Matching Items (3)

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Ethical Concerns about the Negative Impact of Tourism on Cultural Heritage Sites in Italy

Description

Cultural heritage sites bring people of different backgrounds together to learn about their differences and bond over their shared human history. The tourism industry is an essential tool to access

Cultural heritage sites bring people of different backgrounds together to learn about their differences and bond over their shared human history. The tourism industry is an essential tool to access cultural heritage sites, however tourists themselves pose a threat to the delicate state of ancient ruins and heritage objects. The ways in which tourists interact with cultural heritage sites negatively impacts them, resulting in the premature destruction of cultural heritage, a non-renewable resource. These damaging behaviors may include leaving the guided path, resting on the ruins themselves, touching vulnerable parts of the ruins, and committing acts of vandalism. Tourism must be managed, as the industry works to bring business and revenue into its host community. However, the industry also brings concerns of commercialization to the area, risking the integrity of the site. My research revolves around case studies of Pompeii and the Capuchin Crypt, and their underlying tension with the booming international tourism industry of Italy. Pompeii is not actually the "city frozen in time" by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, but rather an active archaeological site from which a lot can be learned. The Capuchin Crypt is an exquisite expression of beauty in the face of death that features chambers of biblical scenes reenacted with the human remains of Capuchin friars. Each of the sites reflects an aspect of the identity of Italy as a nation and of Italians as individuals, all contributing to a greater global identity. My case studies and research allowed me to find solutions that promote the collaboration between tourism and cultural heritage sites, rather than a state of constant tension.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Attacking Iraq: The New York Times' Coverage of the Looting of Iraqi Antiquities

Description

Armed conflict has often served as a catalyst for the looting of cultural heritage. The lootings of Iraqi antiquities during the Persian Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom serve as

Armed conflict has often served as a catalyst for the looting of cultural heritage. The lootings of Iraqi antiquities during the Persian Gulf War and Operation Iraqi Freedom serve as examples of this horrific consequence. From 1990 to 2014 there have been four major cases of looting in Iraq: the Iraqi regional museums in 1991, archaeological sites throughout the 1990's, the National Museum of Iraq in April 2003, and Iraqi archaeological sites starting in 2003. During this time period, The New York Times reported 84 articles about the status of Iraqi antiquities. Interestingly, the newspaper focused 62 of the articles on the looting of the National Museum of Iraq and subsequent recovery efforts. In this thesis, I will evaluate factors such as subject, article length, word choice, author, paper section, date, accuracy of information, and other relevant influences to determine differences in coverage between the different instances of Iraqi cultural heritage looting. The factors will demonstrate that the marketable qualities of the story, availability of information, and danger of location are some of the factors that led to the disproportional reporting by The New York Times.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Culture in court: the saga of the Persepolis Tablets (a case study)

Description

This thesis explores the implications that the outcome of a certain U.S. lawsuit involving antiquities could have on practices and programs in the United States, related to cultural heritage and

This thesis explores the implications that the outcome of a certain U.S. lawsuit involving antiquities could have on practices and programs in the United States, related to cultural heritage and history. This paper examines the Rubin et al case, which sought to attach a collection of ancient Persian artifacts (known as The Persepolis Tablets) as a source of legal compensation. Presented as a case study, and using primary and secondary research sources, this paper analyzes the Rubin et al lawsuit and the factors that led to its initiation, and seeks to determine how and why adverse consequences could result from its final ruling. This thesis demonstrates that the final decision in the lawsuit could leave a negative impact on a number of practices related to cultural heritage in the United States, especially with regards to cultural and academic institutions such as museums and universities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011