Matching Items (3)

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Conservation Conundrum: Living Religiously through Sustainability and Liberation Theology

Description

This thesis reflects on how we understand the psyche, religion, and care for the Earth and the suffering Other. Through a hermeneutic walk through the works of Martin Heidegger, John

This thesis reflects on how we understand the psyche, religion, and care for the Earth and the suffering Other. Through a hermeneutic walk through the works of Martin Heidegger, John D. Caputo, and Friedrich Nietzsche, we come to have an understanding of the incredible importance of words, language, and stories. Technological language is taken as a threat to what makes humans unique, if it makes us say that what matters most must be able to be measured. The myth of Cupid and Psyche leads us to an understanding that the psyche is made of words, and that stories are true, not factual. The way in which meditative thinking requires us to open to other ideas leads us to postmodernism. A discussion of Pope Francis's encyclical, "Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home," aims to persuade Catholics that climate change is a complex and real issue worthy of our attention. As people of faith, we must acknowledge our sins against the Earth and against the poor. We have the power to create positive change, yet we waste our resources. Evidence is given that the poor are effected at a greater degree by climate change. Liberation theology is discussed as one way Catholics can care for the suffering Other. Through my reading of Caputo's "On Religion," we are all more religious than we think, and therefore must all play a part in the care of our common home. A new and more inclusive conversation from a place of love about all of these issues is needed to create revolutionary change.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Radical welcome in youth performance spaces on Chicago's south side: the child as hungry, the child as village, the child as visible

Description

My project maps assets of welcome in the built environment in youth performing arts spaces. What signifiers reveal how a physical space conceptualizes the child, reflects professed theological claims, and

My project maps assets of welcome in the built environment in youth performing arts spaces. What signifiers reveal how a physical space conceptualizes the child, reflects professed theological claims, and cues youth to practice ownership and experience belonging? I explore the cultural capital that emerges from the sites and I assert theological implications of the findings. Through mixed qualitative, quantitative, and arts-based methods, I employ asset-based and cultural mapping tools to collect data. I parse theories of space, race, and capital. Half of the ten sites are faith-based; others make room for practices that participants bring to the table. Therefore, I discuss theologies and theories about racialized, religious, public, and arts spaces. My research shows that one ethnographic task for the arts groups is unearthing and embedding neighborhood legacy. I source fifty-six written youth questionnaires, forty youth in focus groups, staff questionnaires, parent interviews, and observations across fourteen months at ten sites. Interpreting the data required that I reconceive multiple terms, including “youth dedicated,” “partnership,” and art itself. The research codes spatial, relational, economic, temporal, and comfort-level assets. Observed assets include strategies for physical safety, gender inclusivity, literary agility, entrepreneurship, advocacy, and healing. Analyzing data showed the sites as conceptualizing the child in three change-making areas: the Child as Hungry, the Child as Village, and the Child as Visible. The Child as Hungry emerged because participants self-report myriad “feeding” physically, spiritually, and artistically at each site. Youth participants at each site maintain a Village presence, and each site offers a manner of gathering space that signifies Village responsibility. Each site carves space to witness the child, contrastingly with other spheres—so much so that being a Visible Child becomes a craft itself, added alongside the fine art. Child theology is the primary theoretical lens that I use to contribute to and intersect with performance studies theory, critical race theory, child drama, and childhood studies.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Dynamic secularisms: Christianity and the struggle for human rights in the Uruguayan Laïcité

Description

From 1973 to 1984 the people of Uruguay lived under a repressive military dictatorship. During that time, the Uruguayan government violated the Human Rights of its opponents and critics through

From 1973 to 1984 the people of Uruguay lived under a repressive military dictatorship. During that time, the Uruguayan government violated the Human Rights of its opponents and critics through prolonged imprisonment in inhumane conditions without trial, physical and psychological torture, disappearance, and a negation of freedom of speech, thought and congregation. In this project, I argue that these violations of Human Rights committed by the military dictatorship added urgency to the rethinking by religious individuals of the Uruguayan model of secularism, the laïcité, and the role that their theology required them to play in the "secular" world. Influenced by the Liberation Theology movement, Catholic and Protestant leaders simultaneously made use of and challenged the secularization model in order to carve a space for themselves in the struggle for the protection of Human Rights.

Furthermore, I will argue that due to the Uruguayan system of partitocracy, which privileges political parties as the main voices in public matters, Uruguay still carries this history of Human Rights violations on its back. Had alternative views been heard in the public sphere, this thorny history might have been dealt with in a fairer manner. Thus, I call for further exploration of the "intelligent laïcité" model, which might ensure true democratic participation in the public sphere.

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Date Created
  • 2015