Matching Items (6)

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The Effect of Tongue-Tie Revisions on Breastfeeding Outcomes

Description

A short and thickened lingual frenulum characterizes tongue-ties. Infants with this condition are likely to have issues with their latch, weight gain, and the ability to breastfeed exclusively. Mothers typically

A short and thickened lingual frenulum characterizes tongue-ties. Infants with this condition are likely to have issues with their latch, weight gain, and the ability to breastfeed exclusively. Mothers typically struggle with nipple pain and trauma. Tongue-tie procedures have become increasingly more popular as families turn to this intervention when struggling with breastfeeding.

The purpose of this quality improvement project is to collect data on tongue-tie revision procedures to explore the benefits, risks, and patient satisfaction with the clinical process. Questionnaires were created to collect information on tongue-tie revisions. Participants were asked to identify symptoms related both to the mother and infant. The type of feeding was assessed before and after to identify if the tongue-tie revisions increased exclusive breastfeeding. Likert-type scales were used to address maternal nipple pain, overall improvements in breastfeeding, and patient experience.

A total of 36 participants completed the pre-op questionnaire, and 22 completed the post-op questionnaires over four months. The results found that this was a low-risk procedure that helped improve breastfeeding or maternal and infant symptoms. There should be continued efforts to find ways to continue to collect this data, as it will increase the awareness of tongue-tie’s effect on breastfeeding.

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Date Created
  • 2021-04-01

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Proof of Concept of Pseudo-Continuous Monitoring of L-Lactate Levels Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

Description

As of today, there does not exist a cheap diagnostic for lactate for use in trauma centers. $671 billion are spent on trauma accidents and emergency rooms, with money focused

As of today, there does not exist a cheap diagnostic for lactate for use in trauma centers. $671 billion are spent on trauma accidents and emergency rooms, with money focused on treatments such as YSI and ELISA, costing $1500 and $200, respectively. Gold disk electrodes were used to immobilize lactate dehydrogenase and glucose oxidase, with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) used as the method for detection. Two lactate experimental runs were completed with data detailing a linear model and positive correlation for imaginary impedance and concentration, and one glucose experimental run was completed proving that a continuous system can be completed accounting for reaction and consumption using EIS, a process previously not done before.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Development of a Clinically Relevant Brochure About the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative

Description

The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was created in 1991 with the goal to provide support and education to mothers on breastfeeding in order to increase the rate and duration

The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was created in 1991 with the goal to provide support and education to mothers on breastfeeding in order to increase the rate and duration of breastfeeding across the world. Despite being around for over 20 years, it has only been successfully incorporated into 245 hospitals in the United States as of 2015. Due to the many benefits this initiative brings to mothers, infants, and the hospitals themselves as well as being shown to increase the incidence, duration, and exclusivity of breastfeeding, the goal of this project was to create a mother friendly brochure sharing this. The brochure was created in order to spread the word of the BFHI to expecting mothers so that they are informed and able to use this information to not only improve their own child-birthing experience but also push for implementation in their delivering facilities. The brochure covers additional topics such as breastfeeding benefits and tips, lactation resources, and steps to incorporate into their own hospital stay if outside of a BFHI facility in order to get a few of the benefits that the Baby Friendly Initiative provides. The brochure was tested for clarity, effectiveness, and for overall reactions in a study conducted at a local women's clinic surveying expectant mothers through the use of a short survey. These results were used to make minor improvements to the brochure before moving on to plans of how to disseminate the brochure to more clinics within the Phoenix area. The dissemination of this brochure will share this important information with women of childbearing age and hopefully lead to greater knowledge and progress towards improved maternal and neonatal outcomes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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An exploration of changes in healthcare providers' learning outcomes related to breastfeeding support and promotion

Description

Despite the widely recognized health benefits of breastfeeding and its endorsement by leading health organizations, as a preventative public health intervention, inadequate breastfeeding knowledge and lactation management skills among healthcare

Despite the widely recognized health benefits of breastfeeding and its endorsement by leading health organizations, as a preventative public health intervention, inadequate breastfeeding knowledge and lactation management skills among healthcare providers continues to be a major barrier for women who choose to initiate breastfeeding. Breastfeeding competencies are not standardized in healthcare education for any of the health professions. To address this gap, a few continuing education and professional development programs have been implemented, but paucity in research regarding the efficacy of these programs exists. The purpose of this study was to explore the changes in healthcare providers’ learning outcomes related to breastfeeding support and promotion.

