Matching Items (4)

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Improving Runway Capacity at Minneapolis St. Paul Airport

Description

Airports are a vital part of the United States' transportation infrastructure. A variety of factors impact the amount of aircraft that an airport can handle per hour. One of these

Airports are a vital part of the United States' transportation infrastructure. A variety of factors impact the amount of aircraft that an airport can handle per hour. One of these factors is the runway capacity. Strict rules regarding the amount of separation required between two aircraft landing at the same airport and lack of available land limit the ways that airport managers and planners can tackle this problem. Research was conducted at the Arizona State University's Simulator Building using the Adacel Tower Simulation System. Modifications to the airport were then made to simulate the high speed exit. Testing utilized aircraft in the large category, including Airbus A320s, which are regularly seen at the airport. Airport capacity dramatically increased as a result. The previous AAR was 33. With the research conducted, aircraft can exit the runway between 27 and 30 seconds with final approach speeds ranging from 130 knots to 150 knots. To allow for a margin for safety, a 35 second runway occupancy time is used. With that rate, assuming that other separation standards are changed to accommodate that traffic level, the runway AAR increases to approximately 100. To reach this potential, changes to the FAAs separation requirements for aircraft on the same final approach course must be made, to allow aircraft to be closer together.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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2014 Phoenix Flight Path Changes: A Good Thing?

Description

Noise abatement is a current and ever-changing issue that leaves some groups satisfied and others dissatisfied. Given that noise is a natural byproduct of aviation, it is the duty of

Noise abatement is a current and ever-changing issue that leaves some groups satisfied and others dissatisfied. Given that noise is a natural byproduct of aviation, it is the duty of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to mitigate noise pollution and the effects that it has on the surrounding community. With the FAA currently progressing to modernize the National Airspace System, communities around the United States have expressed their concerns regarding changes of flight paths, notably the City of Phoenix. Public unrest has increased intensively since the implementation of Performance Based Navigation (PBN) departure procedures in September of 2014. The unrest has allegedly stemmed from a lack of consultation from the Federal Aviation Administration to the City of Phoenix and surrounding communities. Documented complaints have not only been filed by the City, but also by National Prehistoric Preservation areas within the valley. The City of Phoenix and the State of Arizona filed a lawsuit against the FAA to dispute the flight path changes. The court ruled in favor of Arizona and required the FAA to revert to the flight paths that were in place before the changes. This paper is an immersion into the current state of what has occurred within the Phoenix Terminal Airspace (PTA), the effects that the changes have had on the natural and social environment, the FAA, and the NextGen initiative which the FAA is said to be implementing. This paper will also inform the reader of how a departure procedure is created, how the public can stay better informed of what the FAA is planning, and possible long-term solutions that will satisfy both the environmental and modernization requirements placed on the PTA.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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ANALYSIS OF THE OWNERSHIP AND OPERATION OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWERS

Description

My project analyzes the air traffic control tower (ATCT) system of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to determine if a rebalancing of ATCT ownership and operation should occur. The government

My project analyzes the air traffic control tower (ATCT) system of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to determine if a rebalancing of ATCT ownership and operation should occur. The government currently faces a problem of a tight financial budget and sequestration, which often times means mandatory budget cuts. This project provides one possible solution for the FAA to save money in their budget without adversely affecting safety. The FAA could establish appropriate criteria to compare all ATCTs. The FAA could then apply these criteria in a policy that would contract the operation of certain low-level ATCTs and conversely handle the operations at high-activity ATCTs. Additionally, the FAA could include a policy to transfer the ownership of certain low-activity towers, but transfer the ownership of high-activity towers to the FAA. The research was completed by studying various documents from the FAA, Department of Transportation (DOT), and industry groups. Most of the data analysis was conducted by creating tables, queries, and graphs from FAA data. The FAA data was found on their Air Traffic Activity Data System (ATADS). From my data analysis, I was able to identify sixty-nine ATCTs that are currently operated by the FAA that could become federal contract towers (FCT) and forty-six FCTs that could be operated by the FAA. Each FCT saves the FAA approximately $1.488 million, so the FAA could save $34.2 million per year by implementing my solutions. I have also established sample criteria for determining which ATCTs could be maintained by the FAA.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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The effect of situation presence assessment method (SPAM) on air traffic control students' workload and performance in high-fidelity simulations

Description

This study examined the impact of Situation Presence Assessment Method (SPAM) administration on air traffic control (ATC) students’ task workload and performance in high-fidelity ATC simulations. ATC students performed high-fidelity

This study examined the impact of Situation Presence Assessment Method (SPAM) administration on air traffic control (ATC) students’ task workload and performance in high-fidelity ATC simulations. ATC students performed high-fidelity en-route simulations in two conditions: baseline conditions (without SPAM questions) and SPAM conditions. The data collected show that while workload in the two conditions were not significantly different, there was a trend of higher mental workload in SPAM conditions than in baseline conditions. Performance immediately following SPAM questions was revealed to be poorer than that preceding the SPAM questions and that over the equivalent time periods in the baseline conditions. The results suggest that a "Ready" signal before a SPAM question may not be enough to eliminate the impact of SPAM administration on ATC students’ workload and performance in high-fidelity en-route simulations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016