Matching Items (7)

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Through It All: Toilets, Wrestling, and Anxiety

Description

Anxiety is currently the most prevalent mental disorder in America with over 4 million people struggling with it every day. I am one of those millions. This book explores the

Anxiety is currently the most prevalent mental disorder in America with over 4 million people struggling with it every day. I am one of those millions. This book explores the multitude of coping mechanisms that I have learned and developed through my time with anxiety, covering everything from humor to finding the motivation to change. It is a creative non-fiction autobiography that depicts detailed moments from my own life that provide advice and tools for managing anxiety that are made accessible to people who may have completely different experiences from my own. While anxiety has always played a huge roll in my life, it wasn't until I got to college that I decided to finally begin taking the steps I needed to in order to see the changes that I wanted to see. I am a teacher, and every day I see many of my students battling with the exact pains and stresses that I always have. This book is for all of my future students as well as all the adolescents out there who feel like nobody really understands; the ones who all they need is a little direction and the confidence to know they're not alone.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Words I'd Say: A Poetic Autobiography

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Poetry serves as a window through which we can convey emotions and experiences otherwise difficult to access and express. This chapbook addresses the moments in life that have dramatic transformational

Poetry serves as a window through which we can convey emotions and experiences otherwise difficult to access and express. This chapbook addresses the moments in life that have dramatic transformational effects and those moments and events we wish to deny. Through my poetry, I reveal the honest revelations of hurt and pain, and the raw emotions evoked from the things that have occurred throughout my life. In doing so, I confront these painful experiences from a place of conscious awareness of the way in which they have impacted my life, and I allow others access to my hurt, self-hatred, and imperfection acknowledged throughout. This chapbook symbolizes the movement from a place of denial to a place of awareness and finally to a place of transformation and growth. As my poetry transformed from weak poems only accessible on an abstract level to powerful poems of honest and tangible pain and hurt, I experienced my own transformation. Allowing myself to candidly share my experiences with others has enabled me to grow from these experiences.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Utilizing IMT and KSM to Understand the Causes of Depression

Description

Information Measurement Theory (IMT) is a concept which was devised for the purpose of understanding how information works in the universe. At its core, it states that 100% of information

Information Measurement Theory (IMT) is a concept which was devised for the purpose of understanding how information works in the universe. At its core, it states that 100% of information exists in the universe at any one time, and with enough perception, any event can be predicted based on the initial conditions preceding the event. With this idea in mind, the author of IMT developed the Kashiwagi Solution Model (KSM) which deals with how people best utilize the information present in the universe. Simply put, the ideas presented by KSM encourage people to think in a more logical manner through the utilization of relevant information. The following thesis details an autobiographical case study which focuses on the life of a college student undergoing severe depressive symptoms during the course of their academic career. The usage of concepts stemming from IMT and KSM are then used to determine the root causes of the depression in order to prevent it from ever happening again. The case study acts as a guide to others in order to better help them deal with similar situations that are happening with their lives while providing evidence that the concepts detailed by IMT and KSM are factually relevant.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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I am the Other: Alterity, Self, and Redemptive Suffering in Autobiography

Description

This project charts the development of autobiography as a genre through two pairs of writers: Benjamin Franklin and Jean-Jacques Rousseau of the Enlightenment, and Oscar Wilde and James Weldon Johnson

This project charts the development of autobiography as a genre through two pairs of writers: Benjamin Franklin and Jean-Jacques Rousseau of the Enlightenment, and Oscar Wilde and James Weldon Johnson of the fin de siècle, leading into the twentieth century. The Enlightenment thinkers took an Augustinian confessional approach to the autobiography as a genre, revealing their flawed selves to the public in order to make themselves both authentic and virtuous. Through both these writers, autobiography became a way to replace the religious precepts of the Middle Ages, as the flawed self could be redeemed through society in its current historical moment rather than God. Franklin’s autobiography shows how self-making through economic credit is conducive to virtue, while Rousseau turned inward toward a natural goodness lacking in corrupt social relations. Despite their differences, both furthered the development of autobiography as an account of authentic self-making.

The fin de siècle writers fictionalized the autobiography and derived a concept of authenticity that develops from the suffering of social otherness. Wilde praised the poor over the bourgeois in a British Philistine society, while Johnson’s narrator argued for the authenticity of an African-American class striving for economic and social justice. Both writers redeemed suffering through the ideals of the subjective self, a turn inward that resembles Rousseau’s own look into his natural, innermost self. Overall, this project focuses on how the development of the genre between these two pairs of thinkers gives multiple accounts of self-making leading to the social Other becoming an agent for authenticity; how is the self to be read, understood, and made authentic through its imperfections and sufferings? The fictionality of the later works casts an overarching question: is attaining authenticity through autobiography merely fictional?

