Matching Items (26)

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An Approach to Assessing PTSD in Refugee Children

Description

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD. This creative project involved reviewing existing literature on refugees in the United States, child refugees, Erik Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, and available and applicable PTSD assessment tools. I developed a reference chart that compared the available assessment tools. I recognized that a PTSD assessment tool for refugee children does not exist. In response, I created an approach to assessing PTSD in refugee children ages 5-12. In creating this toolkit, I determined who is appropriate for administering the assessment, discovered how to create trust between the clinician and the child, created the assessment tool, including implementation instructions, and then provided directions on scoring and referrals. The tool itself is called the Child Refugee PTSD Assessment Tool (CRPAT-12). The creation of the CRPAT-12 will hopefully be disseminated and will encourage refugee resettlement organizations to assess children for PTSD upon intake. Early identification of symptoms of distress will help the child receive the appropriate treatment and will help prevent more extreme mental health complications.

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Date Created
2017-05

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Sustainability Assessment of a Local Coffee Shop

Description

Derived from the idea that the utilization of sustainable practices could improve small business practice, this honors thesis offers a full business assessment and recommendations for improvements of a local, family-owned coffee shop, Gold Bar. A thorough analysis of the

Derived from the idea that the utilization of sustainable practices could improve small business practice, this honors thesis offers a full business assessment and recommendations for improvements of a local, family-owned coffee shop, Gold Bar. A thorough analysis of the shop's current business practices and research on unnecessary expenses and waste guides this assessment.

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Created

Date Created
2015-05

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A penny and a half and a pool: lead poisoning and its impact on academic achievement

Description

Lead is a neurotoxin that has been shown to have a long and lasting impact on the brains, bodies, and behaviors of those who are poisoned. It also has a greater presence in communities with high levels of poverty

Lead is a neurotoxin that has been shown to have a long and lasting impact on the brains, bodies, and behaviors of those who are poisoned. It also has a greater presence in communities with high levels of poverty and minority populations. Compounded over time, the effects of lead poisoning, even at low levels of exposure, impact a child's readiness and ability to learn. To investigate the relationship between the risk of lead poisoning, school level academic achievement, and community demographics, three sets of data were combined. The Lead Poisoning Risk Index (LPRI), used to quantify the risk in each census tract of being poisoned by lead, standardized state assessment data for third grade reading and eighth grade math, and census 2000 demographic data were combined to provide information for all Arizona schools and census tracts. When achievement was analyzed at the school level using descriptive, bivariate correlation, and multivariate regression analyses, lead's impact practically disappeared, exposing the powerful effect of poverty and race on achievement. At a school in Arizona, the higher the percentage of students who are poor or Hispanic, African American or Native American, these analyses' predictive models suggest there will be a greater percentage of students who fail the third grade AIMS reading and eighth grade AIMS math tests. If better achievement results are to be realized, work must be done to mitigate the effects of poverty on the lives of students. In order to improve schools, there needs to be an accounting for the context within which schools operate and a focus on improving the neighborhoods and the quality of life for the families of students.

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Created

Date Created
2011

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The cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships of early childhood school assessment policies with reading instruction and reading achievement: evidence from early childhood longitudinal study

Description

The purposes of this study were (1) to examine the direct and indirect effect of school-level testing policies on reading achievement though changes in amount and types of reading instruction, (2) to investigate the reading trajectories moderated by school-level testing

The purposes of this study were (1) to examine the direct and indirect effect of school-level testing policies on reading achievement though changes in amount and types of reading instruction, (2) to investigate the reading trajectories moderated by school-level testing policies longitudinally, and (3) to examine the relationship between testing policies and the achievement gap by exploring whether certain student characteristics moderate the relationship between testing policy and reading achievement, using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten (ECLS-K) Cohort of 2010-2011 data. Findings from a multilevel full structural mediation model suggest that school-level frequency of state/local standardized tests had an indirect effect on student reading achievement through changes in both amount and the types of instruction at the school-level (cross-sectional fall kindergarten sample =12,241 children nested in 1,067 kindergarten classes). The findings from a three-level growth models indicated only children of Asian background and children from high socio-economic backgrounds who had frequent standardized tests in kindergarten accelerated in their monthly reading growth, whereas other children (e.g., low SES, non-Asian children) did not show any changes in the rate of the reading growth (longitudinal sample from fall of kindergarten to spring of first grade = 7,392 children nested in 744 kindergartens). The findings from the current study suggest that testing policy is not an effective means to reduce the achievement gap of children from disadvantaged family backgrounds, underperforming children or that children from low socieo-economic backgrounds. These children did not seem to benefit from frequent standardized tests longitudinally. Implications for supporting school assessment practices and instruction are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
2015

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The influence of psychological assessment language on counselor trainees' evaluations of client characteristics

