Matching Items (7)

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The Impact of Cochlear Implants on the Quality of Life and Personhood of Cochlear Implant Users as Expressed In Patient Narratives

Description

Cochlear implants are electronic medical devices that create hearing capabilities in those with inner ear damage that results in total or partial hearing loss. The decision to get a cochlear

Cochlear implants are electronic medical devices that create hearing capabilities in those with inner ear damage that results in total or partial hearing loss. The decision to get a cochlear implant can be difficult and controversial. Cochlear implants have many physical and social impacts on cochlear implant users. The aim of this study was to evaluate how patient narratives written by people with cochlear implants (or their caregivers) express issues of quality of life and personhood related to the use of this medical device. The methodology used to answer this question was a content analysis of patient narratives. The content analysis was done using grounded theory and the constant comparative method. Two sensitizing concepts, quality of life and personhood, were used and became the large umbrella themes found in the narratives. Under the major theme of quality of life, the sub-themes that emerged were improved hearing, improved communication skills, and assimilation into the hearing world. Under the major theme of personhood, the sub-themes that emerged were confidence, self-image, and technology and the body. Another major theme, importance of education, also emerged. In general, cochlear implant users and their caregivers expressed in their narratives that cochlear implants have positive effects on the quality of life of cochlear implant users. This is because almost all of the narrative writers reported improved hearing, improved communication skills, and better assimilation into the hearing world. In addition, it was found that cochlear implants do not have a significant affect on the actual personal identity of cochlear implant users, though they do make them more confident. The majority of cochlear implant users expressed that they view the cochlear implant device as an assistive tool they use as opposed to a part of themselves. Lastly, there is a need for more awareness of or access to education and therapy for cochlear implant users.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Examining New Vocabulary Knowledge in Adults with Hearing Loss using a Generationally Neutral Vocabulary Test

Description

The purpose of the present study was to determine if vocabulary knowledge is related to degree of hearing loss. A 50-question multiple-choice vocabulary test comprised of old and new words

The purpose of the present study was to determine if vocabulary knowledge is related to degree of hearing loss. A 50-question multiple-choice vocabulary test comprised of old and new words was administered to 43 adults with hearing loss (19 to 92 years old) and 51 adults with normal hearing (20 to 40 years old). Degree of hearing loss ranged from mild to moderately-severe as determined by bilateral pure-tone thresholds. Education levels ranged from some high school to graduate degrees. It was predicted that knowledge of new words would decrease with increasing hearing loss, whereas knowledge of old words would be unaffected. The Test of Contemporary Vocabulary (TCV) was developed for this study and contained words with old and new definitions. The vocabulary scores were subjected to repeated-measures ANOVA with definition type (old and new) as the within-subjects factor. Hearing level and education were between-subjects factors, while age was entered as a covariate. The results revealed no main effect of age or education level, while a significant main effect of hearing level was observed. Specifically, performance for new words decreased significantly as degree of hearing loss increased. A similar effect was not observed for old words. These results indicate that knowledge of new definitions is inversely related to degree of hearing loss.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Effects of Acoustic Stress on the Behavior of Drosophila melanogaster

Description

Veterans are approximately 30% more likely than non-veterans to suffer from severe hearing impairment. Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, which is increasingly common among military service men and women,

Veterans are approximately 30% more likely than non-veterans to suffer from severe hearing impairment. Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, which is increasingly common among military service men and women, has been linked to significant cognitive and psychological impairment and can be worsened by the same sounds that trigger post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In fact, tinnitus and PTSD often present as comorbidities, and recent studies suggest these two disorders may share a common neurological pathway. Additional studies are required to better understand the connection between hearing loss and impaired cognitive function such as that observed in with PTSD. Here, we use the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to explore the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive function. Negative geotaxis climbing assays and courtship behavior analysis were used to examine neurobehavioral changes induced by prolonged, intense auditory stimulation. Preliminary results suggest that exposure to loud noise for an extended period of time significantly affected Drosophila behavior, with males being more sensitive than females. Based on our results, there appears to be a potential connection between noise exposure and behavior, further suggesting that Drosophila could be an effective model to study the link between hearing loss and PTSD.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Improving the Lives of Those with Hearing Loss

Description

Hearing loss is a serious condition that affects many adults and includes both age-related loss and non-age related loss (genetics, illness, or trauma). The focus of this thesis is on

Hearing loss is a serious condition that affects many adults and includes both age-related loss and non-age related loss (genetics, illness, or trauma). The focus of this thesis is on age related hearing loss. Almost half of people over the age of 75 have some degree of hearing loss, along with nearly a third of those between 65 and 74, and an eighth of 45-64 year olds. About 36 million American adults have hearing loss, and 44% of those report that their relationships have suffered as a result of hearing loss. This is a serious issue, which is why I've spent my senior year of college to create a product that improves the life of someone with hearing loss, such as my 90-year-old grandfather. The result of my labors is Suono, a product for those with hearing aids to better hear their loved ones, close friends, and others they care about.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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An Examination of Standardized Measures of Vocabulary in Children with Hearing Loss

