Matching Items (3)

136593-Thumbnail Image.png

Haptic Discrimination of Object Size via Tactile Sensation vs. Vibratory Sensory Substitution

Description

Humans rely on a complex interworking of visual, tactile and proprioceptive feedback to accomplish even the most simple of daily tasks. These senses work together to provide information about the

Humans rely on a complex interworking of visual, tactile and proprioceptive feedback to accomplish even the most simple of daily tasks. These senses work together to provide information about the size, weight, shape, density, and texture of objects being interacted with. While vision is highly relied upon for many tasks, especially those involving accurate reaches, people can typically accomplish common daily skills without constant visual feedback, instead relying on tactile and proprioceptive cues. Amputees using prosthetic hands, however, do not currently have access to such cues, making these tasks impossible. This experiment was designed to test whether vibratory haptic cues could be used in replacement of tactile feedback to signal contact for a size discrimination task. Two experiments were run in which subjects were asked to identify changes in block size between consecutive trials using wither physical or virtual blocks to test the accuracy of size discrimination using tactile and haptic feedback, respectively. Blocks randomly increased or decreased in size in increments of 2 to 12 mm between trials for both experiments. This experiment showed that subjects were significantly better at determining size changes using tactile feedback than vibratory haptic cues. This suggests that, while haptic feedback can technically be used to grasp and discriminate between objects of different sizes, it does not lend the same level of input as tactile cues.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

133398-Thumbnail Image.png

Development of a Wearable Haptic Feedback System for Use in Lower-Limb Prosthetics: Proof of Concept and Verification

Description

Skin and muscle receptors in the leg and foot provide able-bodied humans with force and position information that is crucial for balance and movement control. In lower-limb amputees however, this

Skin and muscle receptors in the leg and foot provide able-bodied humans with force and position information that is crucial for balance and movement control. In lower-limb amputees however, this vital information is either missing or incomplete. Amputees typically compensate for the loss of sensory information by relying on haptic feedback from the stump-socket interface. Unfortunately, this is not an adequate substitute. Areas of the stump that directly interface with the socket are also prone to painful irritation, which further degrades haptic feedback. The lack of somatosensory feedback from prosthetic legs causes several problems for lower-limb amputees. Previous studies have established that the lack of adequate sensory feedback from prosthetic limbs contributes to poor balance and abnormal gait kinematics. These improper gait kinematics can, in turn, lead to the development of musculoskeletal diseases. Finally, the absence of sensory information has been shown to lead to steeper learning curves and increased rehabilitation times, which hampers amputees from recovering from the trauma. In this study, a novel haptic feedback system for lower-limb amputees was develped, and studies were performed to verify that information presented was sufficiently accurate and precise in comparison to a Bertec 4060-NC force plate. The prototype device consisted of a sensorized insole, a belt-mounted microcontroller, and a linear array of four vibrotactile motors worn on the thigh. The prototype worked by calculating the center of pressure in the anteroposterior plane, and applying a time-discrete vibrotactile stimulus based on the location of the center of pressure.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

158224-Thumbnail Image.png

Modern Sensory Substitution for Vision in Dynamic Environments

Description

Societal infrastructure is built with vision at the forefront of daily life. For those with

severe visual impairments, this creates countless barriers to the participation and

enjoyment of life’s opportunities. Technological progress

Societal infrastructure is built with vision at the forefront of daily life. For those with

severe visual impairments, this creates countless barriers to the participation and

enjoyment of life’s opportunities. Technological progress has been both a blessing and

a curse in this regard. Digital text together with screen readers and refreshable Braille

displays have made whole libraries readily accessible and rideshare tech has made

independent mobility more attainable. Simultaneously, screen-based interactions and

experiences have only grown in pervasiveness and importance, precluding many of

those with visual impairments.

Sensory Substituion, the process of substituting an unavailable modality with

another one, has shown promise as an alternative to accomodation, but in recent

years meaningful strides in Sensory Substitution for vision have declined in frequency.

Given recent advances in Computer Vision, this stagnation is especially disconcerting.

Designing Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs) for vision for use in interactive settings

that leverage modern Computer Vision techniques presents a variety of challenges

including perceptual bandwidth, human-computer-interaction, and person-centered

machine learning considerations. To surmount these barriers an approach called Per-

sonal Foveated Haptic Gaze (PFHG), is introduced. PFHG consists of two primary

components: a human visual system inspired interaction paradigm that is intuitive

and flexible enough to generalize to a variety of applications called Foveated Haptic

Gaze (FHG), and a person-centered learning component to address the expressivity

limitations of most SSDs. This component is called One-Shot Object Detection by

Data Augmentation (1SODDA), a one-shot object detection approach that allows a

user to specify the objects they are interested in locating visually and with minimal

effort realizing an object detection model that does so effectively.

The Personal Foveated Haptic Gaze framework was realized in a virtual and real-

world application: playing a 3D, interactive, first person video game (DOOM) and

finding user-specified real-world objects. User study results found Foveated Haptic

Gaze to be an effective and intuitive interface for interacting with dynamic visual

world using solely haptics. Additionally, 1SODDA achieves competitive performance

among few-shot object detection methods and high-framerate many-shot object de-

tectors. The combination of which paves the way for modern Sensory Substitution

Devices for vision.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020