Matching Items (8)

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Factors Affecting Students' Capabilities to Pursue a STEM Field

Description

This paper explores factors to study why the number of students in STEM are not as high as they could be. Based on both Veda and Soumya's personal experiences, factors

This paper explores factors to study why the number of students in STEM are not as high as they could be. Based on both Veda and Soumya's personal experiences, factors were chosen to understand their impact on whether a high school student would choose a STEM major in their college of choice, which could lead them to having a career in STEM. The factors explored will be location, grade level, school, parent/guardian involvement, teacher involvement, media influences, and personal interest. Data was collected through surveys sent to both high school and college students. The high school data came solely from schools in the Phoenix area, whereas college students' data came from across the world. These surveys contained questions regarding all of the above factors and were crafted so that we could gain further insight into each factor without producing bias. Each factor had at least one personal experience by either Veda or Soumya. Many of the survey responses gave insight to how and why a student would decide to pursue STEM or why they did pursue STEM. The main implications derived from the study are the following: the importance of a good support network, active parent/guardian and teacher involvement, and specifically active science teacher involvement. Data from both college and high school students showed that students highly valued a science teacher. One recommendation from this thesis is to provide a training for teachers to learn about how to connect concepts they teach to real-world applications. This can be administered through the district so that they may bring in anyone they feel is qualified to teach such topics such as industry professionals or teachers who specialize in teaching STEM. The last recommendation is for parents to participate in a workshop that will inform them of how to be more involved/engaged with their student.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Education in the Hispanic Community

Description

This project largely focuses on the Latino population and how Hispanic parents should become more involved with their student's education in order to have them prosper in today's society.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Parental Involvement in Title I Schools: Examining Perspectives of Parents & Teachers

Description

ABSTRACT

Parental involvement is vital to student success academically as well as socially (Jeynes, 2007; Kim & Hill, 2015). The purpose of this mixed-methods action research study was to examine

ABSTRACT

Parental involvement is vital to student success academically as well as socially (Jeynes, 2007; Kim & Hill, 2015). The purpose of this mixed-methods action research study was to examine the perceptions of parental involvement of parents and teachers in a Title I school. A training session intervention, Social Hour, was designed using the Heath and Heath change model (2010) to create an opportunity to learn about parental involvement and educate the school community on the Epstein’s six-types of parental involvement (Epstein, 1987). The goal of the Social Hour workshop was to address the challenges and barriers to parental involvement, previously listed in the literature. Using the lens of Critical Race theory (Blalock, 1967) ensured that the research gives a voice to those who are often marginalized while also helping parents and teachers build a relationship of trust and understanding using principles of Community of Practice (Wenger, 2009). The results of this study indicate that Social Hour-type learning events are significant in the change to perceptions of parental involvement. The participants had a lower level of confidence at the beginning of the session than at the end. Additional qualitative results also suggest a change in attitude after attending the Social Hour. Participants noted they had more energy about parental involvement and were encouraged that parental involvement does not require them to volunteer more; that it is more about being engaged in their child’s education. Overall, participants reported an increase in confidence and had a positive view of parental involvement based on attending the Social Hour workshop.

Keywords: Parental involvement, Critical Race theory, Epstein Six Types of Parental involvement

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Parents' perspectives in their child's education in two-parent households

Description

The purpose of the research study was to explore the perceptions of Navajo mothers and Navajo fathers in the development and childrearing practices of their children and to what extent

The purpose of the research study was to explore the perceptions of Navajo mothers and Navajo fathers in the development and childrearing practices of their children and to what extent each parent was involved in their children by gender and age. The objective of the interviews was to capture the perceptions of each parent as to child development and childrearing practices as well as the beliefs that they have on parental involvement. In the current study, the interviews provided information regarding attitudes and perceptions of parental involvement from the Navajo mothers and the Navajo fathers who participated in the study. By using probing questions, deeper insights into the understanding and perceptions of parental involvement were obtained.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Parental involvement in three New Mexico pre-schools

Description

The statement that all children will learn, grow, and develop to realize their full potential referenced continuously by educators seems to have little impact on schools in numerous school districts

