Matching Items (5)

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A Strategic Analysis on the Effectiveness of Russian Information Warfare

Description

Though information warfare has been around for centuries, the advent of the Information Age has made this type of warfare increasingly utilized by both state and non-state actors to varying

Though information warfare has been around for centuries, the advent of the Information Age has made this type of warfare increasingly utilized by both state and non-state actors to varying effects in conflicts across the world. Technological advances have ignited increases in computing power, information computerization, the proliferation of powerful information technology, and communication speeds. This study investigates Russian information warfare doctrine- specifically, the tactics employed in information warfare campaigns and the effects of such campaigns. The Russian hybrid warfare campaigns in Ukraine and Syria will serve as the focal case studies. I argue that Russian information warfare doctrine is inelastic, in that the core tactics used do not change in different conflicts. This study will dissect Russian information warfare principles, provide an overview of the Russian political objectives in both battlespaces, analyze the effectiveness of information warfare tactics when applied in two different engagement spheres, and will explore the reasons why the same tactics had different effects. The study finds that doctrinally identical information warfare tactics were used in both Ukraine and Syria. To provide further significance, the study discusses the policy implications that static Russian information warfare doctrine has regarding the future of information warfare in conflict.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The USA PATRIOT Act: Do these Laws Infringe on the Corporate Civil Liberties of the Telecommunication Industry?

Description

Does the USA PATRIOT Act place unconstitutional pressure on the telecommunications industry to comply with federal surveillance requests for information at the determent of their domestic and international operations? Is

Does the USA PATRIOT Act place unconstitutional pressure on the telecommunications industry to comply with federal surveillance requests for information at the determent of their domestic and international operations? Is the Act in direct violation of the Fourth Amendment protection against unlawful search and seizures due to its vague language and lack of judicial oversight or adequate safeguards? In this thesis I will analyze whether, the USA PATRIOT Act infringes on a corporation's civil liberties through both historical references of both its legislative structure and design as well as current issues at the center of Congressional controversy. The forced cooperation demanded of the telecoms by the government subjects these businesses to possible consumer distrust, financial burdens, and inability to ensure confidentiality of communications for their multinational clients. The U.S. based telecommunications firms will continue to grow in the global marketplace; however, their competitive advantage will be limited by the excessive misuse of Federal powers to access United States' consumer information through third-party enterprises. Therefore, the provisions relating to the government's unchecked access to telecommunication data are unconstitutional because they do not serve a legitimate government interest in the least restrictive manner possible. They should be revised to balance both national security concerns and a telecom's right to protect its corporate infrastructure and brand.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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The Snowden Effect: Examining the Legal, Policy, and Political Implications of the Revelations about the NSA Bulk Collection Metadata Program

Description

Edward Snowden's publishing classified information about the existence of the Section 215 bulk collection metadata program set in motion the largest debate about potential abuse in by spying agencies since

Edward Snowden's publishing classified information about the existence of the Section 215 bulk collection metadata program set in motion the largest debate about potential abuse in by spying agencies since the Watergate Scandal in the 1970's. This paper will examine the metadata program by: First, the relevant background which includes the establishment of the 20th century intelligence community, intelligence reforms in the wake of the Watergate scandal, and the changes stemming from the 9/11 attacks. Second, the Section 215 metadata program itself will be discussed, including its lawfulness. Third and finally, an analysis of potential reforms will be discussed, including ones advanced by government commissions. Ultimately, the Section 215 program has demonstrated compelling legal authority, positive benefits to national security, and a minimal need for reform. This conclusion is based on the program being consistent with the legal spirit of the Watergate Reforms, the language of the post-9/11 laws, the nature of the program, and the robust oversight protocols imposed upon the program.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The rhetoric of surveillance in post-Snowden background investigation policy reform

Description

In June 2013, United States (US) government contractor Edward Snowden arranged for journalists at The Guardian to release classified information detailing US government surveillance programs. While this release caused the

In June 2013, United States (US) government contractor Edward Snowden arranged for journalists at The Guardian to release classified information detailing US government surveillance programs. While this release caused the public to decry the scope and privacy concerns of these surveillance systems, Snowden's actions also caused the US Congress to critique how Snowden got a security clearance allowing him access to sensitive information in the first place. Using Snowden's actions as a kairotic moment, this study examined congressional policy documents through a qualitative content analysis to identify what Congress suggested could “fix” in the background investigation (BI) process. The study then looked at the same documents to problematize these “solutions” through the terministic screen of surveillance studies.

By doing this interdisciplinary rhetorical analysis, the study showed that while Congress encouraged more oversight, standardization, and monitoring for selected steps of the BI process, these suggestions are not neutral solutions without larger implications; they are value-laden choices which have consequences for matters of both national security and social justice. Further, this study illustrates the value of incorporating surveillance as framework in rhetoric, composition, and professional/technical communication research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Border crossings: smuggling operations in the Southwest

Description

Following the implementation of federal immigration control measures in the 1990s, Arizona became the main point of entry for undocumented immigrants along the US border with Mexico in the early

Following the implementation of federal immigration control measures in the 1990s, Arizona became the main point of entry for undocumented immigrants along the US border with Mexico in the early 2000s. Since then, reports have blamed human smuggling facilitators for the increase of undocumented immigration into the state and the apparent development of violent practices targeting the undocumented. However, little is known about the organization of the groups who work at facilitating the transit of undocumented immigrants along the US Mexico Border. Based on interviews and narratives present in legal files of smuggling cases prosecuted in Phoenix, Arizona, the present study provides an analysis of local human smuggling operations. It argues that far from being under the control of organized crime, smuggling is an income generating strategy of the poor that generates financial opportunities for community members in financial distress. The study, raises questions over smuggling's perceptions as violent and instead identifies smuggling-related violence as a reflection of the structural violence carried out by the state against immigrant communities through policing, surveillance and the consistent and systematic exercise of race-based policies.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011