Matching Items (38)

AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad Public Relations Campaign

Description

Dance studios often have a high tuition rates, which makes learning technique from a dance school difficult to attain. For AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad no circumstance can keep them

Dance studios often have a high tuition rates, which makes learning technique from a dance school difficult to attain. For AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad no circumstance can keep them from dancing. This 14-year-old team has made their mark in dance competitions nationwide. The only problem is: this nationally ranked team lingers unrecognized. AZ Hype is a non-profit dance team that practices wherever they can find a space. They practice anywhere from school cafeterias to driveways, parks to backyards and parking lots. What gives this team their competitive edge is that nothing keeps them from dancing and they draw inspiration from outside of the walls of a studio. The team consists of 18 to 30 dancers each year and is divided into two age groups; a junior and senior team. The dancers range from six to 25 years of age. The team has one coach, one stereo and a room full of trophies and championship banners. The coach, Tara Delgado, is a 5th grade history teacher who has been coaching AZ Hype for 14 consecutive years. She continues to teach and inspire kids in the Valley. Though years go by her personal dance skills and creativity to choreograph and mix music strengthens and improves. She is more than just a dance coach to the kids who make her house their home. A public relations campaign for AZ Hype Hip Hop Squad was created to benefit the team in many ways. For the duration of the team's existence, they did not have a website, social media management, community support, sponsors, practice space, or any news media connections. The goal of the campaign is to gain exposure but also gather sponsors to lift the burdening costs of competitions, uniforms and practice spaces. The plan would serve as an outline to utilize social media, reach out to local media and contact various dance and youth supporters. In this campaign, testimonials have been gathered to uncover the true need and impact of the dance team. Without schools teaching dance or other performing arts, many youths lose out on the opportunity to ever learn. In addition to research, collateral material will be made and used for marketing and information as well as a strategic fundraising and branding plan. This plan will encourage and help implement the transition from a group of dancers to a 501c(3) nonprofit.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Non-Profit Project Evaluation: Kabanana Community School

Description

It is essential for nonprofit organizations to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of their programs on their target communities to demonstrate their value and progress to current and prospective stakeholders.

It is essential for nonprofit organizations to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of their programs on their target communities to demonstrate their value and progress to current and prospective stakeholders. Unfortunately, due to finite resources, projects developed and conducted by small international non-governmental organizations (INGO's) are unable to conduct regular evaluations. In this study, I will be conducting an evaluation of a community school project completed by an INGO in order to gauge the project's impact in the community. The evaluation includes a review of previously published literature on the subject, as well as survey data that was gathered to gauge the project's impact. The results of this study found not only that the community school students were beating both the district and national average in examination scores, but also that 100% of students in attendance planned on completing some form of higher education. Furthermore, a majority of the enrolled students would not have had access to alternate forms of education without the community school. For these reasons, the project appears to be meeting all of its current objectives. The evaluation produced several strong recommendations for the school's future improvement such as continuous benchmarking and self-evaluation, increased focus on shifting towards self-sustainability, and an overall improvement of its current facilities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Assessing the value of sustainability indicators through the case study of Valley Permaculture Alliance

Description

The ecological benefits provided by trees include improving air quality (Nowak, et. al., 2006), mitigating climate change by sequestering carbon (Nowak, 1993), providing animal habitats (Livingston, et. al., 2003), and

The ecological benefits provided by trees include improving air quality (Nowak, et. al., 2006), mitigating climate change by sequestering carbon (Nowak, 1993), providing animal habitats (Livingston, et. al., 2003), and reducing heat (Edmonson, 2016), among others. Trees also provide numerous social benefits, impacting urban sustainability in particular by improving human health (Salmond, 2016), aesthetically and economically improving neighborhoods (Torres, 2012), and contributing to thriving communities by creating gathering spaces and even reducing crime (Abraham, et. al., 2010). Because of the tremendous potential of trees to provide social and ecological services, particularly in urban areas, tree planting has become an important facet of many sustainability initiatives. This thesis assesses one such initiative aimed at planting trees for the diverse benefits they provide. Valley Permaculture Alliance (VPA), a nonprofit based in Phoenix, Arizona, is known for its Shade Tree Program. The author conducted an internal, quantitative assessment of the program between August and December of 2015. The assessment included evaluation of several indicators of ecological and community health related to the presence of shade trees, culminating in a report released in 2016. This paper evaluates the use of sustainability indicators in the VPA assessment as well as their value in different types of organizations. It culminates with an assessment of VPA's strengths, challenges faced by the organization, and suggestions for its future development.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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A Case Study in Marketing Microfinance in Greater Phoenix: Arizona Microcredit Initiative (AMI)

