Matching Items (6)

Long-Term Associations Between Wind Speeds and the Urban Heat Island of Phoenix, Arizona

Description

The association between a developing urban heat island and local monthly averaged wind speeds is examined in this investigation. Results from a series of statistical analyses show a significant increase

The association between a developing urban heat island and local monthly averaged wind speeds is examined in this investigation. Results from a series of statistical analyses show a significant increase in wind speeds in Phoenix, Arizona during the period of rapid heat island development. The increase in winds is found to be much stronger at 0500 MST than at 1400 MST. Increased instability and the development of a strong heat low circulation in the urban environment are suggested as probable causes for the increased wind speeds.

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  • 1987-06-01

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Analyzing Roof to Wall Attachment Systems A Micro-Analysis Leading to a Shift in Approaching Hurricane Compliance Incentives

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As construction and building methods advance so should their focus on reconstruction post-natural disasters. For the past 50 years there has been an average of 6.2 hurricanes making landfall, and

As construction and building methods advance so should their focus on reconstruction post-natural disasters. For the past 50 years there has been an average of 6.2 hurricanes making landfall, and several recent unfortunate occurrences in the past year that have caused immeasurable damage and taken priceless lives (Chris Landsea 2017). Damages could have been significantly reduced to residential homes and lives saved if proper, hurricane-resistant construction was used. It is important to continue advancement in efficient planning and reconstructive methods to restore individuals into their homes and ensure their safety in the future. Utilizing tested resilient building methods may increase construction costs but has a visible payoff through mitigation of economic losses in the future. This can also help develop response and mitigation plans based on the very specific conditions of each community or affected location. To do so, it is crucial to continue research and test various methods of construction and materials in residential homes. This study was a comparative analysis of the current roof systems implemented in residential homes, the role of hurricane testing facilities in maintaining building codes, and how damage incurred by hurricanes can be significantly reduced through a shift in the approach of homeowner insurance incentive. The purpose of this study was to provide a feasible and practicable solution for increasing implementation of hurricane resistant construction into homes. The results of this analysis concluded that there is a low percentage of homeowners investing in making their homes hurricane resilient. By re-inventing the incentive methods that insurance companies offer, this problem can step into the right direction in making more homes hurricane resilient consequently reducing damages, deaths, and economic loss.

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  • 2018-05

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An Evaluation of Wind Energy in the Urban Environment

Description

The global energy demand is expected to grow significantly in the next several decades and support for energy generation with high carbon emissions is continuing to decline. Alternative methods have

The global energy demand is expected to grow significantly in the next several decades and support for energy generation with high carbon emissions is continuing to decline. Alternative methods have gained interest, and wind energy has established itself as a viable source. Standard wind farms have limited room for growth and improvement, so wind energy has started to explore different directions. The urban environment is a potential direction for wind energy due to its proximity to the bulk of energy demand. CFD analysis has demonstrated that the presence of buildings can accelerate wind speeds between buildings and on rooftops. However, buildings generate areas of increased turbulence at their surface. The turbulence thickness and intensity vary with roof shape, building height, and building orientation. The analysis has concluded that good wind resource is possible in the urban environment in specific locations. With that, turbine selection becomes very important. A comparison has concluded that vertical axis wind turbines are more useful in the urban environment than horizontal axis wind turbines. Furthermore, building-augmented wind turbines are recommended because they are architecturally integrated into a building for the specific purpose of generating more energy. The research has concluded that large-scale generation in the urban environment is unlikely to be successful, but small-scale generation is quite viable. Continued research and investigation on urban wind energy is recommended.

