Matching Items (6)

Illustrator's Flat Signature in "The Novels and Stories of Richard Harding Davis"

Description

This edition includes the flat signature of Illustrator Charles Dana Gibson on the frontispiece in "Gallegher, and other stories"; and a second signature in "Soldiers of Fortune". This is a

This edition includes the flat signature of Illustrator Charles Dana Gibson on the frontispiece in "Gallegher, and other stories"; and a second signature in "Soldiers of Fortune". This is a limited-edition, 256-copy run of "The novels and stories of Richard Harding Davis" [v. 4]. Richard Harding Davis, author, 1864-1916.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-04-19

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Your Best American Girl: Memoirs of Tradition and Identity

Description

Through a series of memoirs, this project explores the way familial tradition catalyzes individual identity-building. Themes explored in these flash memoirs, and addressed within the accompanying theoretical framework, include matrilineal

Through a series of memoirs, this project explores the way familial tradition catalyzes individual identity-building. Themes explored in these flash memoirs, and addressed within the accompanying theoretical framework, include matrilineal divinity, intergenerational trauma, performance as a vehicle for identity-building, reconstruction and reconfiguration, and physicality as performance. The theoretical framework at the beginning of the project gives explanation for some creative decisions that drive the narratives and convey the themes in these stories. Chronology of stories, story choice and device use (symbolism, allegory) are explained. The memoirs all come from the student author's experiences growing up in rural Missouri, in a family dominated by women. The author is a standup comedian and actress in the Phoenix area, and saw literary storytelling as a challenging way to share a personal narrative that has informed much of her comedic and dramatic work. This series of five memoirs is the foundation for a fuller series of 25-40 memoirs that the author hopes to complete over the next several years.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Mickey Gilbert: My Grandmother's Valuable Life

Description

My grandmother, Mickey Gilbert, is the daughter of Italian immigrants, Clemente Saulino and Anna Moccia, who married in Italy and moved to a small mining town called Lynch, Kentucky in

My grandmother, Mickey Gilbert, is the daughter of Italian immigrants, Clemente Saulino and Anna Moccia, who married in Italy and moved to a small mining town called Lynch, Kentucky in 1928, the year before my grandmother was born. Her family moved to an apartment in Cumberland, Kentucky where Clemente started a dry-cleaning business. Grandma's sister, Berenice, was born in 1931 and then her mother had a child every five years for 15 years, adding Joanne, Joe, and Tom to the family. Her family was religious and attended church every Sunday and holy day. Grandma went to a Catholic boarding school called St. Camillus Academy in Corbin, Kentucky from third grade through high school, spending holidays and summer vacations at home in Cumberland. She graduated in 1946 and attended Villa Madonna College in Covington, Kentucky that fall. She lived with three girls \u2014 Mary Catherine, Sara Lou, and Eulalie \u2014 at St. Joseph Heights, which was run by nuns. She spent a good amount of her holidays at Mary Catherine "Juggie's" home in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky which was closer than her own home in Cumberland. That is where she met my grandpa, Colly Gilbert. She graduated from Villa Madonna in 1950 with a B.A. in history and a secondary education teaching certificate. She married Allen Carlton "Colly" Gilbert, the youngest of seven children and a World War II veteran, in 1951 and they moved to Phoenix, Arizona where they had seven children: Anne, Carlton, Kelly, Monica, Marydith, Eileen (my mother), and Mark. Unfortunately, Colly lost a battle with kidney cancer in 1971 when their youngest child, Mark, was only ten years old. Grandma raised their children on her own after that and never remarried. She kept busy even after her children moved out by taking up gardening, knitting, and volunteering. She also spent time playing the piano and reading books. All of her children married, and all had at least one child except Carlton. Grandma has thirteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren who all adore her. Anne, Carlton, Kelly, Monica, Marydith, and Mark eventually settled in different cities or states. My mother, Eileen, was the only one that stayed in Phoenix. She actually bought the house that her dad had built \u2014 the house that she grew up in \u2014 from my grandmother in 1992, and my grandmother moved to a patio home at Arcadia Green, less than a mile away. My grandma is an inspiration to our family. She taught us all the importance of enjoying the simple things in life and doing what we can for people. The values that she has passed on to us and the activities that she has inspired us to love make us healthier and happier people. Her parents instilled in her a love of family, friends, and life that she passed on to her children, and her children passed on to their children. Our family is close because of her \u2014 she is our lifeline. Her legacy is the tight bonds our family has woven.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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"After Papa Died": A Mexican-American Autobiography Annotated and Edited by Shea Van Slyke

