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), ii) an adaptive receiver that enables Sub-Nyquist sampling, for efficient spectrum sensing at high frequencies, and iii) an SDN-scheme for resource-sharing across different technologies and operators, to harmoniously and holistically respond to fluctuations in demands at the eNodeB' s layer.

The proposed solution for time synchronization and scheduling is a new protocol, called PulseSS, which is completely event-driven and is inspired by biological networks. The results on convergence and accuracy for locally connected networks, presented in this thesis, constitute the theoretical foundation for the protocol in terms of performance guarantee. The derived limits provided guidelines for ad-hoc solutions in the actual implementation of the protocol.

The proposed receiver for Compressive Spectrum Sensing (CSS) aims at tackling the noise folding phenomenon, e.g., the accumulation of noise from different sub-bands that are folded, prior to sampling and baseband processing, when an analog front-end aliasing mixer is utilized.

The sensing phase design has been conducted via a utility maximization approach, thus the scheme derived has been called Cognitive Utility Maximization Multiple Access (CUMMA).

The framework described in the last part of the thesis is inspired by stochastic network optimization tools and dynamics.

While convergence of the proposed approach remains an open problem, the numerical results here presented suggest the capability of the algorithm to handle traffic fluctuations across operators, while respecting different time and economic constraints.

The scheme has been named Decomposition of Infrastructure-based Dynamic Resource Allocation (DIDRA).

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Date Created
2017

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Performance Analysis of Low-Complexity Resource-Allocation Algorithms in Stochastic Networks Using Fluid Models

Description

Resource allocation in communication networks aims to assign various resources such as power, bandwidth and load in a fair and economic fashion so that the networks can be better utilized and shared by the communicating entities. The design of efficient

Resource allocation in communication networks aims to assign various resources such as power, bandwidth and load in a fair and economic fashion so that the networks can be better utilized and shared by the communicating entities. The design of efficient resource-allocation algorithms is, however, becoming more and more challenging due to the precipitously increasing scale of the networks. This thesis strives to understand how to design such low-complexity algorithms with performance guarantees.

In the first part, the link scheduling problem in wireless ad hoc networks is considered. The scheduler is charge of finding a set of wireless data links to activate at each time slot with the considerations of wireless interference, traffic dynamics, network topology and quality-of-service (QoS) requirements. Two different yet essential scenarios are investigated: the first one is when each packet has a specific deadline after which it will be discarded; the second is when each packet traverses the network in multiple hops instead of leaving the network after a one-hop transmission. In both scenarios the links need to be carefully scheduled to avoid starvation of users and congestion on links. One greedy algorithm is analyzed in each of the two scenarios and performance guarantees in terms of throughput of the networks are derived.

In the second part, the load-balancing problem in parallel computing is studied. Tasks arrive in batches and the duty of the load balancer is to place the tasks on the machines such that minimum queueing delay is incurred. Due to the huge size of modern data centers, sampling the status of all machines may result in significant overhead. Consequently, an algorithm based on limited queue information at the machines is examined and its asymptotic delay performance is characterized and it is shown that the proposed algorithm achieves the same delay with remarkably less sampling overhead compared to the well-known power-of-two-choices algorithm.

Two messages of the thesis are the following: greedy algorithms can work well in a stochastic setting; the fluid model can be useful in "derandomizing" the system and reveal the nature of the algorithm.

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Date Created
2015

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Optimal power allocation and scheduling of real-time data for cognitive radios

Description

In this dissertation, I propose potential techniques to improve the quality-of-service (QoS) of real-time applications in cognitive radio (CR) systems. Unlike best-effort applications, real-time applications, such as audio and video, have a QoS that need to be met. There are

In this dissertation, I propose potential techniques to improve the quality-of-service (QoS) of real-time applications in cognitive radio (CR) systems. Unlike best-effort applications, real-time applications, such as audio and video, have a QoS that need to be met. There are two different frameworks that are used to study the QoS in the literature, namely, the average-delay and the hard-deadline frameworks. In the former, the scheduling algorithm has to guarantee that the packet's average delay is below a prespecified threshold while the latter imposes a hard deadline on each packet in the system. In this dissertation, I present joint power allocation and scheduling algorithms for each framework and show their applications in CR systems which are known to have strict power limitations so as to protect the licensed users from interference.

A common aspect of the two frameworks is the packet service time. Thus, the effect of multiple channels on the service time is studied first. The problem is formulated as an optimal stopping rule problem where it is required to decide at which channel the SU should stop sensing and begin transmission. I provide a closed-form expression for this optimal stopping rule and the optimal transmission power of secondary user (SU).

The average-delay framework is then presented in a single CR channel system with a base station (BS) that schedules the SUs to minimize the average delay while protecting the primary users (PUs) from harmful interference. One of the contributions of the proposed algorithm is its suitability for heterogeneous-channels systems where users with statistically low channel quality suffer worse delay performances. The proposed algorithm guarantees the prespecified delay performance to each SU without violating the PU's interference constraint.

Finally, in the hard-deadline framework, I propose three algorithms that maximize the system's throughput while guaranteeing the required percentage of packets to be transmitted by their deadlines. The proposed algorithms work in heterogeneous systems where the BS is serving different types of users having real-time (RT) data and non-real-time (NRT) data. I show that two of the proposed algorithms have the low complexity where the power policies of both the RT and NRT users are in closed-form expressions and a low-complexity scheduler.

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Created

Date Created
2016