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Utilization of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Detection of QSOX1 and CEA

Description

Improved pancreatic cancer diagnostic technology has the potential to improve patient prognosis by increasing cancer screening rates and encouraging early detection of the cancer. To increase the sensitivity and specificity while decreasing the cost and time investment, the emerging detection

Improved pancreatic cancer diagnostic technology has the potential to improve patient prognosis by increasing cancer screening rates and encouraging early detection of the cancer. To increase the sensitivity and specificity while decreasing the cost and time investment, the emerging detection method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was tested to detect two pancreatic cancer specific biomarkers. The antibodies of carcinoembryonic antigen and quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 were immobilized individually to gold disk electrodes and tested for binding to their respective antigens. An AC signal of varying potential and a wide frequency sweep was applied to the electrode system and the resulting imaginary impedance values were analyzed. Based off of the highest slope and R-squared values of the collected impedance values, the optimal binding frequencies of QSOX1 and CEA with their antibodies was determined to be 97.66 Hz and 17.44 Hz, respectively. EIS was also used to test for potential multimarker detection by coimmobilizing anti-CEA and anti-QSOX1 to the surface of gold disk electrodes. Each system's impedance response was correlated to the physiological concentration range of CEA and QSOX1 individually. The resulting impedance and concentration calibration curves had R-squared values of 0.78 and 0.79 for the calculated QSOX1 and CEA, respectively. Both markers showed similar trends between the calculated and actual calibration curves for each marker. The imaginary impedance output lacks two independent peaks for the distinct optimal binding frequencies of both biomarkers after signal subtraction and show a large shift in optimal frequencies. From analyzing the co-immobilization data for the calculated and experimentally determined calibration curves of CEA and QSOX1, both curves had different correlation values between imaginary impedance values and concentration. Add and subtracting the experimental and calculated co-immobilization, QSOX1, and CEA signals suggest an oversaturation of QSOX1 used during the experiments.

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Date Created
2017-05

CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Mutation in the ATP-ase Domain of XPB to Study its Role in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

Description

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a form of pancreatic cancer that affects the exocrine function of the pancreas. PDAC is often hard to diagnose and has shown to also be as difficult to treat. Xeroderma pigmentosum type B (XPB), is

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a form of pancreatic cancer that affects the exocrine function of the pancreas. PDAC is often hard to diagnose and has shown to also be as difficult to treat. Xeroderma pigmentosum type B (XPB), is a protein can be found in Transcription Factor II Human (TFIIH). It is known to have ATP-ase and helicase activities. The ATP-ase activities could be used to regulate the transcription within super enhancer (SE) networks. Knocking out the ATP-ase activity in XPB in the same way that triptolide does would offer a more individualized therapeutic regiment. A loss of function mutation was tested to identify whether or not the mutation was present within the strand of DNA. In order to explore the role of XPB in pancreatic cancer, a knockout clone was made through the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology to induce a clone in exon 2 of XPB using a plasmid with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) selection marker. Once the clones were successfully made, they underwent testing through the use of a Surveyor Mutation Detection Kit for standard electrophoresis. The confirmation of a functional clone lead to GFP, which contained the mutation, being chosen for further testing be compared to the wild type GFP. After the GFP D54H mutation was chosen for further testing, it was then cultured from bacteria and wild type GFP and GFP D54H underwent a restriction enzyme digest. The digest resulted in showing that GFP and GFP D54H were the same on a larger level, and that one of the only ways to prove that the mutation was present was through amplification and analysis using the mutation detection kit.

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2017-05