Matching Items (7)

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Millennial Men vs. Modern American Society: A Male Generation of Angst, Disillusionment, and Love

Description

This thesis tackles the questions of what it means to be a Millennial man, and based upon that way of life, how one would best define Millennial masculinity. This thesis

This thesis tackles the questions of what it means to be a Millennial man, and based upon that way of life, how one would best define Millennial masculinity. This thesis is predominantly a creative project, although it is supported by a supplemental critical piece that analyzes the themes/topics and poetics behind the poetry. The thesis encompasses a collection of my original poetry relevant to the state of being a Millennial man. This manifestation of Millennial masculinity is observed through the lenses of three distinct themes in my poetry. The first theme is fiscal instability, relating to inheriting a bad economy after the Great Recession of 2008. This economic downturn caused many Millennial men to become too fiscally unstable to live autonomously, pursue their passions (careers they love), or comfortably date the partners they desire. The second theme relates to ambiguous dating and relationship norms that challenge Millennial men's ability and desire to date or commit to a partner. The third theme is in regards to Millennial men being seen by society as either stereotypically macho or overly effeminate. Frequently used poetics in this poetry include repetition and indentation. Both poetic techniques are used to create emphasis in the writing as well as to provide the reader with a deeper comprehension of the poems and their significance to the entire poetry collection. The ultimate goal of both the poetry and the analysis in this creative project is to help people better understand Millennial men, and to help Millennial men better understand and be true to themselves.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The Great Divide: Gender Inequality Stereotyping in the Business and Construction Fields

Description

This study aims to identify the presence and impact of gender stereotypes for the business and construction industries and how women are hindered by these stereotypes. Through a two part

This study aims to identify the presence and impact of gender stereotypes for the business and construction industries and how women are hindered by these stereotypes. Through a two part study including a survey and one-on-one interviews with male and female participants, qualitative and quantitative data was collected to identify trends in stereotypes. The analysis identified the existence of gender stereotypes in four general categories: Education, Occupational Advancement, Work-Life Balance, and Glass Ceiling. In the subsequent passages, testimonials from study participants and additional research elaborate on how these categories of gender stereotypes impact women at specific companies and women in the business and construction industries as a whole. These testimonials allowed us to form conclusions on gender stereotyping in business and construction revealing the overall impact of many "unwritten" blockades against women's occupational success including the Glass Ceiling, Good Ol' Boys Club, and "Think Manager \u2014 Think Male". Although many of these stereotypes have impacted the business and construction industries for decades, many individuals currently in the workforce believe the new entrants into the workforce, the Millennial Generation, will likely cause gender stereotypes in the workforce to diminish.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Exploring Gendered Experiences of Undergraduate STEM Majors at Arizona State University

Description

Despite increased awareness and gender diversity initiatives, disciplines relating to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) remain largely male dominant. Using Acker's Theory of Gendered Organizations (1990) and Cooley's theory

Despite increased awareness and gender diversity initiatives, disciplines relating to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) remain largely male dominant. Using Acker's Theory of Gendered Organizations (1990) and Cooley's theory of the Looking Glass Self (1902) as a theoretical model, this study uses qualitative and quantitative methods to explore the gendered experiences of undergraduate STEM majors at Arizona State University. This research uses students' perceptions of their peers, professors, and teaching assistants in relationship to (1) the degree to which a student feels they are encouraged (2) the degree to which a student feels they are included and (3) the degree to which a student feels others have confidence in their academic abilities. This study concludes that both men and women feel more encouraged by their female peers. In addition, women feel their fellow female peers have significantly more confidence in their academic abilities, whereas men feel their peers are confident in their academic abilities regardless of gender. These findings address the stigmas still present in STEM disciplines and emphasize changes to make to weaken gender stereotypes that contribute to the lack of diversification in STEM fields.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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How Men and Women Campaign for State Supreme Court Elections: The Impact of Gender Stereotypes

Description

Even at the start of the twenty-first century, gender stereotypes continue to guide how people perceive men and women. Given the power of gender stereotypes, I expect that these stereotypes

Even at the start of the twenty-first century, gender stereotypes continue to guide how people perceive men and women. Given the power of gender stereotypes, I expect that these stereotypes will constrain how women campaign for positions on state supreme courts. In particular, I expect that women candidates for state supreme court will try to revise potentially damaging stereotypes by detailing their possession of agentic traits, while men candidates for state supreme court will have more flexibility when describing their possession of particular traits. When discussing issues in their campaigns, I expect women to highlight issues that correspond to their stereotypical strengths (i.e., communal issues) since by stressing these issues, the candidates hope to prime issues that may benefit their candidacies. In contrast, I expect male candidates for state supreme court to be less constrained by persisting stereotypes and be equally likely to emphasize communal or competitive issues in their campaigns. To test my expectations, I conduct a content analysis of judicial campaign advertisements among the states holding elections for state supreme court. The evidence I find from my analysis strongly supports my hypothesis. This suggests that women are still confined by gender stereotypes when it comes to campaigning in judicial elections.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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The Differences in Language Use Between Men and Women on Twitter and the Potential Applications towards Social Media Marketing Campaigns