Description

This thesis examines the marketing efforts of Arizona Microcredit Initiative (AMI), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit run by Arizona State University students. The mission of AMI is to empower and education underserved

This thesis examines the marketing efforts of Arizona Microcredit Initiative (AMI), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit run by Arizona State University students. The mission of AMI is to empower and education underserved entrepreneurs in greater Phoenix through microloans up to $5,000, free consulting and free business education workshops. Included is an analysis of past marketing efforts, research on potential solutions and recommendations for future marketing strategy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Problematic Process Issues in Humanitarian Organizations: A Case Study Examination of the Mental Health Care Sector in Arizona

Description

This research focuses and discusses on the Supply Chain process within the mental health industry and its impact on the center for health empowerment education employment recovery. Our first approach

This research focuses and discusses on the Supply Chain process within the mental health industry and its impact on the center for health empowerment education employment recovery. Our first approach was to research background information on mental health sector. With 115 billion dollars on mental health treatment investment annually nationwide, many citizens continues to struggle to find help. Due to such a complex structure of specific industry, we needed to focus more specifically, Arizona. Even within Arizona, we chose one organization to discuss their complex supply chain logistic issues. Through analysis of beneficiaries, technology system, finance management, employer, many educational programs, we were able to identify possible improvements. Through utilizing Supply Chain concepts, my co-author and I came up with few solutions that can greatly benefit the organization.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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A Collaboration Between Mission of Mercy and the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) Program T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University

Description

Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) partnered with Mission of Mercy, a faith-based nonprofit organization that provides free medical care services to uninsured and underinsured individuals throughout the Phoenix valley. A

Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) partnered with Mission of Mercy, a faith-based nonprofit organization that provides free medical care services to uninsured and underinsured individuals throughout the Phoenix valley. A needs assessment was conducted on Mission of Mercy's patient population and data collected over a two month long period, in which 91 completed surveys were collected. Participants were between the ages of 18 to over 65 and were largely Hispanic/Latino, followed by White/Anglo and Black/African American. The results indicate that there is need for increased patient education which could be satisfied by implement an incentive program. A need for a program specific to high blood pressure was also found. Participants were interested in dental services being offered, a service that is currently not offered through the Arizona chapter of Mission of Mercy. The study also showed that respondents were satisfied with the level of care received at Mission of Mercy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Factors that Contribute Toward Volunteer Satisfaction and Retention Rate of Alas de Amor: A Collaboration Between Alas de Amor and the C.A.R.E. Program

Description

Alas de Amor is a fairly new organization whose most significant need right now is to grow in numbers and remain growing. This growth is important to the organization because

Alas de Amor is a fairly new organization whose most significant need right now is to grow in numbers and remain growing. This growth is important to the organization because it will allow them to not only treat and see more patients while in Mexico, but it will also benefit the organization in terms of presence in the Phoenix area and general knowledge of the organization. Volunteers are in some ways are unpaid marketing tools because they tell their peers about the experiences they have and encourage those they know to join the cause as well ("Why Involve Volunteers?," n.d.). As demonstrated through prior research on volunteering, volunteer motivations and satisfaction play an important role in retaining volunteers. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the motivations, satisfaction, and likelihood of continuation in volunteering for the individuals who have served as volunteers at Alas de Amor within the past year.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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International Rescue Committee of Phoenix - Grant Proposal for a Prenatal Care Program

Description

The goal of the International Rescue Committee (IRC, created by Albert Einstein in 1933) is to serve those “whose lives and livelihoods are shattered by conflict and disaster to survive,

