Matching Items (12)

Biomedical Engineering Workforce Competencies for 21st Century Healthcare Technology Product Development Teams: A BME Student Cohort Perspective

Description

The importance of efficient design and development teams in in 21st century is evident after the compressive literate review was performed to digest various aspects of benefits and foundation of

The importance of efficient design and development teams in in 21st century is evident after the compressive literate review was performed to digest various aspects of benefits and foundation of teamwork. Although teamwork may have variety of applications in many different industries, the new emerging biomedical engineering is growing significantly using principles of teamwork. Studying attributes and mechanism of creating successful biomedical engineering teams may even contribute more to the fast paste growth of this industry. In comprehensive literate review performed, general importance of teamwork was studied. Also specific hard and soft attributes which may contribute to teamwork was studied. Currently, there are number of general assessment tools which assists managements in industry and academia to systematically bring qualified people together to flourish their talents and skills as members of a biomedical engineering teams. These assessment tools, although are useful, but are not comprehensive, incorporating literature review attributes, and also doesn't not contain student perspective who have experience as being part of a design and development team. Although there are many scientific researches and papers designated to this matter, but there is no study which purposefully studies development of an assessment tool which is designated to biomedical engineering workforce and is constructed of both literature, current assessment tools, and also student perspective. It is hypothesized that a more comprehensive composite assessment tool that incorporate both soft and hard team attributes from a combined professional and student perspective could be implemented in the development of successful Biomedical Engineering Design and Development teams and subsequently used in 21st century workforce.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Analysis of Keirsey Composition, Behavioral Types, and Familiarity, and their Impact on Satisfaction, Performance, and Creativity of Groups

Description

Research on teamwork has shown that teams are more productive and produce better results than individuals working on their own. Yet, research on individuals' work preferences makes it clear that

Research on teamwork has shown that teams are more productive and produce better results than individuals working on their own. Yet, research on individuals' work preferences makes it clear that not everyone prefers working in teams. In order to improve teamwork and achieve better results in both the collegiate arena and in the professional world, this study was designed to research different factors that affect a group's performance and creativity: satisfaction, familiarity, and the behavioral styles of individual team members. Additionally, this study addresses if the group's composition of Keirsey types \u2014 temperament patterns \u2014 also play a role in the group's creativity and performance. In this study, students created teams of four to seven students and completed specific in-class activities called Applied Insights. Groups composed mostly of Guardians, one of the four Keirsey temperaments, are able to adapt to the task at hand, which is demonstrated here with creativity. Further, groups who perceive themselves as sharing similar traits with many members are more satisfied and achieve a higher overall performance. Lastly, groups comprised of individuals who were least familiar with their teammates they had not previously worked with, produced more creative results in the short run. Whereas groups comprised of individuals who were least familiar with their teammates they had previously worked with, produced better overall results in short run.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Escape Rooms: Learning by Doing

Description

The experiences of 14 groups of 2-8 players in a local escape room were observed through the lens of small-group teamwork and goal-based communication. Their interactions were used to explore

The experiences of 14 groups of 2-8 players in a local escape room were observed through the lens of small-group teamwork and goal-based communication. Their interactions were used to explore how escape rooms could be used as a tool to improve the retention of knowledge using experiential learning and to develop substantial interpersonal relationships between teams of strangers. These observations were used to develop an ASU-themed escape room for educating prospective students about ASU's culture and campus with a focus on total inclusion and enthusiastic participation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Dodgeball: Future Olympic Sport or Schoolyard Nightmare

Description

It's the last Friday before break, everyone is excited and rush to put on their uniform. The class eagerly lines up for morning stretches and the P.E. Instructor announces, "Today

