Matching Items (5)

134633-Thumbnail Image.png

(im)permanence: Public Art and Placemaking in Downtown Phoenix

Description

This project, (im)permanence, aims to analyze the impact of temporary and permanent public art in downtown Phoenix through the voices of various artists, curators, city officials and art managers. Downtown

This project, (im)permanence, aims to analyze the impact of temporary and permanent public art in downtown Phoenix through the voices of various artists, curators, city officials and art managers. Downtown Phoenix has seen rapid change and an influx of growth and development in recent years, yet its vibrant arts scene still characterizes and helps define much of the area. This project consists of five profile stories about public works of art downtown, organized on a scale of permanent to temporary. The stories feature the artists discussing the impact of their work in the public realm, the benefits and drawbacks of both temporary and permanent work, and the role public art plays amid downtown's many changes. The pieces and programs included in (im)permanence are the sculpture Her Secret is Patience at Civic Space Park, the forthcoming Wallace and Ladmo statue and Civic Space Park, the Three Birds in Flight Mural on Roosevelt Row, the public art incorporated into Valley Metro's light rail stops, and the temporary art projects of Scottsdale Public Art's IN FLUX program. These pieces, as determined by Leslie-Jean Thornton and myself, represent a microcosm of the temporary and permanent public art in the area, and showcase a range of stories emblematic of the character of downtown Phoenix. The design of the website features animations indicative of the temporary nature of the pieces -- elements fade in incrementally based on their degree of "permanence." This website was made using wix.com, and it incorporates multimedia elements such as photos, photo galleries, an infographic, and a photo slider. Website URL https://sundevilsgirl.wixsite.com/impermanence

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

135927-Thumbnail Image.png

Steps for Improving Quality of Placemaking on Roosevelt Row

Description

Surrounded by a developmental boom in downtown Phoenix, Roosevelt Row fights to maintain the local art influence and historic character. An earthy community of street artists, coffee drinkers, band tees,

Surrounded by a developmental boom in downtown Phoenix, Roosevelt Row fights to maintain the local art influence and historic character. An earthy community of street artists, coffee drinkers, band tees, nose rings, vinyl collectors and rolled denim, the people are facing dramatic urbanization. The hum of drills, hammers, cranes and alarms sound throughout the viscidity, echoing the construction of a new era downtown. In the interest of better understanding the developmental process, resident needs and community, this research project evaluates successful public spaces and similar downtown areas in the United States, synthesized their elements of prosperity in comparison to general attributes of quality public spaces, and implemented the concepts and ideas into Roosevelt Row. This provided the researcher with knowledge of quality public spaces, why public space is important, and how placemaking is routinely accomplished. This also equipped the researcher with the tools to participate in ethnography and collect observational data to learn about Roosevelt Row. The researcher then combined learned material with what she observed on the Row, to condense the artists' district developmental needs into nine proposals for bettering the Row in the immediate, near and long-term future. The study begs to answer the question: is Roosevelt Row a Place or a place? Observation, residential and visitor engagement with the space; locality, pleasurability, inclusiveness and safety of the public spaces; and relationship between residents and quality of space all contribute to the space's qualifications. While Roosevelt Row has the potential and assets to become a Place, especially if the nine proposals are implemented. However, at the time of research, the space is between place and Place.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

155478-Thumbnail Image.png

Casas Montezumas: chorographies, ancient ruins, and placemaking in the Salt and Gila River valleys, Arizona, 1694-1868

Description

This dissertation uses the narrative practice of chorography as a genre for assessing the history of placemaking in the Salt and Gila River region of central Arizona from the late