The goal of the International Rescue Committee (IRC, created by Albert Einstein in 1933) is to serve those “whose lives and livelihoods are shattered by conflict and disaster to survive, recover, and gain control of their future,” (6), by providing victims of humanitarian crises with health care, education, and counseling. The IRC of Phoenix branch holds this same mission through the services it provides to the refugees of the Phoenix area. One important need that is not currently met by the IRC of Phoenix is the special health care needs of pregnant refugee women. The IRC of Phoenix is seeking funds to initiate a new “Prenatal Care Program” to meet the needs of the 40 or so pregnant refugees who come to our area each year.
This new program will build upon the existing programs currently provided by the IRC of Phoenix, including support in areas of resettlement, finance, community integration, and health. The objectives of this new prenatal-focused program are to serve the needs of pregnant refugee women by providing the physical and emotional support they need through partnerships with hospitals (such as Saint Joseph’s Hospital) and organizations (such as the Refugee Women’s Health Clinic of Phoenix).
The target audience includes women who seek refuge in the Phoenix area in the midst of a pregnancy, or with the intention to become pregnant and who are receiving other services from the IRC of Phoenix. This grant will fund a prenatal care caseworker position for as long as there are incoming funds and pregnant refugee women in Phoenix. The prenatal care caseworker’s duties include:
● Monitoring the overall health of pregnant refugee women assisted by the IRC of Phoenix
● Expanding access to prenatal care for pregnant refugee women
● Connecting pregnant refugee women with necessary information on healthy pregnancies and introducing them to childcare programs that the IRC of Phoenix currently provides
● Creating and maintaining strong relationships with hospitals and health care facilities
● Accompanying pregnant refugee women to medical appointments as needed
● Participating in all other duties necessary to ensure the safe pregnancy of refugee women under the care of the IRC of Phoenix
To evaluate the success of the program, the IRC of Phoenix will monitor the number of pregnant refugee women seeking help and monitor health to see how the women are being served and the number of these women who are fully served based on the above objectives. The required grant money needed each year amounts to $40,000. A multi-year commitment of at least five years is expected. This funding represents the annual salary of the newly hired caseworker, and the IRC of Phoenix will be covering administration costs, supplies, and equipment.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Development of a Plan to Strengthen Volunteer Recruitment, Satisfaction, and Retention at Project CURE

Description

Volunteer motivation and satisfaction were assessed at Project CURE, a nonprofit that collects, sorts, tests, and ships donated medical supplies and equipment to healthcare facilities in developing countries. This research

Volunteer motivation and satisfaction were assessed at Project CURE, a nonprofit that collects, sorts, tests, and ships donated medical supplies and equipment to healthcare facilities in developing countries. This research was the result of a yearlong partnership between the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) program and Project CURE. Volunteers at Project CURE were surveyed (N=147) after completing a volunteer session to assess their motivation for volunteering, satisfaction with their experience, and any recommendations they had for improving the volunteer program. Five categories of motivating factors were assessed and it was found that the Values and Understanding categories were the strongest motivating factors. Overall, volunteers rated their experience highly, but the results indicated a number of small changes that Project CURE could make to better meet volunteers' needs, and better communicate the impact of volunteers' work, which could pave the way to increases in the numbers of volunteer hours Project CURE receives and increased quality of volunteer work.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Elderly People and Individuals with Disabilities: An Analysis of the Civil Right to Mobility

Description

Abstract Older adults and people with disabilities are two unique populations, though they intersect in their need for mobility options that are often not met by traditional transportation services. There

Abstract Older adults and people with disabilities are two unique populations, though they intersect in their need for mobility options that are often not met by traditional transportation services. There is consensus that the government should provide assistance for older adults and people with disabilities to achieve and maintain independence. However, the challenge lies in addressing the many forms of mobility inequity. Population projections for the twenty-first century have sparked interest in the rights of these two populations. As the population of the United States of America ages, supporting the mobility of seniors and individuals with disabilities will become imperative to maintaining their quality of life. One existing federal grant, Section 5310: Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities (49 U.S.C. 5310) provides formula funding for services that provide transportation options to older adults and people with disabilities. While the 5310 program provides crucial funding to non-profits and government agencies to support mobility options for older adults and people with disabilities, it does not address the full scope of mobility issues faced by these two communities. This thesis project provides a thorough analysis of this grant from the federal legislation it is founded on, to the local administration of this grant as applied by the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG). Finally, this thesis looks at emerging technology with the potential to revolutionize mobility, along with sobering historical context of the barriers faced older adults and people with disabilities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05