Matching Items (3)

133946-Thumbnail Image.png

How Low Conditional vs. High Conditional Rewards Influence Consumer-Brand Connection

Description

While developing and maintaining a connection between a brand and a customer has always been in the forefront of marketers' agendas, it has become an even more pressing goal as

While developing and maintaining a connection between a brand and a customer has always been in the forefront of marketers' agendas, it has become an even more pressing goal as digital trends in marketing surface. Although the idea of using rewards to foster consumer-brand connection has been around for decades, marketers are still struggling to optimize the benefits. How can marketers use rewards to better connect with their customers? Are there certain types of rewards that are more effective than others? Are certain rewards more effective when being implemented under brands of a certain personality type? In a society that values connection and relationship, marketers cannot lose their ability to appreciate customers under digital constraints and to marketplace competition. Through a field study and scenario-based experiment, we explore how and why low conditional vs. high conditional rewards influence consumer-brand connection and the role brand personality plays.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

136736-Thumbnail Image.png

An Adaptive Physical Activity Intervention for Inactive Adolescents: A Single Case Design

Description

An increasingly sedentary population in the United States, specifically with adolescents, is putting youth at risk of future health related trauma and disease. This single-case design study, Walking Intervention Through

An increasingly sedentary population in the United States, specifically with adolescents, is putting youth at risk of future health related trauma and disease. This single-case design study, Walking Intervention Through Text Messaging for Adolescents (WalkIT-A), was used to intervene with a 12-year old, physically inactive male, in an attempt to test the efficacy of a 12-week physical activity program that may help reduce health risks by increasing number of steps walked per day. The components of the intervention consisted of a FitBit Zip pedometer, physical activity education, text messages, monetary incentives, and goal setting that adapted personally to the participant. Mean step count increased by 30% from baseline (mean = 3603 [sd = 1983]) to intervention (mean = 4693 [sd = 2112]); then increased slightly by 6.7% from intervention to withdrawal (mean = 5009 [sd = 2152]). Mean "very active minutes" increased by 45% from baseline (mean = 8.8 [sd = 8.9]) to intervention (mean = 12.8 [sd = 9.6]); then increased by 61.7% from intervention to withdrawal (mean = 20.7 [sd = 8.4]). Weight, BMI, and blood pressure all increased modestly from pre to post. Cardiovascular fitness (estimated VO2 max) improved by 12.5% from pre (25.5ml*kg-1*min-1) to post (28.7ml*kg-1*min-1). The intervention appeared to have a delayed and residual effect on the participant's daily steps and very active minutes. Although the idealistic ABA pattern did not occur, and the participant did not meet the target of 11,500 daily steps, a positive trend toward that target behavior in the latter 1/3rd of the intervention was observed. Results suggest the need for an extended intervention over a longer period of time and customized even further to the participant.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

147774-Thumbnail Image.png

Green Gamers

Description

Obesity rates among adults have steadily grown in recent decades all the way up to 42.4% in 2018. This is a 12% increase from the turn of the century

Obesity rates among adults have steadily grown in recent decades all the way up to 42.4% in 2018. This is a 12% increase from the turn of the century (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2021). A major reason for this rise is increased consumption of processed, high-calorie foods. People eat these foods at a young age and develop bad eating habits that can last for the rest of their lives. It is essential to intervene early and help adolescents form balanced, healthy eating habits before bad habits are already formed. Our solution to this problem is Green Gamers. Green Gamers combines adolescent’s passion for gaming with healthy eating via in-game rewards for healthy eating. People will be able to purchase healthy food items, such as a bag of carrots, and on the packaging there will be a QR code. They will then be able to scan the code on our website, and earn points which will unlock in-game items and other rewards. Video game rewards act as effective motivators for you people to eat more healthy foods. After the solution was formulated, a preliminary survey was conducted to confirm that video game related rewards would inspire children to eat more healthy foods. Based on those results, we are currently in the process of running a secondary market research campaign to learn if gift card rewards are a stronger motivator. Our end goal for Green Gamers would be to partner with large gaming studios and food producers. This would allow us access to many gaming franchises, so that rewards are available from a wide variety of games: making the platform appealing to a diverse audience of gamers. Similarly, a relationship with large food producers would give us the ability to place QR codes on a greater assortment of healthy food items. Although no relationships with large companies have been forged yet, we plan to utilize funding to test our concept on small focus groups in schools.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05