Description

ABSTRACT

Psychological assessments contain important diagnostic information and are central to therapeutic service delivery. Therapists' personal biases, invalid cognitive schemas, and emotional reactions can be expressed in the language of the assessments they compose, causing clients to be cast in

ABSTRACT

Psychological assessments contain important diagnostic information and are central to therapeutic service delivery. Therapists' personal biases, invalid cognitive schemas, and emotional reactions can be expressed in the language of the assessments they compose, causing clients to be cast in an unfavorable light. Logically, the opinions of subsequent therapists may then be influenced by reading these assessments, resulting in negative attitudes toward clients, inaccurate diagnoses, adverse experiences for clients, and poor therapeutic outcomes. However, little current research exists that addresses this issue. This study analyzed the degree to which strength-based, deficit-based, and neutral language used in psychological assessments influenced the opinions of counselor trainees (N= 116). It was hypothesized that participants assigned to each type of assessment would describe the client using adjectives that closely conformed to the language used in the assessment they received. The hypothesis was confirmed (p = .000), indicating significant mean differences between all three groups. Limitations and implications of the study were identified and suggestions for further research were discussed.

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Created

Date Created
2015

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Second language proficiency in sequential bilingual Children with and without primary language impairment

Description

Identification of primary language impairment (PLI) in sequential bilingual children is challenging because of the interaction between PLI and second language (L2) proficiency. An important step in improving the accurate diagnosis of PLI in bilingual children is to investigate how

Identification of primary language impairment (PLI) in sequential bilingual children is challenging because of the interaction between PLI and second language (L2) proficiency. An important step in improving the accurate diagnosis of PLI in bilingual children is to investigate how differences in L2 performance are affected by a length of L2 exposure and how L2 assessment contributes to differentiation between children with and without PLI at different L2 proficiency levels. Sixty one children with typical language development (TD) ages 5;3-8 years and 12 children with PLI ages 5;5-7;8 years participated. Results revealed that bilingual children with and without PLI, who had between 1 and 3 years of L2 exposure, did not differ in mean length of utterance (MLU), number of different words, percent of maze words, and performance on expressive and receptive grammatical tasks in L2. Performance on a grammaticality judgment task by children with and without PLI demonstrated the largest effect size, indicating that it may potentially contribute to identification of PLI in bilingual populations. In addition, children with PLI did not demonstrate any association between the length of exposure and L2 proficiency, suggesting that they do not develop their L2 proficiency in relation to length of exposure in the same manner as children with TD. Results also indicated that comprehension of grammatical structures and expressive grammatical task in L2 may contribute to differentiation between the language ability groups at the low and intermediate-high proficiency levels. The discriminant analysis with the entire sample of bilingual children with and without PLI revealed that among L2 measures, only MLU contributed to the discrimination between the language ability groups. However, poor classification accuracy suggested that MLU alone is not a sufficient predictor of PLI. There were significant differences among L2 proficiency levels in children with TD in MLU, number of different words, and performance on the expressive and receptive grammatical tasks in L2, indicating that L2 proficiency level may potentially impact the differentiation between language difficulties due to typical L2 acquisition processes and PLI.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Knowledge in action: effectively teaching healthy behavior knowledge in physical education classes

Description

An intervention study was conducted with elementary physical education teachers and their use of a newly developed series of fitness segments called Knowledge in Action (KIA). This study was designed to enable teachers to teach healthy behavior knowledge (HBK) in

An intervention study was conducted with elementary physical education teachers and their use of a newly developed series of fitness segments called Knowledge in Action (KIA). This study was designed to enable teachers to teach healthy behavior knowledge (HBK) in their classes without sacrificing physical activity levels. This study has two phases. First, the intervention was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the KIA fitness segment intervention. Second, teachers' perceptions of both teaching HBK and the KIA fitness segments were investigated. Ten teacher participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Intervention teachers participated in professional development, provided with all teaching materials, and YouTube videos that modeled the teaching of the KIA fitness segments. Teacher fidelity was measured through observations. Student physical activity patterns were measured in randomly selected teachers' classes (both intervention and control) to determine potential physical activity pattern differences between groups. Teachers were interviewed from one to three times across the project in order to determine perceptions of teaching HBK and the KIA fitness segments. Researchers used constant comparison method to uncover possible common themes. Student knowledge was assessed pre/post using PE Metrics Standard 3 cognitive test to determine HBK changes. Data analysis included General liner models (GLM) at the student level (gender) and Hierarchical linear models (HLM) at the school level (treatment, school). There was a moderate mean teacher fidelity score (77.9%) found among the intervention teachers. HLM results showed students in the intervention group had a 3.4(20%) greater improvement in HBK scores when compared with their control counterparts (p<0.001). Student activity levels were found to be similar in both groups with 871.33 and 822.22 steps in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Although all of the teachers thought it was important to teach HBK they were not spending time on it during classes at pretest. Three common themes were discovered: (a) Effective Teacher Training of the Segments, (b), Teachers Learned a Novel Strategy, and (c) Teachers Recommended Modifications. In summary, the KIA fitness segments received favorable views and gave teachers a way to teach HBK without reducing physical activity time.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Assessing cognitive learning of analytical problem solving

