Matching Items (5)

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Electrode Surface Area Roughness Effect on Power Output of Thermogalvanic Cells

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This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of altering electrode surface area roughness on thermogalvanic cell performance. A temperature difference between two electrodes was induced and brought to

This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of altering electrode surface area roughness on thermogalvanic cell performance. A temperature difference between two electrodes was induced and brought to steady state to achieve a difference of around 50 °C, which was maintained with a DC power generated hot wire and a pumped ice bath. The open-circuit voltage values at steady-state were measured by a programed multimeter and the temperatures were measured by a series of type K thermocouples. Electrode surface area roughness was altered using different grit values of sandpaper and measuring the values using a Zescope Optical Profilometer. Once three different surface area average values were achieved, 6 trials were performed with 2 trials per roughness value. The results were tabulated in Section 4 of this report.
It was predicted that increasing the surface area roughness would increase the number of electrons present in the reduction oxidation reaction and decrease the activation resistance of the thermogalvanic system. Decreasing the activation resistance, a component of total internal resistance, would therefore increase the power output of the cell by a small magnitude. The results showed that changing the surface area roughness of the Copper electrodes evidently had no effect on the outputs of the cell system. Additionally, the Seebeck coefficient was also unaffected by the presence of increased surface area roughness.
The work presented in the following paper is part of a continuing effort to better understand the performance of thermogalvanic cells and their heat to electrical energy transfer properties.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Design and Optimization of a Building Integrated Solar Thermoelectric Generator

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The main objective of this project was to continue research and development of a building integrated solar thermoelectric generator (BISTEG). BISTEG is a promising renewable energy technology that is capable

The main objective of this project was to continue research and development of a building integrated solar thermoelectric generator (BISTEG). BISTEG is a promising renewable energy technology that is capable of generating electrical energy from the heat of concentrated sunlight. In order to perform R&D, the performance of different TEG cells and TEG setups were tested and analyzed, proof-of-concepts and prototypes were built. and the performance of the proof-of-concepts and prototypes were tested and analyzed as well. In order to test different TEG cells and TEG setups, a TEG testing apparatus was designed and fabricated. The apparatus is capable of comparing the performance of TEGs with temperature differentials up to 200 degrees C. Along with a TEG testing apparatus, several proof-of-concepts and prototypes were completed. All of these were tested in order to determine the feasibility of the design. All three proof-of-concepts were only capable of producing a voltage output less than 300mV. The prototype, however, was capable of producing a max output voltage of 17 volts. Although the prototype outperformed all of the proof-of-concepts, optimizations to the design can continue to improve the output voltage. In order to do so, stacked TEG tests were performed. After performing the stacked TEG tests, it was determined that the use of stacked TEGs depended on the Fresnel lens chosen. If BISTEG were to use a point focused Fresnel lens, using a stack of TEGs could increase the power density. If BISTEG were to utilize a linear focused Fresnel lens, however, the TEGs should not be stacked. It would be more efficient to lay them out side by side. They can be stacked, however, if the energy density needs to be increased and the costs of the additional TEGs are not an issue.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Development of a Measurement System for Thin Film Electrical Properties

Description

With the world's ever growing need for sustainable energy solutions, the field of thermoelectrics has seen rejuvenated interest. Specifically, modern advances in nanoscale technology have resulted in predictions that thermoelectric

With the world's ever growing need for sustainable energy solutions, the field of thermoelectrics has seen rejuvenated interest. Specifically, modern advances in nanoscale technology have resulted in predictions that thermoelectric devices will soon become a viable waste heat recovery energy source, among other things. In order to achieve these predictions, however, key structure-property relationships must first be understood. Currently, the Thermal Energy and Nanomaterials Lab at Arizona State University is attempting to solve this problem. This project intends to aid the groups big picture goal by developing a robust and user friendly measurement platform which is capable of reporting charge carrier mobility, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient values. To date, the charge carrier mobility and electrical conductivity measurements have been successfully implemented and validated. First round analysis has been performed on β-In2Se3 thin film samples. Future work will feature a more comprehensive analysis of this material.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Characterization of Solution-processed Metal Chalcogenide Precursor, Thin Film, and Nanocomposite for Thermoelectricity

Description

Satisfying the ever-increasing demand for electricity while maintaining sustainability and eco-friendliness has become a key challenge for humanity. Around 70% of energy is rejected as heat from different sectors. Thermoelectric

Satisfying the ever-increasing demand for electricity while maintaining sustainability and eco-friendliness has become a key challenge for humanity. Around 70% of energy is rejected as heat from different sectors. Thermoelectric energy harvesting has immense potential to convert this heat into electricity in an environmentally friendly manner. However, low efficiency and high manufacturing costs inhibit the widespread application of thermoelectric devices. In this work, an inexpensive solution processing technique and a nanostructuring approach are utilized to create thermoelectric materials. Specifically, the solution-state and solid-state structure of a lead selenide (PbSe) precursor is characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. This precursor has shown promise for preparing thermoelectric lead selenide telluride (PbSexTe1-x) thin films. The precursor was prepared by reacting lead and diphenyl diselenide in different solvents. The characterization reveals the formation of a solvated lead(II) phenylselenolate complex which deepens the understanding of the formation of these precursors. Further, using slightly different chemistry, a low-temperature tin(II) selenide (SnSe) precursor was synthesized and identified as tin(IV) methylselenolate. The low transformation temperature makes it compatible with colloidal PbSe nanocrystals. The colloidal PbSe nanocrystals were chemically treated with a SnSe precursor and subjected to mild annealing to form conductive nanocomposites. Finally, the room temperature thermoelectric characterization of solution-processed PbSexTe1-x thin films is presented. This is followed by a setup development for temperature-dependent measurements and preliminary temperature-dependent measurements on PbSexTe1-x thin films.

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Date Created
  • 2020

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Synthesis, structures and properties of thermoelectric materials in the Zn-Sb-In system

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The challenging search for clean, reliable and environmentally friendly energy sources has fueled increased research in thermoelectric materials, which are capable of recovering waste heat. Among the state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials

The challenging search for clean, reliable and environmentally friendly energy sources has fueled increased research in thermoelectric materials, which are capable of recovering waste heat. Among the state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials β-Zn4Sb3 is outstanding because of its ultra-low glass-like thermal conductivity. Attempts to explore ternary phases in the Zn-Sb-In system resulted in the discovery of the new intermetallic compounds, stable Zn5Sb4In2-δ (δ=0.15) and metastable Zn9Sb6In2. Millimeter-sized crystals were grown from molten metal fluxes, where indium metal was employed as a reactive flux medium.Zn5Sb4In2-δ and Zn9Sb6In2 crystallize in new structure types featuring complex framework and the presence of structural disorder (defects and split atomic positions). The structure and phase relations between ternary Zn5Sb4In2-δ, Zn9Sb6In2 and binary Zn4Sb3 are discussed. To establish and understand structure-property relationships, thermoelectric properties measurements were carried out. The measurements suggested that Zn5Sb4In2-δ and Zn9Sb6In2 are narrow band gap semiconductors, similar to β-Zn4Sb3. Also, the peculiar low thermal conductivity of Zn4Sb3 (1 W/mK) is preserved. In the investigated temperature range 10 to 350 K Zn5Sb4In2-δ displays higher thermoelectric figure of merits than Zn4Sb3, indicating a potential significance in thermoelectric applications. Finally, the glass-like thermal conductivities of binary and ternary antimonides with complex structures are compared and the mechanism behind their low thermal conductivities is briefly discussed.

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Date Created
  • 2011