It's the last Friday before break, everyone is excited and rush to put on their uniform. The class eagerly lines up for morning stretches and the P.E. Instructor announces, "Today we're playing... DODGEBALL!" Half the class cheers eyeing their friends with a competitive smirk, while the other half tremble in their sneakers mentally reliving their last terrifying red rubber ball experience. Dodgeball's polarizing popularity has created an uproar in the public-school system with many claiming that the traditional sport is beneficial while others assert it's dangerous and lobby for its prohibition citing recent damages and lawsuits. Dodgeball is a sport that far most often elicits vivid memories of gym class; however, there is a rich and active history of competitive dodgeball worldwide. Dodgeball's resurgence since the popular film of the same name in 2004 has sparked a competitive flair for the game and quickly gained the attention of sports media which has highlighted the team-focused competitive aspect of the beloved sport. The sport of dodgeball was originally developed in Africa over 200 years ago and first observed by a missionary named Dr. James Carlisle (History of Dodgeball)1. The concept of the sport was exceptionally crude, as the African tribes used large rocks and putrefied matter to continuously pelt the opposing players. The defending team would gather around their downed player to deflect projectiles and allow their teammate to recover. Dr. Carlisle recognized that the tribesmen used the sport as a means to build trust and demonstrated remarkable athleticism amongst their warriors. Dr. Carlisle introduced this innovative team-based sport to his colleagues in England instead utilizing leather balls; however, the doctor quickly recognized that his colleagues didn't possess the necessary strength, agility, nor teamwork to compete in the game at its current state. The sport was updated and played on an open field with no set area restrictions. The game was similar to a large-scale chess match in which opposing teams aim to strategically trap and aggressively target players in order to remove them from play. The sport was played this way for a century until in 1884 when Phillip Ferguson from Yale University brought the competition to America with a new set of guidelines. The reformed sport included a definite number of players, dodgeballs, and predetermined space for the competition leading to widespread adoption by the American school system. Today, dodgeball has emerged as a competitive sport with multiple regional competitive leagues around the country and even two distinct professional dodgeball leagues in which teams can earn prize money, sponsorships, and for elite teams, world championship glory. Dodgeball is often recognized as a popular activity in the public school physical education system and has been a cornerstone of the course exemplifying sportsmanship, leadership, and athletic skills through coordinated team play since inception; however, in recent years, the sport has come into scrutiny as lawsuits resulting from damages and concerned parents voice against the activity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Beyond Business: Life and Leadership Secrets From A Young Entrepreneur

Description

A fun, interactive, and practical motivational speaking package designed to inspire and encourage high school and college students, as well as young adults, to achieve success and discover their leadershi

A fun, interactive, and practical motivational speaking package designed to inspire and encourage high school and college students, as well as young adults, to achieve success and discover their leadership potential. Using secrets learned from starting my own business, Board Blazers LED Underglow Skateboard Lighting, and performing as Drum Major of the 400+ member ASU Sun Devil Marching Band, I share tips and tricks that can be applied in everyday life. Topics include surviving in difficult leadership situations unique to young leaders, celebrity confidence secrets, and creating infectious enthusiasm while working on a team.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Communication Networks and Team Workload in a Command and Control Synthetic Task Environment

Description

Despite the prevalence of teams in complex sociotechnical systems, current approaches to understanding workload tend to focus on the individual operator. However, research suggests that team workload has emergent properties

Despite the prevalence of teams in complex sociotechnical systems, current approaches to understanding workload tend to focus on the individual operator. However, research suggests that team workload has emergent properties and is not necessarily equivalent to the aggregate of individual workload. Assessment of communications provides a means of examining aspects of team workload in highly interdependent teams. This thesis set out to explore how communications are associated with team workload and performance under high task demand in all-human and human–autonomy teams in a command and control task. A social network analysis approach was used to analyze the communications of 30 different teams, each with three members operating in a command and control task environment of over a series of five missions. Teams were assigned to conditions differentiated by their composition with either a naïve participant, a trained confederate, or a synthetic agent in the pilot role. Social network analysis measures of centralization and intensity were used to assess differences in communications between team types and under different levels of demand, and relationships between communication measures, performance, and workload distributions were also examined. Results indicated that indegree centralization was greater in the all-human control teams than in the other team types, but degree centrality standard deviation and intensity were greatest in teams with a highly trained experimenter pilot. In all three team types, the intensity of communications and degree centrality standard deviation appeared to decrease during the high demand mission, but indegree and outdegree centralization did not. Higher communication intensity was associated with more efficient target processing and more successful target photos per mission, but a clear relationship between measures of performance and decentralization of communications was not found.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Harnessing Emotions: The Impact of Developing Ability Emotional Intelligence Skills on Perceptions of Collaborative Teamwork in a Project-Based Learning Class

Description

The purpose of this action research study was to implement and analyze an intervention designed to improve perceptions of working with others as well as practice and improve emotional tools

The purpose of this action research study was to implement and analyze an intervention designed to improve perceptions of working with others as well as practice and improve emotional tools related to such interactions through the systematic development of ability emotional intelligence (EI) related skills. The present study sought to: (1) explore high school students’ perceptions of their role as part of a team during teamwork; (1a) investigate how perceptions differed by EI level; (2) examine how students’ perceptions of their role in teamwork were influenced by being paired with more advanced (ability EI) peers or less advanced peers, based on ability emotional intelligence test scores; (3) determine if ability emotional intelligence related skills could be developed over the course of a 7-week intervention.

