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Development of a Clinically Relevant Brochure About the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative

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The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was created in 1991 with the goal to provide support and education to mothers on breastfeeding in order to increase the rate and duration of breastfeeding across the world. Despite being around for over

The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was created in 1991 with the goal to provide support and education to mothers on breastfeeding in order to increase the rate and duration of breastfeeding across the world. Despite being around for over 20 years, it has only been successfully incorporated into 245 hospitals in the United States as of 2015. Due to the many benefits this initiative brings to mothers, infants, and the hospitals themselves as well as being shown to increase the incidence, duration, and exclusivity of breastfeeding, the goal of this project was to create a mother friendly brochure sharing this. The brochure was created in order to spread the word of the BFHI to expecting mothers so that they are informed and able to use this information to not only improve their own child-birthing experience but also push for implementation in their delivering facilities. The brochure covers additional topics such as breastfeeding benefits and tips, lactation resources, and steps to incorporate into their own hospital stay if outside of a BFHI facility in order to get a few of the benefits that the Baby Friendly Initiative provides. The brochure was tested for clarity, effectiveness, and for overall reactions in a study conducted at a local women's clinic surveying expectant mothers through the use of a short survey. These results were used to make minor improvements to the brochure before moving on to plans of how to disseminate the brochure to more clinics within the Phoenix area. The dissemination of this brochure will share this important information with women of childbearing age and hopefully lead to greater knowledge and progress towards improved maternal and neonatal outcomes.

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2015-05

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Reliability of the Preterm Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS) for the Late Preterm Infant Population

Description

Late preterm infants (LPIs), born between 34 and 37 weeks gestation, are at risk for a myriad of health conditions related to neuro-muscular and physiologic immaturity. However, relative stability allow many of these infants to avoid care in specialty nurseries

Late preterm infants (LPIs), born between 34 and 37 weeks gestation, are at risk for a myriad of health conditions related to neuro-muscular and physiologic immaturity. However, relative stability allow many of these infants to avoid care in specialty nurseries and discharge home with their mothers after birth. Due to underlying immaturity, feeding difficulty is the most common issue LPIs experience, resulting in early breastfeeding cessation, increased risk for secondary diagnoses, and hospital readmission. The purpose of this study was to assess early breastfeeding behavior of LPIs, including testing inter-rater reliability of an assessment tool and the feeding patterns of infants over time. An extensive review of breastfeeding assessment tools resulted in the selection of the Premature Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS) based on its reliability and validity in the preterm infant population. A convenience sample of LPI dyads was recruited and used to conduct inter-rater reliability testing of PIBBS. A longitudinal one-group non-experimental study was used for observational follow-up. A strong statistical agreement of PIBBS scores occurred between mothers and a healthcare professional (Cohen’s kappa values of items ranged from .776 to 1.000, p = <.001). Participants continued using the PIBBS tool after hospital discharge until their infants expected due dates (40 weeks adjusted age). T-test analyses were conducted to examine changes in scores over time indicating increase in item scores (p = .003 - .193). PIBBS appears to be a valid and reliable tool to assess breastfeeding among LPI dyads. Incorporation of PIBBS into a comprehensive plan of care could better support and protect breastfeeding among the LPI population.

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2018