Matching Items (4)

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Portable and Low-Cost Detection Platform for Hepatitis B Virus Infections

Description

Approximately 248 million people in the world are currently living with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HBV and HCV infections are the primary cause of liver diseases such as

Approximately 248 million people in the world are currently living with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HBV and HCV infections are the primary cause of liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinomas in the world with an estimated 1.4 million deaths annually. HBV in the Republic of Peru was used as a case study of an emerging and rapidly spreading disease in a developing nation. Wherein, clinical diagnosis of HBV infections in at-risk communities such the Amazon Region and the Andes Mountains are challenging due to a myriad of reasons. High prices of clinical diagnosis and limited access to treatment are alone the most significant deterrent for individuals living in at-risk communities to get the much need help. Additionally, limited testing facilities, lack of adequate testing policies or national guidelines, poor laboratory capacity, resource-limited settings, geographical isolation, and public mistrust are among the chief reasons for low HBV testing. Although, preventative vaccination programs deployed by the Peruvian health officials have reduced the number of infected individuals by year and region. To significantly reduce or eradicate HBV in hyperendemic areas and countries such as Peru, preventative clinical diagnosis and vaccination programs are an absolute necessity. Consequently, the need for a portable low-priced diagnostic platform for the detection of HBV and other diseases is substantial and urgent not only in Peru but worldwide. Some of these concerns were addressed by designing a low-cost, rapid detection platform. In that, an immunosignature technology (IMST) slide used to test for reactivity against the presence of antibodies in the serum-sample was used to test for picture resolution and clarity. IMST slides were scanned using a smartphone camera placed on top of the designed device housing a circuit of 32 LED lights at 647 nm, an optical magnifier at 15X, and a linear polarizing film sheet. Tow 9V batteries powered the scanning device LED circuit ensuring enough lighting. The resulting pictures from the first prototype showed that by lighting the device at 647 nm and using a smartphone camera, the camera could capture high-resolution images. These results conclusively indicate that with any modern smartphone camera, a small box lighted to 647 nm, and optical magnifier; a powerful and expensive laboratory scanning machine can be replaced by another that is inexpensive, portable and ready to use anywhere.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Characterization and analysis of a novel platform for profiling the antibody response

Description

Immunosignaturing is a new immunodiagnostic technology that uses random-sequence peptide microarrays to profile the humoral immune response. Though the peptides have little sequence homology to any known protein, binding of

Immunosignaturing is a new immunodiagnostic technology that uses random-sequence peptide microarrays to profile the humoral immune response. Though the peptides have little sequence homology to any known protein, binding of serum antibodies may be detected, and the pattern correlated to disease states. The aim of my dissertation is to analyze the factors affecting the binding patterns using monoclonal antibodies and determine how much information may be extracted from the sequences. Specifically, I examined the effects of antibody concentration, competition, peptide density, and antibody valence. Peptide binding could be detected at the low concentrations relevant to immunosignaturing, and a monoclonal's signature could even be detected in the presences of 100 fold excess naive IgG. I also found that peptide density was important, but this effect was not due to bivalent binding. Next, I examined in more detail how a polyreactive antibody binds to the random sequence peptides compared to protein sequence derived peptides, and found that it bound to many peptides from both sets, but with low apparent affinity. An in depth look at how the peptide physicochemical properties and sequence complexity revealed that there were some correlations with properties, but they were generally small and varied greatly between antibodies. However, on a limited diversity but larger peptide library, I found that sequence complexity was important for antibody binding. The redundancy on that library did enable the identification of specific sub-sequences recognized by an antibody. The current immunosignaturing platform has little repetition of sub-sequences, so I evaluated several methods to infer antibody epitopes. I found two methods that had modest prediction accuracy, and I developed a software application called GuiTope to facilitate the epitope prediction analysis. None of the methods had sufficient accuracy to identify an unknown antigen from a database. In conclusion, the characteristics of the immunosignaturing platform observed through monoclonal antibody experiments demonstrate its promise as a new diagnostic technology. However, a major limitation is the difficulty in connecting the signature back to the original antigen, though larger peptide libraries could facilitate these predictions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Antibody based strategies for multiplexed diagnostics

Description

Peptide microarrays are to proteomics as sequencing is to genomics. As microarrays become more content-rich, higher resolution proteomic studies will parallel deep sequencing of nucleic acids. Antigen-antibody interactions can be

Peptide microarrays are to proteomics as sequencing is to genomics. As microarrays become more content-rich, higher resolution proteomic studies will parallel deep sequencing of nucleic acids. Antigen-antibody interactions can be studied at a much higher resolution using microarrays than was possible only a decade ago. My dissertation focuses on testing the feasibility of using either the Immunosignature platform, based on non-natural peptide sequences, or a pathogen peptide microarray, which uses bioinformatically-selected peptides from pathogens for creating sensitive diagnostics. Both diagnostic applications use relatively little serum from infected individuals, but each approaches diagnosis of disease differently. The first project compares pathogen epitope peptide (life-space) and non-natural (random-space) peptide microarrays while using them for the early detection of Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever). The second project uses NIAID category A, B and C priority pathogen epitope peptides in a multiplexed microarray platform to assess the feasibility of using epitope peptides to simultaneously diagnose multiple exposures using a single assay. Cross-reactivity is a consistent feature of several antigen-antibody based immunodiagnostics. This work utilizes microarray optimization and bioinformatic approaches to distill the underlying disease specific antibody signature pattern. Circumventing inherent cross-reactivity observed in antibody binding to peptides was crucial to achieve the goal of this work to accurately distinguishing multiple exposures simultaneously.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Diagnostic utility of WISC-IV General Abilities Index and Cognitive Proficiency Index difference scores among children with ADHD

Description

The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) General Abilities Index (GAI) and Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) have been advanced as possible diagnostic markers of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) General Abilities Index (GAI) and Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) have been advanced as possible diagnostic markers of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Diagnostic utility statistics were used to test the ability of GAI-CPI difference scores to identify children with ADHD. Participants included an ADHD sample (n = 78), a referred but non-diagnosed hospital sample (n = 66), and a simulated sample with virtually identical psychometric characteristics as the WISC-IV 2,200 child standardization sample. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were computed to determine the utility of GAI-CPI difference scores to identify children with ADHD. The GAI-CPI discrepancy method had an AUC of .64, 95% CI [0.58, 0.71] for the ADHD sample compared to the simulated normative sample and an AUC of .46, 95% CI [0.37, 0.56] for the ADHD sample compared to the referred but non-diagnosed hospital sample. These AUC scores indicate that the GAI-CPI discrepancy method has low accuracy.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010