The intervention took place in a 12th grade US Government & Economics classroom with 34 participants for examination of general trends, and 11 focal participants for focused and in-depth analysis. Students were taught about emotion theory and engaged in two weeks of ability emotional intelligence skills training, followed by a five-week project cycle in which students were required to work together to achieve a common goal. The research design was mixed methods convergent parallel. Quantitative data were collected from post- and retrospective pre-intervention surveys regarding student perceptions about working with others and their ability EI related skills. Qualitative data were collected through on-going student reflective journal entries, observational field notes, and interviews with the focal group of participants.

Results suggested the intervention had a significant effect on students’ perceptions of working with others and perceived ability emotional intelligence related skills. Significant positive change was found through quantitative data analysis, revealing students’ perceptions about working with others in teams had improved as a result of the intervention as had their perceptions about their ability EI related skills. Qualitative analysis revealed rich, thick descriptions exploring this shift in perception among the 11 focal students, providing the evidence necessary to support the effectiveness of the intervention. Results suggested the possibilities for improved teamwork in the classroom.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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The role of teamwork in predicting movie earnings

Description

Intelligence analysts’ work has become progressively complex due to increasing security threats and data availability. In order to study “big” data exploration within the intelligence domain the intelligence analyst

Intelligence analysts’ work has become progressively complex due to increasing security threats and data availability. In order to study “big” data exploration within the intelligence domain the intelligence analyst task was abstracted and replicated in a laboratory (controlled environment). Participants used a computer interface and movie database to determine the opening weekend gross movie earnings of three pre-selected movies. Data consisted of Twitter tweets and predictive models. These data were displayed in various formats such as graphs, charts, and text. Participants used these data to make their predictions. It was expected that teams (a team is a group with members who have different specialties and who work interdependently) would outperform individuals and groups. That is, teams would be significantly better at predicting “Opening Weekend Gross” than individuals or groups. Results indicated that teams outperformed individuals and groups in the first prediction, under performed in the second prediction, and performed better than individuals in the third prediction (but not better than groups). Insights and future directions are discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Communication between teammates in urban search and rescue

Description

Although current urban search and rescue (USAR) robots are little more than remotely controlled cameras, the end goal is for them to work alongside humans as trusted teammates. Natural language

Although current urban search and rescue (USAR) robots are little more than remotely controlled cameras, the end goal is for them to work alongside humans as trusted teammates. Natural language communications and performance data are collected as a team of humans works to carry out a simulated search and rescue task in an uncertain virtual environment. Conditions are tested emulating a remotely controlled robot versus an intelligent one. Differences in performance, situation awareness, trust, workload, and communications are measured. The Intelligent robot condition resulted in higher levels of performance and operator situation awareness (SA).

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Training the Code Team Leader as a Forcing Function to Improve Overall Team Performance During Simulated Code Blue Events

Description

The American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that there are approximately 200,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) annually with low rates of survival to discharge at about 22%. Training programs for cardiac

The American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that there are approximately 200,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) annually with low rates of survival to discharge at about 22%. Training programs for cardiac arrest teams, also termed code teams, have been recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and in the AHA's consensus statement to help improve these dismal survival rates. Historically, training programs in the medical field are procedural in nature and done at the individual level, despite the fact that healthcare providers frequently work in teams. The rigidity of procedural training can cause habituation and lead to poor team performance if the situation does not match the original training circumstances. Despite the need for team training, factors such as logistics, time, personnel coordination, and financial constraints often hinder resuscitation team training. This research was a three-step process of: 1) development of a metric specific for the evaluation of code team performance, 2) development of a communication model that targeted communication and leadership during a code blue resuscitation, and 3) training and evaluation of the code team leader using the communication model. This research forms a basis to accomplish a broad vision of improving outcomes of IHCA events by applying conceptual and methodological strategies learned from collaborative and inter-disciplinary science of teams.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017