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The Value-Added Tax: An Analysis on Prospective Implementation in the United States

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The Value-Added Tax (VAT) is a broad based consumption tax on goods and services. Similar to a Retail Sales Tax, the VAT has the final burden of the tax fall

The Value-Added Tax (VAT) is a broad based consumption tax on goods and services. Similar to a Retail Sales Tax, the VAT has the final burden of the tax fall on the end consumer. However, the tax is collected throughout stages of production, which means the government collects it sooner and the retailer is not the only company remitting tax to the government. As of this writing, the VAT is used in over 150 countries around the world. The United States is the only developed nation that does not have a federal VAT. While there are several plans for VAT implementation in the U.S., one of the more promising is the Competitive Tax Plan by Michael Graetz. In it, Graetz suggests a 10 to 14 percent VAT in order to pay for reduction in corporate income tax and an increase of the individual tax filing thresholds to $50,000 for single taxpayers and $100,000 for married taxpayers. As the nation goes further into debt, it is important that the United States looks for alternative sources of revenue. A VAT could prove to be the best option, as it is a proven solution used by many other nations.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Transfer Pricing for Intangibles: Tax Benefits and Risks

Description

The price charged between related parties for the transfer of goods, services, or intangibles, is known as a transfer price. A taxpayer is required to set its transfer price at

The price charged between related parties for the transfer of goods, services, or intangibles, is known as a transfer price. A taxpayer is required to set its transfer price at arm's-length, similar to what would be charged to an unrelated party, to prevent a taxpayer from greatly reducing its global tax by shifting profits from its U.S. entity to an entity located in a jurisdiction with a lower tax rate. Section 482 of the Internal Revenue Code and its associated regulations advises taxpayers on the various methods to calculate its transfer price. These include: the Comparable Uncontrolled Transaction (CUT) method, the Comparable Profits Method (CPM), and the Profit Split Method. Section 482 also grants the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) the authority to allocate a corporation's transfer price if it is not at arm's-length. With millions and sometimes billions of dollars at stake, it is important for the IRS to resolve the incredibly complex issue of transfer pricing without placing an unnecessary burden on U.S. corporations.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12