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  • 2014-05

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Climate Teleconnection Influences on Low-Level Wind Speeds over the Great Plains

Description

The Great Plains region of the central United States and southern Canada is a promising location for wind energy resource development. Wind energy site assessments and forecasts can benefit from

The Great Plains region of the central United States and southern Canada is a promising location for wind energy resource development. Wind energy site assessments and forecasts can benefit from better understanding the variability that may result from several teleconnections affecting North America. This thesis investigates how the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Pacific/North American Pattern (PNA) impact mean monthly wind speeds at 850 hPa over the Great Plains. Using wind speeds from the NCAR/NCEP Reanalysis 1, correlations were computed between the mean monthly wind speeds and average monthly teleconnection index values. A difference of means test was used to compute the change in wind speeds between the positive and negative phases of each index. ENSO was not found to have a significant impact on wind speeds, while the NAO and PNA patterns weakly affected wind speeds. The NAO index was positively (negatively) correlated with wind speeds over the northern (southern) plains, while the PNA index was negatively correlated with wind speeds over most of the plains. Even a small change in wind speed can have a large effect on the potential power output, so the effects of these teleconnections should be considered in wind resource assessments and climatologies.

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  • 2013-05

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An annotated bibliography of symphonies for wind band

Description

This study catalogues symphonies for wind band from the origin of the genre in the late eighteenth century through 2014. Wind bands include any mixed wind group of eight

This study catalogues symphonies for wind band from the origin of the genre in the late eighteenth century through 2014. Wind bands include any mixed wind group of eight or more players. Works using the word "symphony" or its derivatives in the title are included in the study. A total of 1342 works that fit these criteria were identified. An annotated bibliography (Appendix A) includes detailed information about 695 of these works. Such information was not available for an additional 621 wind band symphonies; consequently, these works are listed in a second appendix that includes a list of sources for each work so that future researchers might investigate them further. The final appendix lists 26 wind band symphonies that are no longer available based on the author's current sources.

The titles included in this study were found by examining many repertoire resources for the wind band, including previous studies of wind band symphonies and more comprehensive repertoire resources like the Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music and the website "The Wind Repertory Project." Details of each piece in the annotated bibliography were found in their scores whenever possible. Contact with composers and publishers, through both their websites and direct correspondence, played a major role in this part of the study. The classified bibliography in this document sorts all of these sources categorically for easy reference. All parts of this document are intended as tools for conductors wishing to research or program symphonies for wind band.

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  • 2015

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Renewable energy in rural southeastern Arizona: decision factors : a comparison of the consumer profiles of homeowners who purchased renewable energy systems with those who performed other home upgrades or remodeling projects

Description

Arizona has an abundant solar resource and technologically mature systems are available to capture it, but solar energy systems are still considered to be an innovative technology. Adoption rates for

Arizona has an abundant solar resource and technologically mature systems are available to capture it, but solar energy systems are still considered to be an innovative technology. Adoption rates for solar and wind energy systems rise and fall with the political tides, and are relatively low in most rural areas in Arizona. This thesis tests the hypothesis that a consumer profile developed to characterize the adopters of renewable energy technology (RET) systems in rural Arizona is the same as the profile of other area residents who performed renovations, upgrades or additions to their homes. Residents of Santa Cruz and Cochise Counties who had obtained building permits to either install a solar or wind energy system or to perform a substantial renovation or upgrade to their home were surveyed to gather demographic, psychographic and behavioristic data. The data from 133 survey responses (76 from RET adopters and 57 from non-adopters) provided insights about their decisions regarding whether or not to adopt a RET system. The results, which are statistically significant at the 99% level of confidence, indicate that RET adopters had smaller households, were older and had higher education levels and greater income levels than the non-adopters. The research also provides answers to three related questions: First, are the energy conservation habits of RET adopters the same as those of non-adopters? Second, what were the sources of information consulted and the most important factors that motivated the decision to purchase a solar or wind energy system? And finally, are any of the factors which influenced the decision to live in a rural area in southeastern Arizona related to the decision to purchase a renewable energy system? The answers are provided, along with a series of recommendations that are designed to inform marketers and other promoters of RETs about how to utilize these results to help achieve their goals.

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Date Created
  • 2011