Description

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of word type, phonotactic probability, word frequency, and neighborhood density on the vocabularies of children with mild-to-moderate hearing loss compared

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of word type, phonotactic probability, word frequency, and neighborhood density on the vocabularies of children with mild-to-moderate hearing loss compared to children with normal hearing. This was done by assigning values for these parameters to each test item on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (Version III, Form B) to quantify and characterize the performance of children with hearing loss relative to that of children with normal hearing. It was expected that PPVT IIIB scores would: 1) Decrease as the degree of hearing loss increased. 2) Increase as a function of age 3) Be more positively related to nouns than to verbs or attributes. 4) Be negatively related to phonotactic probability. 5) Be negatively related to word frequency 6) Be negatively related to neighborhood density. All but one of the expected outcomes was observed. PPVT IIIB performance decreased as hearing loss increased, and increased with age. Performance for nouns, verbs, and attributes increased with PPVT IIIB performance, whereas neighborhood density decreased. Phonotactic probability was expected to decrease as PPVT IIIB performance increased, but instead it increased due to the confounding effects of word length and the order of words on the test. Age and hearing level were rejected by the multiple regression analyses as contributors to PPVT IIIB performance for the children with hearing loss. Overall, the results indicate that there is a 2-year difference in vocabulary age between children with normal hearing and children with hearing loss, and that this may be due to factors external to the child (such as word frequency and phonotactic probability) rather than the child's age and hearing level. This suggests that children with hearing loss need continued clinical services (amplification) as well as additional support services in school throughout childhood.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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I'm not that old: how attitudes towards loss of hearing affect adoption of goods and services designed to improve qualifty of life

Description

It is well understood that many people who experience hearing loss do not realize the extent of their loss and often do not seek help. This resistance to intervention puts

It is well understood that many people who experience hearing loss do not realize the extent of their loss and often do not seek help. This resistance to intervention puts them at risk of social isolation, depression and even serious neurological issues such as dementia.

This research explores first, the attitudes that people have toward hearing loss and how these attitudes affect the adoption of products and services that could help them. This may not seem like a design question, but it is paramount to designers who seek to improve the quality of life for this population. It is no longer enough to create beautiful, functional products. In order to make a difference in people’s lives, designers need to understand the underlying motivations that drive behavior. This informs the second question this study seeks to answer, what changes can be made to current products and services on the market in order to increase adoption.

Through a series of qualitative interviews with seniors experiencing hearing loss, this study finds that the main factors in their attitudes towards hearing loss are their feelings towards aging in general, their susceptibility to stigma, and their perceptions of the cost and functionality of the hearing devices available. However, the most important factor found in this study is a lack of awareness. Awareness of their own level of hearing loss. Awareness of the risks associated with putting off intervention. And awareness of the products and services available to help. Thus, design solutions that focus on visibility of services and patient education will have the most meaningful impact on quality of life for those who suffer from hearing loss.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Novel-Word Learning in Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss

Description

Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine how vocabulary size and inhibitory control affect word learning in bilingual (English-Spanish) children with hearing loss. Experiment 1 examined whether children

Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine how vocabulary size and inhibitory control affect word learning in bilingual (English-Spanish) children with hearing loss. Experiment 1 examined whether children with larger vocabularies learn and retain more words than children with smaller vocabularies. Experiment 2 examined whether children with better inhibitory control learn and remember more words than children with poorer inhibitory control. In addition, monolingual and bilingual children with and without hearing loss were compared on word learning and inhibitory control tasks.

Method: Seventy-three children between 8 and 12 years of age participated in the study. Forty children had normal hearing (20 monolingual and 20 bilingual) and 33 had hearing loss (20 monolingual and 13 bilingual). For Experiment 1, children completed a receptive vocabulary test in English and Spanish and three word learning tasks consisting of a training and a retention component in English, Spanish, and Arabic. For Experiment 2, children completed the flanker task for inhibitory control.

Results: In Experiment 1, larger total (English + Spanish) receptive vocabularies were predictive of better word training outcomes in all languages and better Spanish word retention, after controlling for age, degree of hearing loss, and maternal education. Children with hearing loss performed more poorly in Spanish and Arabic word training and retention than children with normal hearing. No differences were observed between children with normal hearing and hearing loss in English word learning. In Experiment 2, inhibitory control only predicted English retention outcomes. Children with hearing loss showed poorer inhibitory control than hearing peers. No differences were observed between monolingual and bilingual children, with and without hearing loss, in word learning or inhibitory control.

Conclusions: Language experience (measured by total vocabulary size) helps children learn new words and therefore children with hearing loss should receive well-fitted hearing aids and school accommodations to provide them with access to spoken language. Bilingual exposure does not impair nor facilitate word learning. Bilingual children showed similar difficulties with word learning and inhibitory control as monolingual peers with hearing loss. Hearing loss, probably via language deprivation, has broad effects on children’s executive function skills.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019