Matching Items (5)

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A Prediction-Based Study Of Lean Methodologies In Hospital Emergency Departments

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This study analyzes the various applications of Lean Methodologies in emergency departments (ED) from the years 2005 through 2010. These data were then used to create a predictive model that

This study analyzes the various applications of Lean Methodologies in emergency departments (ED) from the years 2005 through 2010. These data were then used to create a predictive model that hospitals can use to assess the benefits of using lean within their ED. Metrics studied include 1) rate of patients that left the ED without being seen 2) length of stay and 3) overall patient satisfaction. These metrics were extracted from published studies and used to create a linear regression model, which could be applied to an ED to predict its status after implementing a lean project. After developing these formulas, they were applied to the ED of fictional hospital T-1 in order to predict benefit. After determining the approximate values for the post-lean metrics, an estimate of the financial benefit was developed in conjunction with a financial executive at Chandler Regional Medical Center, in Chandler, Arizona.

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  • 2016-12

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Homeless Individuals' Perceptions of Welcomeness versus Unwelcomeness by Emergency Department Staff

Description

Homelessness has a history of existing as a misunderstood condition involving stereotypes, stigmas and assumptions. In fact, the combination of acute-care medical professionals with patients of chronic illness and chronic

Homelessness has a history of existing as a misunderstood condition involving stereotypes, stigmas and assumptions. In fact, the combination of acute-care medical professionals with patients of chronic illness and chronic homelessness can lead to incongruity of attitudes. These mindsets have the potential to affect the care homeless individuals receive in the emergency department (ED) and impact their intentions to seek medical help in the future (Ugarriza & Fallon, 1994, pp. 26). Furthermore, homeless individuals account for 54.5% of all ED visits in the United States (Kushel et al., 2002). The author conducted a qualitative descriptive study of 10 in-person interviews with homeless individuals in the downtown Phoenix, AZ area. The objective was to determine homeless individuals' perceptions of welcomeness and unwelcomeness by emergency department staff. Findings support significantly unwelcome experiences in the ED and negative perceptions of ED staff through repeating concepts of dehumanization, dismissal, stereotypes and discrimination. Further research is needed to create interventions for improving perceptions of ED staff, promoting health and preventing illness in the homeless population, and reducing ED visits by homeless individuals.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

Substituting Hospitals: An Analysis of Urgent Care Centers in the Market for Healthcare

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The primary purpose of this paper is to analyze urgent care centers and explain their role within the U.S. healthcare system. The introduction of urgent care into the market for

The primary purpose of this paper is to analyze urgent care centers and explain their role within the U.S. healthcare system. The introduction of urgent care into the market for health care services has brought with it a new way for consumers to receive non-emergent healthcare outside of traditional hours. Urgent care is often cited as a plausible alternative to care received at an emergency department or primary care physician's office. One of the key questions the author attempts to answer is: "To what degree are urgent care centers an economic substitute to emergency departments or physician's offices?" This paper looks at both projected demand from currently operating urgent care centers and consumer preference surveys to estimate the willingness of consumers to use urgent care. The method used to accomplish this task has been compiling scholarly research and data on urgent care centers. After a thorough examination of relevant studies and datasets, urgent care centers have been found to be just as preferred as emergency departments when considering non-emergent cases, specifically among individuals aged 18-44. The clear majority of consumers still prefer visiting a primary care physician over an urgent care center when it comes to episodic care, however. When taking into account wait times, differences in cost, and ease of access, urgent care becomes much more preferred than an emergency department and weakly preferred to a physician's office. There are still some concerns with urgent care, however. Questions of capacity to meet demand, access for underserved communities, and susceptibility to adverse selection have yet to be fully explored.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Operations Research Contributions to Emergency Department Patient Flow Optimization: A Review

Description

In recent years, Operations Research (OR) has had a signicant impact on improving the performance of hospital Emergency Departments (EDs). This includes improving a wide range of processes involving patient

In recent years, Operations Research (OR) has had a signicant impact on improving the performance of hospital Emergency Departments (EDs). This includes improving a wide range of processes involving patient ow from the initial call to the ED through disposition, discharge home, or admission to the hospital. We mainly seek to illustrate the benet of OR in EDs, and provide an overview of research performed in this vein to assist both researchers and practitioners. We also elaborate on possibilities for future researchers by shedding light on some less studied aspects that can have valuable impacts on practice.

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Date Created
  • 2013-12

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Physician Assistant Utilization in the Emergency Department Increases Satisfaction Scores

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As a medical scribe working in an Emergency Department (ED) at Banner Gateway Medical Center (BGMC), the researcher was able to identify how the work flow and satisfaction of those

As a medical scribe working in an Emergency Department (ED) at Banner Gateway Medical Center (BGMC), the researcher was able to identify how the work flow and satisfaction of those in the ED would decrease when there were no Physician Assistants (PA's) being utilized during specific shifts. As for other shifts where PA's were on shift and were being utilized, the work flow would drastically increase, more patients would be seen in less time and the satisfaction of the researchers co-workers would increase. This paradigm of how PA's are implemented brought the researcher to understand the overall success of having Physicians Assistants in partnership with Physicians, consulting physicians and management in the ED. The researcher conducted a five-month long analyses of how implementation of Physician Assistants in the ED could effect overall satisfaction. The researcher looked at the satisfaction of the PAs themselves, attending physicians, nurses, nursing assistants, ED manager, ED director, ED co-director and the patients themselves. The researcher collected questionnaires, conducted interviews and retrieved data from Banner Health Services for the year 2014 to compare her data. The researcher conducted the study both at Banner Gateway Medical Center (BGMC) Emergency Department and also at Banner Baywood Medical Center (BBMC) ED. In comparison of the data collected from BGMC ED to BBMC ED resulted in a significant difference in overall satisfaction based on implementation. Although both emergency departments are owned by the same Banner corporation and only a few miles apart in distance, they implement Pas differently. The difference in the implementation did prove to effect the overall satisfaction. BGMC ED employees as well as manager and patients were more satisfied than those of BBMC ED. Some of the noted differences were that BBMC PAs see more patients per hour, they see higher acuity patients, are less compensated, are placed further apart from their attending physicians and other staff in the ED, there is minimal communication, PAs feel there voice is not heard and they feel pushback on feedback with no plan for improvement. BGMC PAs reported overall increase in satisfaction as compared to BBMC because of the increased communication, placement of PAs within the ED is closer to attending physicians and other staff, they see lower acuity patients, are better compensated and monthly meetings on improvements that can be made and the PAs feel their voice is being heard. Productivity scores for BGMC ED PAs were 1.71 patients per hour as compare to BBMC ED which was 1.86 patients per hour. BBMC PA patient satisfaction on average was 60.6 as compared to BGMC where the PA average satisfaction was 67.8.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05