Description

The goal of this thesis research was to figure out if there were tangible differences between the way men and women speak on Twitter, a micro blogging social media site,

The goal of this thesis research was to figure out if there were tangible differences between the way men and women speak on Twitter, a micro blogging social media site, and to see if there ways to apply it to strategizing marketing campaigns. AntConc, a free concordance software by Lawrence Anthony, was used to help organize and analyze a corpus created from the Tweets that were collected form the public accounts of twelve different popular public figures. These individuals were chosen based on their profession or the industry that they are associated with, as well as their general popularity. The research focused on three main industries or professions that can be viewed as ‘gendered;’ which were ‘Modeling,’ ‘Fashion Publications,’ and ‘Sports.’ The data was then analyzed across five different main categories which included, ‘Additional Media,’ ‘Adjective Usage,’ ‘How are they talking?,’ ‘Who are they talking about?, and ‘What are they talking about?’ The primary data, along with secondary research was used to see if they words and language use of men and women aligned with stereotypical patterns or if there were patterns that were unique and overlooked.

What was found was that although gender did play a large part in the way men and women spoke, there were more similarities when comparing individuals of the same industry or profession, than there were if they were simply analyzed just based on gender. Additionally, there were many factors that made it difficult to say whether these were qualified patterns or simply tendencies. More research into this would be able to help marketing companies and individuals, better target the audience they want for social media campaigns, by taking into account the importance in contemporary differences in language use by men and women. However, this research would have to be done on data from sites like Twitter to provide an accurate depiction of the way men and women, on these very unique mediums, speak.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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How Gender Stereotypes Influence the Impact of State Supreme Court Advertisements

Description

I examine how gender stereotypes influence the campaign advertisements utilized by candidates for state supreme court and how these gender stereotypes influence how voters react to these advertisements. Gender stereotypes

I examine how gender stereotypes influence the campaign advertisements utilized by candidates for state supreme court and how these gender stereotypes influence how voters react to these advertisements. Gender stereotypes have been found to have a profound impact in races for other offices (e.g., legislative, executive), but there is a lack of research on the role of gender stereotypes in state court elections. In my present research, I first conduct a content analysis of state supreme court advertisements over the course of four election years, looking specifically at how the candidates describe themselves in their advertisements. Based on these findings, I create advertisement scripts where I vary the gender of the candidate and the type of message employed by the candidate in order to test how the gender of the candidate and the content of the messages influences voter impressions of judicial candidates. In a second experiment, I create video advertisements based on these scripts and test how the video advertisements, as well as the candidate’s gender, affect impressions of these candidates. My analyses indicate that not only gender stereotypes play a role in the way judicial candidates create their advertisements, but they also impact the way voters form opinions about candidates running in judicial races.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Growth mindset training to increase women's self-efficacy in science and engineering: a randomized-controlled trial

Description

Undeclared undergraduates participated in an experimental study designed to explore the impact of an Internet-delivered "growth mindset" training on indicators of women's engagement in science, engineering, technology, and mathematics ("STEM")

Undeclared undergraduates participated in an experimental study designed to explore the impact of an Internet-delivered "growth mindset" training on indicators of women's engagement in science, engineering, technology, and mathematics ("STEM") disciplines. This intervention was hypothesized to increase STEM self-efficacy and intentions to pursue STEM by strengthening beliefs in intelligence as malleable ("IQ attitude") and discrediting gender-math stereotypes (strengthening "stereotype disbelief"). Hypothesized relationships between these outcome variables were specified in a path model. The intervention was also hypothesized to bolster academic achievement. Participants consisted of 298 women and 191 men, the majority of whom were self-identified as White (62%) and 18 years old (85%) at the time of the study. Comparison group participants received training on persuasive writing styles and control group participants received no training. Participants were randomly assigned to treatment, comparison, or control groups. At posttest, treatment group scores on measures of IQ attitude, stereotype disbelief, and academic achievement were highest; the effects of group condition on these three outcomes were statistically significant as assessed by analysis of variance. Results of pairwise comparisons indicated that treatment group IQ attitude scores were significantly higher than the average IQ attitude scores of both comparison and control groups. Treatment group scores on stereotype disbelief were significantly higher than those of the comparison group but not those of the control group. GPAs of treatment group participants were significantly higher than those of control group participants but not those of comparison group participants. The effects of group condition on STEM self-efficacy or intentions to pursue STEM were not significant. Results of path analysis indicated that the hypothesized model of the relationships between variables fit to an acceptable degree. However, a model with gender-specific paths from IQ attitude and stereotype disbelief to STEM self-efficacy was found to be superior to the hypothesized model. IQ attitude and stereotype disbelief were positively related; IQ attitude was positively related to men's STEM self-efficacy; stereotype disbelief was positively related to women's STEM self-efficacy, and STEM self-efficacy was positively related to intentions to pursue STEM. Implications and study limitations are discussed, and directions for future research are proposed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014