Matching Items (8)

135191-Thumbnail Image.png

A Study on the Performance and a Performance of Mozart's Fantasia in D minor K. 397

Description

Musical interpretation is challenging when one's goal is to evoke an emotional response from an audience. In order to develop a well-informed interpretation of Mozart's Fantasia in D minor K.

Musical interpretation is challenging when one's goal is to evoke an emotional response from an audience. In order to develop a well-informed interpretation of Mozart's Fantasia in D minor K. 397, a study was conducted on the historical background of the piece and various performances by well-regarded performers. Fantasias are written works, but improvisatory by nature. Mozart's fantasias were influenced by C. P. E. Bach's, which included sudden changes in emotion. An Emil Gilels performance provided a classically trained approach, while Mitsuko Uchida's performance provided an emotional approach. Colin Tilney and John Irving performances elucidated the sound of the instruments that Mozart would have been composing with. Altogether, the research culminated in an interpretation of the D minor Fantasia that endeavored to capture the essence of fantasy, improvisation and emotion.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

136823-Thumbnail Image.png

SELF-PEDAGOGY OF THE GUITAR USING TABLATURE AND CLASSICAL METHODS

Description

There are many different methods of learning the guitar and teaching it to oneself. I explored classical methods as well as learned by tablature. I compared it to how I

There are many different methods of learning the guitar and teaching it to oneself. I explored classical methods as well as learned by tablature. I compared it to how I have learned the piano and other things in past such as languages and sports. This paper narrates the process but also give advise for someone teaching themself any subject matter. Here are the main points: (1) Choose something you are passionate about (2) Use what you already know, and apply strategies that have worked before (3) Try learning the subject in different ways (4) Build a strong foundation of fundamentals (5) Take advantage of various resources (6) Do not be afraid to make mistakes (7) Perseverance will pay off. I found that I preferred the tablature method but learned a lot from both. I plan on continuing to improve at both methods and want to expand my learning to songwriting.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Modern Music in a Classical Style

Description

A piece of music consisting of a single movement was composed with baroque and classical elements. The piece is written in common time in D minor, and the key, along

A piece of music consisting of a single movement was composed with baroque and classical elements. The piece is written in common time in D minor, and the key, along with the slow tempo, give the piece a somber mood. It is written for a string quartet: violin I, violin II, viola, and cello. The prominence and complexity of each of the four parts is evenly balanced so as not to give the impression that certain parts are more important. The piece is centered around a theme, which each of the parts plays in some form in the piece. This structure was largely inspired by Bach's Art of the Fugue, which introduces a theme (first played unaccompanied and unmodified in Contrapunctus I) and adds different variations in later movements. Like Bach's Art of the Fugue, the theme is passed between the four parts with new modifications in each introduction. After the completion of the theme, the progression was composed without specific inspiration to keep the piece as original as possible. To maintain a baroque style, the parts were composed separately and viewed as independent melodic lines. Ensuring that the lines were harmoniously interdependent was one of the largest challenges in this project. The piece was originally composed by hand on notebook paper, but a majority of the work was done using the professional music writing program Dorico. Dorico was an incredibly useful tool in this process because it easy to learn and allows users to try it free for a month.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

157882-Thumbnail Image.png

Three Facets of Fazil Say in His Selected Piano Compositions

Description

Beginning around the 1820s, the refinement of the piano mechanism increased the expressiveness of the instrument’s sonority and further attracted the composers’ attention and curiosity about the instrument. Concentration on

Beginning around the 1820s, the refinement of the piano mechanism increased the expressiveness of the instrument’s sonority and further attracted the composers’ attention and curiosity about the instrument. Concentration on piano music became a trend for composers between the mid to late nineteenth century. During this period, the massive output of music for piano and extremely developed keyboard techniques resulted in classical composers searching for fresh ideas. Starting in the twentieth century, composers became increasingly interested in music outside the classical world and new interpretations of meter, harmony, and form. As early as the 1910s, composers included tone clusters generated at keyboard and soon afterwards, began “playing” the internal components of the piano including strings. Concurrently, they blended different styles within a piece according to their cultural and educational background. A prime example of this compositional trend is the classically-trained Turkish pianist-composer Fazil Say (b. 1970). His ability as a pianist reflects his strong classical training as well as a stylistic freedom partly derived from jazz. Say’s inspiration is also drawn from his Turkish heritage, as traditional folk elements have helped to shape his compositions. Representing Say’s education, passion, and ethnic background, the three elements of classical, jazz, and folk music have become his primary devices within his solo piano compositions.

This brief investigation of Say’s life to date and his piano works offers an insight into the correlation between the multi-cultural environments in which he has lived and the formation of his styles. Chapter one, the summary of his life and educational background, illustrates the fact that the three facets within his piano compositions are strongly rooted in his exposure to different environments. The second chapter presents a clear overview of the development of Say’s compositional idiom and a deeper look at selected piano compositions: his transcription of J. S. Bach’s Passacaglia in C Minor, BWV 582, Three Ballads, Black Earth, Alla Turca Jazz, and Paganini Jazz. The goal is to provide current and future pianists with insight into the expressive performance of one composer’s extremely successful hybridization of classical, jazz, and Turkish folk music.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

155299-Thumbnail Image.png

Eliminating Fear and Unleashing Creativity: Incorporating Improvisation into Performance Practice and Education

Description

This research project was written simultaneously with a composition for double

bass and piano that centers around improvisational concepts. The composition is intended for intermediate to advanced musicians to have an

This research project was written simultaneously with a composition for double

bass and piano that centers around improvisational concepts. The composition is intended for intermediate to advanced musicians to have an opportunity to practice improvisational performance and, hopefully, further their understanding and improve their ability to make convincing and creative musical decisions.