Description

Introductory programming courses, also known as CS1, have a specific set of expected outcomes related to the learning of the most basic and essential computational concepts in computer science (CS). However, two of the most often heard complaints in such

Introductory programming courses, also known as CS1, have a specific set of expected outcomes related to the learning of the most basic and essential computational concepts in computer science (CS). However, two of the most often heard complaints in such courses are that (1) they are divorced from the reality of application and (2) they make the learning of the basic concepts tedious. The concepts introduced in CS1 courses are highly abstract and not easily comprehensible. In general, the difficulty is intrinsic to the field of computing, often described as "too mathematical or too abstract." This dissertation presents a small-scale mixed method study conducted during the fall 2009 semester of CS1 courses at Arizona State University. This study explored and assessed students' comprehension of three core computational concepts - abstraction, arrays of objects, and inheritance - in both algorithm design and problem solving. Through this investigation students' profiles were categorized based on their scores and based on their mistakes categorized into instances of five computational thinking concepts: abstraction, algorithm, scalability, linguistics, and reasoning. It was shown that even though the notion of computational thinking is not explicit in the curriculum, participants possessed and/or developed this skill through the learning and application of the CS1 core concepts. Furthermore, problem-solving experiences had a direct impact on participants' knowledge skills, explanation skills, and confidence. Implications for teaching CS1 and for future research are also considered.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Experience in data quality assessment on archived historical freeway traffic data

Description

Concern regarding the quality of traffic data exists among engineers and planners tasked with obtaining and using the data for various transportation applications. While data quality issues are often understood by analysts doing the hands on work, rarely are the

Concern regarding the quality of traffic data exists among engineers and planners tasked with obtaining and using the data for various transportation applications. While data quality issues are often understood by analysts doing the hands on work, rarely are the quality characteristics of the data effectively communicated beyond the analyst. This research is an exercise in measuring and reporting data quality. The assessment was conducted to support the performance measurement program at the Maricopa Association of Governments in Phoenix, Arizona, and investigates the traffic data from 228 continuous monitoring freeway sensors in the metropolitan region. Results of the assessment provide an example of describing the quality of the traffic data with each of six data quality measures suggested in the literature, which are accuracy, completeness, validity, timeliness, coverage and accessibility. An important contribution is made in the use of data quality visualization tools. These visualization tools are used in evaluating the validity of the traffic data beyond pass/fail criteria commonly used. More significantly, they serve to educate an intuitive sense or understanding of the underlying characteristics of the data considered valid. Recommendations from the experience gained in this assessment include that data quality visualization tools be developed and used in the processing and quality control of traffic data, and that these visualization tools, along with other information on the quality control effort, be stored as metadata with the processed data.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Longitudinal factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition in a referred sample

Description

Standardized intelligence tests are some of the most widely used tests by psychologists. Of these, clinicians most frequently use the Wechsler scales of intelligence. The most recent version of this test for children is the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children

Standardized intelligence tests are some of the most widely used tests by psychologists. Of these, clinicians most frequently use the Wechsler scales of intelligence. The most recent version of this test for children is the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition (WISC-IV); given the multiple test revisions that have occurred with the WISC, it is essential to address evidence regarding the structural validity of the test; specifically, that the internal structure of the test corresponds with the structure of the theoretical construct being measured. The current study is the first to investigate the factor structure of the WISC-IV across time for the same individuals. Factorial invariance of the WISC-IV was investigated using a group of 352 students eligible for psychoeducational evaluations tested, on average, 2.8 years apart. One research question was addressed: Does the structure of the WISC-IV remain invariant for the same individuals across time? Using structural equation modeling methods for a four-factor oblique model of the WISC-IV, this study found invariance at the configural and weak levels and partial invariance at the strong and strict levels. This indicated that the overall factor structure remained the same at test and retest with equal precision of the factor loadings at both time points. Three subtest intercepts (BD, CD, and SI) were not equivalent across test and retest; additionally, four subtest error variances (BD, CD, SI, and SS) were not equivalent across test and retest. These results indicate that the WISC-IV measures the same constructs equally well across time, and differences in an individual's cognitive profile can be safely interpreted as reflecting change in the underlying construct across time rather than variations in the test itself. This allows clinicians to be more confident in interpretation of changes in the overall cognitive profile of individual's across time. However, this study's results did not indicate that an individual's test scores should be compared across time. Overall, it was concluded that there is partial measurement invariance of the WISC-IV across time, with invariance of all factor loadings, invariance of all but three intercepts, and invariance of all but four item error variances.

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Created

Date Created
2012