A non-experimental pre-posttest self-report survey design was used to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an online breastfeeding educational intervention for healthcare providers. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) provided the framework for exploring the participants’ psychological and behavioral outcomes. The research questions were: (1) What is the feasibility of an online breastfeeding course for healthcare providers? (2) What are healthcare providers’ psychological and behavioral changes occurring after completion of an online course? (3) How do the post-intervention psychological and behavioral outcomes of the online format compare with those of the previous format (hybrid) of this breastfeeding course?

Although participants’ favorably assessed the feasibility (i.e., acceptability) of the 45-hour course, several factors contributed to participants’ satisfaction level: Previous online learning experience, connectedness with others, and the degree of structural support. Significant positive changes occurring in participants were increases in their knowledge and beliefs about breastfeeding; attitudes toward formula feeding; perceived behavioral control; perceptions about being able to perform breastfeeding supportive behaviors; and intentions to perform actions that are consistent with evidence-based breastfeeding supportive behaviors. Significant changes in the beliefs about formula feeding were not in the expected direction raising conceptual and pedagogical issues. Participants had negative perceptions about being able to implement what they learned in their workplaces or to affect policy. Findings support the use of online breastfeeding education programs for healthcare providers; changes at both individual and institutional levels are necessary to change provider practices.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Risk abatement practices of recipient participants in private arrangement milk sharing in the United States

Description

Exclusivity and duration of breastfeeding and the provision of human milk in the United States is suboptimal. In the absence of adequate banked donor human milk for distribution to all

Exclusivity and duration of breastfeeding and the provision of human milk in the United States is suboptimal. In the absence of adequate banked donor human milk for distribution to all infants in need, many families choose to engage in the practice of Private Arrangement Milk Sharing (PAMS), partially facilitated through social media, to procure human milk for their infants. Evidence regarding the participant and infant characteristics and risk abatement practices is incomplete. This dissertation describes and explores the characteristics of recipient participants and infants, family constellation, donor screening practices, and related risk abatement strategies. Data was collected via on-line survey as a sub-group of a larger data set including donor participants and international participants. Binary logistic regression modeling of factors that contribute to consistent screening and risk abatement practices and important antecedents to engaging in PAMS was conducted. Results are contextualized within a tailored socioecological framework of factors affecting infant feeding practices. Tailoring was accomplished via qualitative descriptive analysis of participant responses applied to an existing breastfeeding framework. Participants in this sample were predominantly white, married, with a mean age of 32.9 years, with at least some college education and above median income. Risk abatement and screening practices were influenced by support of a healthcare provider during decision-making, college education, infant age and health status, having lactation support, birth type and birth attendant, and the duration and sources sought for learning about milk sharing.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Reliability of the Preterm Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS) for the Late Preterm Infant Population

Description

Late preterm infants (LPIs), born between 34 and 37 weeks gestation, are at risk for a myriad of health conditions related to neuro-muscular and physiologic immaturity. However, relative stability allow

Late preterm infants (LPIs), born between 34 and 37 weeks gestation, are at risk for a myriad of health conditions related to neuro-muscular and physiologic immaturity. However, relative stability allow many of these infants to avoid care in specialty nurseries and discharge home with their mothers after birth. Due to underlying immaturity, feeding difficulty is the most common issue LPIs experience, resulting in early breastfeeding cessation, increased risk for secondary diagnoses, and hospital readmission. The purpose of this study was to assess early breastfeeding behavior of LPIs, including testing inter-rater reliability of an assessment tool and the feeding patterns of infants over time. An extensive review of breastfeeding assessment tools resulted in the selection of the Premature Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS) based on its reliability and validity in the preterm infant population. A convenience sample of LPI dyads was recruited and used to conduct inter-rater reliability testing of PIBBS. A longitudinal one-group non-experimental study was used for observational follow-up. A strong statistical agreement of PIBBS scores occurred between mothers and a healthcare professional (Cohen’s kappa values of items ranged from .776 to 1.000, p = <.001). Participants continued using the PIBBS tool after hospital discharge until their infants expected due dates (40 weeks adjusted age). T-test analyses were conducted to examine changes in scores over time indicating increase in item scores (p = .003 - .193). PIBBS appears to be a valid and reliable tool to assess breastfeeding among LPI dyads. Incorporation of PIBBS into a comprehensive plan of care could better support and protect breastfeeding among the LPI population.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018