Matching Items (5)

134671-Thumbnail Image.png

Understanding the Various Uses of Urban Green Space: How Public Parks Contribute to Hedonic Happiness in Downtown Phoenix

Description

Research has long supported the idea that parks contribute to physical and mental well-being. Evidence has shown that the presence of parks reduces stress, positively impacts health, and can lower

Research has long supported the idea that parks contribute to physical and mental well-being. Evidence has shown that the presence of parks reduces stress, positively impacts health, and can lower the risk of crime in neighborhoods. There have been studies that discuss variables that impact the accessibility and quality of parks in neighborhoods such as ethnicity, income, and gender. More recently, research has delved into the impact of parks on individual's happiness. Findings imply that the desire for happiness may be satisfied by park visitation and provide evidence that suggests the diversity of park activities is a significant contributor to happiness. This study aims to identify how varying park designs contribute to individual happiness. Three hypotheses are presented: 1) frequency of park visits is positively correlated with life satisfaction, 2) park structure impacts efficacy of parks to promote happiness, and 3) adults travel to parks specifically to improve their mood. Hypothesis 1 is used to understand the relationship between park visitation and overall satisfaction, hypothesis 2 aims to identify how the physical structure of the park contributes to personal happiness, and hypothesis 3 provides an understanding for what motivates adults to visit parks. This study's results indicate that there is no significant correlation between frequency of park visits and life satisfaction, nor is there a significant correlation between physical park structure and increased happiness. While an insignificant amount of participants reported traveling to parks specifically to enhance their mood, the majority of participants indicated traveling to the park to participate in an activity that positively affects their happiness. This study can act as a tool for urban planners to get an idea of why people visit parks and which features they use while they're there. This information can provide guidance when deciding what to include in future parks, utilizing their budget in a way that maximizes community use and happiness.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

134633-Thumbnail Image.png

(im)permanence: Public Art and Placemaking in Downtown Phoenix

Description

This project, (im)permanence, aims to analyze the impact of temporary and permanent public art in downtown Phoenix through the voices of various artists, curators, city officials and art managers. Downtown

This project, (im)permanence, aims to analyze the impact of temporary and permanent public art in downtown Phoenix through the voices of various artists, curators, city officials and art managers. Downtown Phoenix has seen rapid change and an influx of growth and development in recent years, yet its vibrant arts scene still characterizes and helps define much of the area. This project consists of five profile stories about public works of art downtown, organized on a scale of permanent to temporary. The stories feature the artists discussing the impact of their work in the public realm, the benefits and drawbacks of both temporary and permanent work, and the role public art plays amid downtown's many changes. The pieces and programs included in (im)permanence are the sculpture Her Secret is Patience at Civic Space Park, the forthcoming Wallace and Ladmo statue and Civic Space Park, the Three Birds in Flight Mural on Roosevelt Row, the public art incorporated into Valley Metro's light rail stops, and the temporary art projects of Scottsdale Public Art's IN FLUX program. These pieces, as determined by Leslie-Jean Thornton and myself, represent a microcosm of the temporary and permanent public art in the area, and showcase a range of stories emblematic of the character of downtown Phoenix. The design of the website features animations indicative of the temporary nature of the pieces -- elements fade in incrementally based on their degree of "permanence." This website was made using wix.com, and it incorporates multimedia elements such as photos, photo galleries, an infographic, and a photo slider. Website URL https://sundevilsgirl.wixsite.com/impermanence

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

135944-Thumbnail Image.png

An Examination of Downtown Phoenix Business Development 2004-2013 in Context of Light Rail and Arizona State University

Description

This report examines the transformation of downtown Phoenix businesses between 2004 and 2013. The main factors at play during that time period are the introduction of Arizona State University to

This report examines the transformation of downtown Phoenix businesses between 2004 and 2013. The main factors at play during that time period are the introduction of Arizona State University to the downtown area, and the construction of Valley Metro Light Rail and the bulk of data was gleaned from US Census and City of Phoenix reports. During the period of the study, downtown Phoenix saw a shift toward more restaurants and arts and away from professional, technical and financial services. Food services jumped from eight to 12 percent of total businesses, while professional services declined from 32 to 29 percent. Certain business sectors were affected by the Recession, while others were seemingly impervious to the economic downturn. Of the sectors that saw the most growth through the period, restaurants were the most highly correlated with growth in ASU enrollment at 0.95 R. Meanwhile, the total number of businesses downtown decreased slightly, representing a negative correlation with ASU. However, the decline was so slight that ASU growth fails to account for the stagnation. Light rail ridership in the downtown area is not, on its own, highly correlated with downtown business growth. Only the Van Buren Junction, which includes both the Central and 1st Avenue stops, shows the same degree of correlation with businesses as ASU enrollment. Growth in ridership at the Van Buren Junction represents the vast majority of light rail growth in the area, and it is almost entirely linked to the spike in ASU enrollment. This suggests that ASU enrollment is a much more significant driver of business transformation than light rail. Neither ASU nor light rail can explain the totality of every shift in the downtown business landscape, but in certain sectors, namely restaurants and the arts, the extremely high correlations suggest a near indisputable connection. Because this system does not allow for the upload of excel, appendixes are available at: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B6y9cOb9sqVnMHdzalNOSmxuZFE&usp…

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

137548-Thumbnail Image.png

Revitalizing the Westward Ho: Engaging the Downtown Phoenix Community

Description

This thesis is a proposal for the optimal use of the eastern retail portion of the Westward Ho building, located in downtown Phoenix, adjacent to ASU's downtown campus. This plan

This thesis is a proposal for the optimal use of the eastern retail portion of the Westward Ho building, located in downtown Phoenix, adjacent to ASU's downtown campus. This plan attempts to take into account the interests of the following stakeholders: the building's management, Arizona State University (ASU), ASU students, building residents, and the downtown Phoenix community. Arizona State University and the Westward Ho's current management, the Property Management Group, have entered a partnership with intent of revitalizing select spaces of the Westward Ho. This proposal focuses on the retail space in the southeast portion of the building, and the open space in the southwest area.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

155881-Thumbnail Image.png

The Meaning of Public Space Ownership: A Historical Study of Patriots Park from 1976 to 2007

Description

In the studies of public space redevelopment, property ownership has been a central field that attracts scholars’ attention. However, the term “privatization” is usually used as a stand-in for a

In the studies of public space redevelopment, property ownership has been a central field that attracts scholars’ attention. However, the term “privatization” is usually used as a stand-in for a more general process of exclusion without an examination of the nature of property itself. While taking the universality of law for granted, few studies show how that universality is built out of particular spaces and particular times, and thus hardly explain the existence of counterexamples.

This dissertation argues that the counterexamples and theoretical inconsistencies are a theoretical gap in current public space privatization studies; this gap is created by the metaphorical understanding of public space ownership. This dissertation comprehensively answers how property transfer shapes the production of public space. It emphasizes the significance of social and historical contexts in understanding the meaning of property ownership. It follows the theoretical framework of Lefebvre and Pierson as well as Lefebvre’s methodology of spatial dialectic.

The case in this dissertation is the history of Patriots Park, Phoenix, Arizona from 1976 to 2007. Public records, archives and governmental plans, historical newspapers and online essays, second-hand interviews, speech transcripts and transcripts of interviews are four main sources of this dissertation. This dissertation develops a new framework to understand the meaning of public space ownership through both the initial construction of planning ideology and the spatial evolution through practice and perception, which can more comprehensively and consistently interpret the different outcomes of different public space property transfer.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017