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Performativity, positionality, and relationality: identity pathways for a feminist rhetorical pedagogy

Description

This dissertation posits that a relationship between a feminist rhetorical pedagogical model and autobiographical theoretical tenets engage students in the personal writing process and introduce them to the ways that

This dissertation posits that a relationship between a feminist rhetorical pedagogical model and autobiographical theoretical tenets engage students in the personal writing process and introduce them to the ways that feminism can change the approach, analysis, and writing of autobiographical texts. Inadequate attention has been given to the ways that autobiographical theory and the use of non-fiction texts contribute to a feminist pedagogy in upper-level writing classrooms. This dissertation corrects that by focusing on food memoirs as vehicles in a feminist pedagogical writing course. Strands of both feminist and autobiographical theory prioritize performativity, positionality, and relationality (Smith and Watson 214) as dynamic components of identity construction and thus become frames through which this class was taught and studied. I theorize these “enabling concepts” (Smith and Watson 217) as identity pathways that lead to articulation of identity and experience in written work.

This study posits that Royster and Kirsch’s four feminist rhetorical practices— Critical Imagination, Social Circulation, Strategic Contemplation, and Globalizing Point of View (19)—taken together offer a model for instruction geared to help learners chart identity pathways in the context of one semester of their undergraduate rhetorical education. This model is operationalized through a writing classroom that focused on feminist ideals, using a food memoir, The Language of Baklava by Diana Abu-Jaber, as the vehicle of inquiry. This study offers a starting point for analysis of food memoirs in university writing classrooms by focusing specifically on the ways that students understood and applied the framework, model, and vehicle of the study. This dissertation prioritizes the composition and valuing of individual and communal lived experiences expressed through the articulation of identity pathways. Teachers and scholars can use the knowledge and takeaways gained in the study to better support and advocate for the inclusion of the students lived experiences in writing classrooms and pedagogy.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Otherworldly figures: rhetoric, representation and the public performance of femininity in nineteenth-century spirit mediums' autobiographies

Description

This dissertation theorizes nineteenth-century public performance of spiritual media as being inherent to the production of autobiography itself. Too often, dominant social discourses are cast as being singular cultural phenomena,

This dissertation theorizes nineteenth-century public performance of spiritual media as being inherent to the production of autobiography itself. Too often, dominant social discourses are cast as being singular cultural phenomena, but analyzing the rhetorical strategies of women attempting to access public spheres reveals fractures in what would otherwise appear to be a monolithic patriarchal discourse. These women's resistant performances reap the benefits of a fractured discourse to reveal a multiplicity of alternative discourses that can be accessed and leveraged to gain social power. By examining the phenomena of four nineteenth- century Spiritualists' mediumship from a rhetorical perspective, this study considers how female spirit mediums used their autobiographies to operate as discursive spaces mediating between private and public spheres; how female mediums constructed themselves in the public sphere as women and as spiritual authorities; how they negotiated entry into volatile and unpredictable publics; how they conceived of the vulnerability of the female body in the public sphere; and how they coped with complications inherent to Victorian era constructions of feminine corporeality. In conclusion, this dissertation offers a highly situated performative theory of subaltern publicity.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Autobiography as political resistance: Anne Moody's Coming of age in Mississippi

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ABSTRACT This dissertation focuses on Anne Moody's use of the autobiographical genre as an extension of her political activism. Noting consistent values and conventions that govern the writing of political

ABSTRACT This dissertation focuses on Anne Moody's use of the autobiographical genre as an extension of her political activism. Noting consistent values and conventions that govern the writing of political activists, this study asserts that Moody's narrative is best situated in the genre of political autobiography--a term coined by Angela Davis. Using Margo V. Perkins' text as a base to define autobiography as activism, this dissertation illustrates the consistent values that characterize Moody's narrative as political autobiography, resistance literature, and ultimately Black Power literature. Building on the works of Joanne Braxton, Patricia Hill Collins, Angela Davis, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, bell hooks, Margo V. Perkins, Assata Shakur, and Johnny Stover, this project demonstrates the use of Moody's autobiography as a collective form of resistance that is reflective of autobiography as activism. To frame its argument, this study theorizes how one comes into revolutionary consciousness, demonstrating the move toward activism as a process. Drawing on Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson's autobiographical theory that the "narrated I" is distinguished from the "narrating I," this study asserts, as Francoise Lionnet suggests, that the "narrating I" is the vehicle to deliver recollections relevant to the autobiographer's agenda. This study emphasizes that the early version of the self Moody creates is consciously linked to her role as a future activist, ultimately demonstrating her political evolution through the emphatic linking of the personal and political. Most importantly, this dissertation demonstrates that Moody's text represents a continuity--an autobiographical bridge--between representations of the Christian nonviolent civil rights movement and the Black Power movement of the late 1960's. This study argues that Moody's autobiography is ideologically poised at the intersection of civil rights and Black Power; therefore, it serves as both a civil rights autobiography and a Black Power autobiography. Coming of Age in Mississippi offers a unique contribution to the genre of Black Power autobiography for the way it facilitates unprecedented insight into the transition from non-violent civil rights ideology to revolutionary consciousness.

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Date Created
  • 2011