Matching Items (3)

134572-Thumbnail Image.png

Millennial Men vs. Modern American Society: A Male Generation of Angst, Disillusionment, and Love

Description

This thesis tackles the questions of what it means to be a Millennial man, and based upon that way of life, how one would best define Millennial masculinity. This thesis is predominantly a creative project, although it is supported by

This thesis tackles the questions of what it means to be a Millennial man, and based upon that way of life, how one would best define Millennial masculinity. This thesis is predominantly a creative project, although it is supported by a supplemental critical piece that analyzes the themes/topics and poetics behind the poetry. The thesis encompasses a collection of my original poetry relevant to the state of being a Millennial man. This manifestation of Millennial masculinity is observed through the lenses of three distinct themes in my poetry. The first theme is fiscal instability, relating to inheriting a bad economy after the Great Recession of 2008. This economic downturn caused many Millennial men to become too fiscally unstable to live autonomously, pursue their passions (careers they love), or comfortably date the partners they desire. The second theme relates to ambiguous dating and relationship norms that challenge Millennial men's ability and desire to date or commit to a partner. The third theme is in regards to Millennial men being seen by society as either stereotypically macho or overly effeminate. Frequently used poetics in this poetry include repetition and indentation. Both poetic techniques are used to create emphasis in the writing as well as to provide the reader with a deeper comprehension of the poems and their significance to the entire poetry collection. The ultimate goal of both the poetry and the analysis in this creative project is to help people better understand Millennial men, and to help Millennial men better understand and be true to themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

150515-Thumbnail Image.png

Mediators and moderators of the gender role-substance use relationship in Mexican American adolescents

Description

ABSTRACT The relationships between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of gender roles in predicting substance use were examined in a sample of 955 (450 boys, 505 girls) Mexican American 7th and 8th grade adolescents participating in a school-based substance use intervention.

ABSTRACT The relationships between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of gender roles in predicting substance use were examined in a sample of 955 (450 boys, 505 girls) Mexican American 7th and 8th grade adolescents participating in a school-based substance use intervention. The moderating effect of linguistic acculturation, the mediating effects of antisociality, depressive symptoms, and adaptive and avoidant coping on gender role-substance use relationships were examined. Correlational and path analyses supported the Functional Model of Gender Roles that considers these roles as adaptive or maladaptive social coping strategies. For boys, the path analyses yielded significant direct paths from aggressive masculinity to composite alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use measures, with all other effects of gender roles on substance use operating through the mediators. Bootstrapped mediation tests yielded significant indirect paths, where for boys the positive relationships between assertive and aggressive masculinity with substance use and the negative relationship of affective femininity with substance use were mediated through antisociality, which is predictive of increased substance use. For girls, the positive relationship between aggressive masculinity with cigarette and alcohol use and the negative relationship of affective femininity with alcohol and cigarette use were also mediated by adaptive coping, which is predictive of decreased substance use. A different set of significant indirect paths through avoidant coping connected assertive masculinity and submissive femininity to alcohol use for boys. For boys, the paths from affective femininity to antisociality and adaptive coping were found to be moderated by linguistic acculturation, with the negative correlation of affective femininity with antisociality and positive correlation of this gender role with adaptive coping being stronger in boys low in acculturation. In turn, the pathway from this acculturation by affective femininity interaction to substance use was found to be mediated by antisociality. The present analyses confirmed the importance of gender roles and their interaction with acculturation in predicting substance use in Mexican American adolescents. The analyses also were important in delineating functional mechanisms through which these gender roles have their effects, with implications for the design of interventions to reduce substance use in this population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

161262-Thumbnail Image.png

Sexual Identity Self-Labeling, Developmental Statuses, and Traditional Gender Norms Among Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men: Criterion Related Validity Estimates for the Measure of Sexual Identity Exploration and Commitment (MoSIEC)

Description

Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM) may repress gay, bisexual identities due to internalized homophobia and other sociocultural influences. The impact of Latino traditional gender roles, machismo and caballerismo, have not been examined with LMSM who may or

Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM) may repress gay, bisexual identities due to internalized homophobia and other sociocultural influences. The impact of Latino traditional gender roles, machismo and caballerismo, have not been examined with LMSM who may or may not identify as gay or bisexual. The purpose of the present study is to examine relations between self-labeled sexual identity, sexual identity developmental status, and traditional gender norms among Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM). The sample consisted of 499 LMSM, (Mage = 30.79), who endorsed engaging in same-sex sexual behavior. Results suggest evidence of concurrent validity of The Measure of Sexual Identity Exploration and Commitment (MoSIEC) with LMSM. Also, men who identified as heterosexual reported relatively higher levels of machismo and caballerismo. Implications for sexual identity development theory and research with LMSM is provided.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021