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Confidentiality protection of user data and adaptive resource allocation for managing multiple workflow performance in service-based systems

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In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive

In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive data is sent in unencrypted forms to remote machines owned and operated by third-party service providers, there are risks of unauthorized use of the users' sensitive data by service providers. Although there are many techniques for protecting users' data from outside attackers, currently there is no effective way to protect users' sensitive data from service providers. In this dissertation, an approach is presented to protecting the confidentiality of users' data from service providers, and ensuring that service providers cannot collect users' confidential data while the data is processed or stored in cloud computing systems. The approach has four major features: (1) separation of software service providers and infrastructure service providers, (2) hiding the information of the owners of data, (3) data obfuscation, and (4) software module decomposition and distributed execution. Since the approach to protecting users' data confidentiality includes software module decomposition and distributed execution, it is very important to effectively allocate the resource of servers in SBS to each of the software module to manage the overall performance of workflows in SBS. An approach is presented to resource allocation for SBS to adaptively allocating the system resources of servers to their software modules in runtime in order to satisfy the performance requirements of multiple workflows in SBS. Experimental results show that the dynamic resource allocation approach can substantially increase the throughput of a SBS and the optimal resource allocation can be found in polynomial time

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2012

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Modeling, analysis, and efficient resource allocation in cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructure networks

Description

The critical infrastructures of the nation are a large and complex network of human, physical and cyber-physical systems. In recent times, it has become increasingly apparent that individual critical infrastructures, such as the power and communication networks, do not operate

The critical infrastructures of the nation are a large and complex network of human, physical and cyber-physical systems. In recent times, it has become increasingly apparent that individual critical infrastructures, such as the power and communication networks, do not operate in isolation, but instead are part of a complex interdependent ecosystem where a failure involving a small set of network entities can trigger a cascading event resulting in the failure of a much larger set of entities through the failure propagation process.

Recognizing the need for a deeper understanding of the interdependent relationships between such critical infrastructures, several models have been proposed and analyzed in the last few years. However, most of these models are over-simplified and fail to capture the complex interdependencies that may exist between critical infrastructures. To overcome the limitations of existing models, this dissertation presents a new model -- the Implicative Interdependency Model (IIM) that is able to capture such complex interdependency relations. As the potential for a failure cascade in critical interdependent networks poses several risks that can jeopardize the nation, this dissertation explores relevant research problems in the interdependent power and communication networks using the proposed IIM and lays the foundations for further study using this model.

Apart from exploring problems in interdependent critical infrastructures, this dissertation also explores resource allocation techniques for environments enabled with cyber-physical systems. Specifically, the problem of efficient path planning for data collection using mobile cyber-physical systems is explored. Two such environments are considered: a Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID) environment with mobile “Tags” and “Readers”, and a sensor data collection environment where both the sensors and the data mules (data collectors) are mobile.

Finally, from an applied research perspective, this dissertation presents Raptor, an advanced network planning and management tool for mitigating the impact of spatially correlated, or region based faults on infrastructure networks. Raptor consolidates a wide range of studies conducted in the last few years on region based faults, and provides an interface for network planners, designers and operators to use the results of these studies for designing robust and resilient networks in the presence of spatially correlated faults.

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Date Created
2016