Description

Zoraida Ladrón de Guevarra was born in 1936 in Coyula, Mexico, a small village in the state of Oaxaca. Her father’s passing required Zoraida to find a job at age

Zoraida Ladrón de Guevarra was born in 1936 in Coyula, Mexico, a small village in the state of Oaxaca. Her father’s passing required Zoraida to find a job at age fourteen to support her family. Her story, a 200-page memoir entitled “After Papa Died,” follows Zoraida’s time as a servant and eventual nanny in Veracruz. Flashing back to memories of her hometown and the people living in it, the story ends before she enters America first as a visitor in 1954, and later on a working Visa in 1957—the first woman in her village to leave to the United States. Hers is a story relevant today, evident with the paradoxes explored between poverty and riches, patriarchy and matriarchy, freedom and captivity. Assimilation impacts the reading of this memoir, as Zoraida began writing the memoir in her 80s (around fifty years after gaining American citizenship). This detailed family history is about the nature of memory, community, and in particular, the experience of being an immigrant. This thesis project centers on this text and includes three components: an edited memoir, informational interviews, and an introduction. Beginning as a diary steeped in the tradition of oral history, the memoir required a “translation” into a written form; chapters and chronological continuity helped with organization. Topics of interest from the story, such as identity, domestic violence, and religion, are further explored in a series of interviews with Zoraida. The inclusion of an introduction to the text contextualizes the stories documented in the memoir with supplemental information. The contents of the project are housed on a website: alongwaybabyproject.net.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Connecting with Soldiers: A Civilian's Reflection

Description

In a cross memoir and essay format, I examine what connection barriers veterans face when communicating with civilians. I interviewed veterans after adapting an interview schedule and model release form.

In a cross memoir and essay format, I examine what connection barriers veterans face when communicating with civilians. I interviewed veterans after adapting an interview schedule and model release form. Additionally, I researched creative nonfiction, guided autobiography, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. I chose to focus mainly on soldiers returning from recent conflicts. Once I collected my interviews, I synthesized the stories I heard with personal memoir. The thesis focuses on three parts: coming home, communication barriers, and connection. Weaving in both my personal reflection and the voices of the soldiers I interviewed, I evaluate possible ways veterans and civilians fail to connect. I address the discrepancy between the apparent warm reception of soldiers and the feelings of disconnection soldiers express by noting the ways in which both the solider and the civilian struggle to communicate. Looking at reintegration struggles, I briefly note the transition difficulty post deployment soldiers face. From the responses I received, I reflect on how empty gestures, perceived ignorance, and an outsider effect contribute to communication barriers between soldiers and veterans. While I address how ignorance can be broken down into misunderstanding military jargon, detaching from war, hearing euphemisms, and having expectations, I also consider the ways in which situation and vagueness surrounding the war contribute to communication barriers surrounding perceived ignorance. From my reflection of communication barriers, I offer tools for soldiers and veterans making connections. I recommend that both soldiers and civilians stay informed about the military engagements as best they can, deconstruct expectations and generalizations, use empathy and active listening, and start being direct. Knowing the nuanced complexity of war and communication, I weave in my own reflections in contribution to the larger conversation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Actions, Good and Bad

Description

This autobiographical project provides a window into the author's life during military and college years. The project contains two components. First, a memoir that encompasses the author's personal experiences in

This autobiographical project provides a window into the author's life during military and college years. The project contains two components. First, a memoir that encompasses the author's personal experiences in the Israeli Defense Forces and later at Arizona State University. The second component is a critical piece that covers the origins of this project, writing influences, thematic tones, and ideas for future compositions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05