The statement that all children will learn, grow, and develop to realize their full potential referenced continuously by educators seems to have little impact on schools in numerous school districts across the country. The Early Childhood Education programs continue to dwindle down and are the first to be cut from the budget, such as the pre-school/Early Childhood programs in each school. Administrators and policymakers tend to focus on the latter years instead of the early childhood years which are from pre-natal to eight. There have been few research studies on early childhood education in regard to family unit activities. Research does say that parents who are active in their child’s learning and school activities are positively associated with learning and school outcomes. Many parents take matters into their own hands and have started to prepare their children for school readiness and are not leaving it to the school system. This topic is the focus of this research: How parents get involved and what kinds of activities they do with their children to prepare them for school life. Twenty-five questions with sub questions were compiled in a survey that was administered to a sample of parents in three schools in the Gallup McKinley County School District located in Gallup, New Mexico, a small community with a population of 21,678 and over 100 diverse cultures.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Using funds of knowledge to build trust between a teacher and parents of language-delayed preschoolers

Description

Preschool children with language delays often struggle to learn new concepts. Proven strategies such as modeling, prompting, reinforcing responses, direct teaching, and hands-on experience matter to young children with language

Preschool children with language delays often struggle to learn new concepts. Proven strategies such as modeling, prompting, reinforcing responses, direct teaching, and hands-on experience matter to young children with language delays. Also important are social interactions and shared experiences with more knowledgeable persons. Within a cultural context Funds of Knowledge, that is the talents, traditions, and abilities families possess and pass down to their children may be a context for these. However, despite their importance the value Funds of Knowledge have has not been explored with parents of children with special needs. This action research study used a mixed-methods design to understand if Funds of Knowledge could be used as context to improve communication between parents and their children and build trust between parents and a teacher. Seven families participated in the study. Quantitative data were gathered with surveys and were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Qualitative data consisted of transcripts from home-visit interviews, parent presentations, and a focus group, and were analyzed with a grounded theory approach. Results indicate parents entered the study with trust in the teacher especially in terms of having competence in her abilities. Data also show that parents used the language strategies provided to improve communication with their children. Data also indicate that the use of a Funds of Knowledge activity allowed parents to share their knowledge and interests with their children and children in the classroom, feel empowered, and express emotions. From these findings, implication for practice and further research are provided.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Latino parent perspectives on parental involvement in elementary schools

Description

ABSTRACT The purpose of this research is to provide insight into immigrant Latino parents' perspectives on parental involvement in elementary school settings as influenced by the Title I Family Literacy

ABSTRACT The purpose of this research is to provide insight into immigrant Latino parents' perspectives on parental involvement in elementary school settings as influenced by the Title I Family Literacy Program (TFLP). A comparison is made of Latino parents who have been participating in the TFLP for more than one year, participants new to the program and Latino parents who chose not to participate in the TFLP. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected via a survey and individual interviews of randomly selected members of each comparison group. All research participants were immigrant Latino parents with children at one of ten Title I elementary schools operating a TFLP. The schools are part of a large, urban school district in the Southwest. Findings indicate the TFLP has a positive effect on parental involvement practices of immigrant Latino parents. Participating parents showed increased confidence in their ability to support their children's education and program participants are more engaged in school activities. The results of this study imply participation in the program for one year or more has the most impact on families. Parents who participated for more than one year communicated a high sense of responsibility toward their influence on their child's education and upbringing and an understanding of strategies needed to effectively support their children. This research also identifies barriers parents face to participation in the TFLP and parental involvement in general. Implementation of family literacy programs in other districts would need to follow guidelines similar to this TFLP to achieve comparable results. More research is needed on the effects of this program on parents, children, and school staff.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Parent-teacher partnership: workshops to support family engagement in student reading comprehension

Description

During the winter semester of 2018, I conducted a series of four workshops to teach parents (n = 6) strategies that could be used from home with their fourth-grade struggling

During the winter semester of 2018, I conducted a series of four workshops to teach parents (n = 6) strategies that could be used from home with their fourth-grade struggling readers. This study was situated in an elementary school located in North Las Vegas, NV. I invited students that scored two or more years below grade level, as indicated by the STAR Reading Assessment (a grade equivalency assessment).

The purpose of this study focused on how family engagement resulting from the implementation of four small group workshops delivered by the teacher (and researcher) could affect reading performance of students who were below grade level.

This mixed-methods action research study was informed by Bourdieu’s Theory of Cultural Capital (1977), Bandura’s Theory of Self-efficacy (1986), and school, family, and community partnership models.

Quantitative data included pre- and post-intervention parent surveys, post-intervention student surveys, and pre- and post-intervention student reading assessments. Qualitative data included field notes and post-intervention parent interviews.

A repeated-measure t-test found the difference between student pre- and post-assessment to be statistically significant, t(9) = -3.38, p = 0.008. Findings also indicated that parents utilized the skills learned, increased their self-efficacy in regards to family involvement, and overcame obstacles.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019