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Analysis of Mesa Urban Garden's Impact on Their Community

Description

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize their grounds. The gardens may also have a positive impact

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize their grounds. The gardens may also have a positive impact on the local environment and wider community. This study examines a community garden seeking to expand its involvement in the local neighborhood and searching for ways to include local residents in garden related activities. To this end, the garden was waiting for approval on their non-profit, 501(c)3 status, and was seeking additional data on local residents and perceptions of the garden's activities. This thesis first reviews the literature on the benefits community gardens provide for the individuals living in their communities and their impact on urban development. The thesis then turns to an analysis of one garden, Mesa Urban Garden, rooted in the Downtown District of Mesa, Arizona, and how they are impacting their neighborhood and how garden organizers can respond in new and creative ways to local residents.

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Date Created
2014-05

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Analysis of Mesa Urban Garden's Impact on Their Community

Description

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize their grounds. The gardens may also have a positive impact

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize their grounds. The gardens may also have a positive impact on the local environment and wider community. This study examines a community garden seeking to expand its involvement in the local neighborhood and searching for ways to include local residents in garden related activities. To this end, the garden was waiting for approval on their non-profit, 501(c)3 status, and was seeking additional data on local residents and perceptions of the garden's activities. This thesis first reviews the literature on the benefits community gardens provide for the individuals living in their communities and their impact on urban development. The thesis then turns to an analysis of one garden, Mesa Urban Garden, rooted in the Downtown District of Mesa, Arizona, and how they are impacting their neighborhood and how garden organizers can respond in new and creative ways to local residents.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

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From Startup to Sustainable: Establishing a Campus Microfinance Institution

Description

Arizona Microcredit Initiative (AMI) is a student-run nonprofit organization that empowers passionate men and women to start their own companies. Through this project, AMI will continue to fulfill its mission by establishing organizational processes that staff members can reference while

Arizona Microcredit Initiative (AMI) is a student-run nonprofit organization that empowers passionate men and women to start their own companies. Through this project, AMI will continue to fulfill its mission by establishing organizational processes that staff members can reference while making strategic decisions in the future. This project provides detailed information regarding AMI's Founding and History, along with current operations. This information being available to AMI members will allow the team to continue to empower themselves, AMI clients, and the organization as a whole to grow and make a larger impact in the Greater Phoenix community.

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Date Created
2014-05

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Divine Providence Can Provide, Will Provide, Did Provide: An Examination of Emotional Labor in a Non-Profit Organization

Description

This study examines the nature of emotion work in a nonprofit organization through qualitative inquiry. The mission of the organization is to provide houses of hospitality and ongoing support to help pregnant and parenting women in need reach their goals,

This study examines the nature of emotion work in a nonprofit organization through qualitative inquiry. The mission of the organization is to provide houses of hospitality and ongoing support to help pregnant and parenting women in need reach their goals, and welcomes them into a community filled with love and dignity. Field observations and participant interviews were analyzed alongside organizational documents to determine if participants were experiencing emotional labor and the ways in which they are compensated for this labor. By extending the concepts of emotional labor to jobs and volunteer positions that do not receive significant financial compensation, the findings suggest that emotional labor is not always performed for a wage. Further, volunteers of nonprofit organizations may find compensation through the fulfillment of personal motivations, unrelated to financial gain.

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Date Created
2015-05

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The Roots of Forgiveness Communication in Relation to Families

Description

Building on research on family communication and forgiveness, this study seeks to understand how families communicate the value and practice of forgiveness. Through semi-structured interviews, the study asks participants to recall their formative conversations and experiences about forgiveness with their

Building on research on family communication and forgiveness, this study seeks to understand how families communicate the value and practice of forgiveness. Through semi-structured interviews, the study asks participants to recall their formative conversations and experiences about forgiveness with their family members and to discuss how those conversations influenced their current perspectives on forgiveness. Interviews from five female undergraduate students yielded seven main themes from where individuals learn how to forgive: 1) Sibling conflicts, 2) Family conversations about friendship conflicts, 3) Conversations with Mom, 4) Living by example, 5) Take the high road, 6) “Life’s too short”, and 7) Messages rooted in faith and morality.

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Date Created
2021-05