This dissertation uses the narrative practice of chorography as a genre for assessing the history of placemaking in the Salt and Gila River region of central Arizona from the late seventeenth century through the mid-nineteenth century. Chorography concerns the descriptive representation of places in the world, usually of regions associated with a particular nation. Traditionally, chorography has served as a written method for describing geographical places as they existed historically. By integrating descriptions of natural features with descriptions of built features, such as ancient ruins, chorography infuses the physical landscape with cultural and historical meaning. This dissertation relies on a body of Spanish- and English-language chorographies produced across three centuries to interpret how Euro-American descriptions of Hohokam ruins in the Salt and Gila River valleys shaped local placemaking. Importantly, the disparate chorographic texts produced during the late-seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries reflect ‘discursive continuity’—a continuity of thought spanning a long and frequently disregarded period in the history of central Arizona, in which ruminations about the ruins of ancient cities and irrigation canals formed the basis for what people knew, or thought they knew, about the little-known region. When settlers arrived in the newly-formed Arizona Territory in the 1860s to establish permanent settlement in the Salt and Gila River valleys, they brought with them a familiarity with these writings, maps, and other chorographical materials. On one hand, Arizonans viewed the ancient ruins as literal evidence for the region’s agricultural possibilities. On the other hand, Aztec and Cíbola myths associated with the ruins, told and retold by Europeans and Americans during the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, offered an imaginative context for the establishment and promotion of American settlement in central Arizona.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

158327-Thumbnail Image.png

Scarlet Macaws, Long-Distance Exchange, and Placemaking in the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest, ca 900-1450 CE

Description

Exchange is fundamental to the establishment and maintenance of social institutions and political economies in all scales of societies. While today people rapidly exchange goods and information over great distances,

Exchange is fundamental to the establishment and maintenance of social institutions and political economies in all scales of societies. While today people rapidly exchange goods and information over great distances, in the past, long-distance exchange necessitated the mobilization of vast networks of interaction with substantial transport costs. Objects traded over long distances were often valuable and challenging to obtain, granting them multifaceted significance that is difficult to understand using traditional archaeological approaches.

This research examines human interactions with scarlet macaws (Ara macao) in the United States (U.S.) Southwest and Mexican Northwest (SW/NW) between 900 and 1450 CE. This period saw large-scale cultural change in the form of migrations, rapid population aggregation, and an expansion of long-distance exchange relations in regional centers at Pueblo Bonito (900-1150 CE) in northwestern New Mexico, Wupatki (1085-1220 CE) in north-central Arizona, and Paquimé (1200-1450 CE) in northern Chihuahua. Despite the distant natural habitat of scarlet macaws, their importation, exchange, and sacrifice appear to have played integral roles in the process of placemaking at these three regional centers. Here, I use an Archaeology of the Human Experience approach and combine radiogenic strontium isotope analysis with detailed contextual analyses using a Material Histories theoretical framework to (1) discern whether macaws discovered in the SW/NW were imported or raised locally, (2) characterize the acquisition, treatment and deposition of macaws at Pueblo Bonito, Wupatki, and Paquimé, and (3) identify patterns of continuity or change in acquisition and deposition of macaws over time and across space in the SW/NW.

Findings from radiogenic strontium isotope analysis indicate that scarlet macaws from all case studies were primarily raised locally in the SW/NW, though at Paquimé, macaws were procured from sites in the Casas Grandes region and extra-regionally. Variation in the treatment and deposition of scarlet macaws suggests that despite their prevalence, macaws were interpreted and interacted with in distinctly local ways. Examination of the human experience of transporting and raising macaws reveals previously unconsidered challenges for keeping macaws. Overall, variation in the acquisition and deposition of scarlet macaws indicates changing strategies for placemaking in the SW/NW between 900 and 1450 CE.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

151727-Thumbnail Image.png

Canal oriented development as an urban waterfront development mechanism

Description

Canal oriented development (COD) is a placemaking concept that aims to create mixed use developments along canal banks using the image and utility of the waterfront as a natural attraction

Canal oriented development (COD) is a placemaking concept that aims to create mixed use developments along canal banks using the image and utility of the waterfront as a natural attraction for social and economic activity. COD has the potential to for landlocked cities, which are lacking a traditional harbor, to pursue waterfront development which has become an important economic development source in the post-industrial city. This dissertation examines how COD as a placemaking technique can and has been used in creating urban development. This topic is analyzed via three separate yet interconnecting papers. The first paper explores the historical notion of canals as an urban economic development tool with particular attention paid to the Erie Canal. The second paper explores the feasibility of what it would take for canal development to occur in the Phoenix region. The third and final paper explores the importance of place in urban design and the success or nonsuccess of COD as a place maker through the examination of three different CODs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013