Improvisation, an aspect of music that has a deep tradition in Western Classical music, is often feared by classical musicians. The lack of improvisation in classical music, the idea that it is a specialized skill, and the lack of encouragement from studio teachers contributes greatly to this fear. In addition, teachers themselves often fear teaching and utilizing improvisation in performance for these same reasons. The introduction of improvisation into both the student’s and the teacher’s studies and daily practice can be beneficial in the development of meaningful performance and understanding music theory concepts.

This paper will introduce improvisation into daily practice that will educate both the student and the teacher and cement the understanding of theoretical concepts and standard repertoire. Various improvisation games (creating new material and improvising from traditional classical music) will be introduced. This study will begin with a brief survey of the tradition of improvisation in Western classical music from the Middle Ages to the present.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

152290-Thumbnail Image.png

Concerto for Piano and Chamber Orchestra

Description

Concerto for Piano and Chamber Orchestra was conceived in February of 2013, and conceptually it is my attempt to fuse personal expressions of jazz and classical music into one fully

Concerto for Piano and Chamber Orchestra was conceived in February of 2013, and conceptually it is my attempt to fuse personal expressions of jazz and classical music into one fully realized statement. It is a three movement work (fast, slow, fast) for 2 fl., 2 ob., 2 cl., bsn., 2 hrn., 2 tpt., tbn., pno., perc., str. (6,4,2,2,1). The work is approximately 27 minutes in duration. The first movement of the Concerto is written in a fluid sonata form. A fugato begins where the second theme would normally appear, and the second theme does not fully appear until near the end of the solo piano section. The result is that the second theme when finally revealed is so reminiscent of the history of jazz and classical synthesis that it does not sound completely new, and in fact is a return of something that was heard before, but only hinted at in this piece. The second movement is a kind of deconstructive set of variations, with a specific theme and harmonic pattern implied throughout the movement. However, the full theme is not disclosed until the final variation. The variations are interrupted by moments of pure rhythmic music, containing harmony made up of major chords with an added fourth, defying resolution, and dissolving each time back into a new variation. The third movement is in rondo form, using rhythmic and harmonic influences from jazz. The percussion plays a substantial role in this movement, acting as a counterpoint to the piano part throughout. This movement and the piece concludes with an extended coda, inspired indirectly by the simple complexities of an improvisational piano solo, building in complexity as the concerto draws to a close.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

150685-Thumbnail Image.png

Tony Baker & Alex Iles: interviews with two trombonists who excel as performers and soloists in classical and Jazz settings

Description

The ability of musicians to perform well in multiple musical styles is increasingly common and necessary. This paper profiles two trombonists who have gone well beyond the ability to function

The ability of musicians to perform well in multiple musical styles is increasingly common and necessary. This paper profiles two trombonists who have gone well beyond the ability to function in multiple genres, and are instead considered significant artists. Tony Baker and Alex Iles were chosen to be profiled for this project because both have achieved recognition as solo artists in the genres of classical music and jazz and have performed on international stages as soloists. They also have significant ensemble experience in both classical and jazz settings and are active teachers as well. Both hold-high profile positions that have helped grow their reputations as performers: Mr. Baker as a professor at one of the largest music schools in the United States, the University of North Texas, and Mr. Iles as a highly in-demand freelance musician in Los Angeles. This paper presents interviews with both trombonists that investigate their development as musicians and soloists in both classical music and jazz. They are asked to describe the benefits and challenges of performing at a high level in both styles, and how these have affected their musical voices. Common traits found in their responses are examined, and recommendations are created for musicians seeking stylistic versatility.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

149612-Thumbnail Image.png

Two newly-discovered pieces for soprano, trumpet, strings and continuo by Neapolitan eighteenth century composers Domenico Sarro and Gennaro Manna: performance editions

Description

The combination of soprano, trumpet, strings and continuo was used with much frequency by Baroque composers in their cantatas, oratorios and operas of the time, giving the trumpet a very

The combination of soprano, trumpet, strings and continuo was used with much frequency by Baroque composers in their cantatas, oratorios and operas of the time, giving the trumpet a very important place as a solo instrument from 1600 to 1750. The discovery of two pieces by Neapolitan Baroque composers Domenico Sarro (1679-1744) and Gennaro Manna (1715-1779) enlarges the already important body of known works for this instrumentation. Presenting them in performance editions is a valuable contribution to this repertory. Making performance editions available to performers is always an important and exciting task, especially if they exhibit features that have rarely been seen in this combination of instruments and voices. This is specifically the case with Manna's Tuba Sonora Exclama, which shows many interesting features of the Early Classical style. Both works were discovered by the author in a digital archive sponsored by the Ministry of Heritage and Culture for the Italian Government. The original copies of these works are held at two Neapolitan libraries: Biblioteca Statale Oratoriana del Monumento Nazionale del Girolamini (Manna's piece), and Biblioteca del Conservatorio di musica San Pietro a Majella (Sarro's Per abbattere il mio core, from his opera Partenope.) The manuscripts, obtained in digital format, are well preserved and easy to understand. Along with the scores prepared for this document, some historical background about each composer, a discussion of the use of the trumpet as a solo instrument in arias with voice, and descriptions of the pieces are presented. Other important information, such as editorial procedures and critical notes, is also given.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011