Matching Items (17)

133333-Thumbnail Image.png

Where to From Here? A Comprehensive Analysis of Past and Future of The Republic of Cuba

Description

This paper analyzes modern day Cuba and draws conclusions about the most likely future political and economic events that will take place. Because of Cuba's troubled economy, leadership change and the world's continued shift towards democratization, Cuba is in a

This paper analyzes modern day Cuba and draws conclusions about the most likely future political and economic events that will take place. Because of Cuba's troubled economy, leadership change and the world's continued shift towards democratization, Cuba is in a position where drastic changes in its government and economic structure may occur. This paper investigates Cuba's history, politics, economy, and the general quality of life of its citizens, which are used to help predict what may happen to the Cuban government in the near future. The paper also analyzes options for foreign nations' policy towards Cuba and summarizes what actions they may take to increase the likelihood of an economic and political transition. Cuba's economic structure needs drastic reform, the reluctant privatization only increases wealth disparity, trust in the government continues to get weaker as more information and its human rights violations are causes of huge concern. There are four possible outcomes for Cuba's future: stagnation, adopting the mixed economic model, a peaceful transition to a democratic model, and rebellion. There is evidence that Cuba will not make drastic policy changes in favor of liberalization in the immediate future, however, if the economic conditions are not improved and an economic crisis ensues, this paper asserts that another revolution or coup will likely occur. The resulting government may be a new autocratic leader that fills the vacuum of leadership, or a democratic regime depending on the nature of the rebellion. The exact future of Cuba is uncertain, but one thing is clear, change is on the horizon.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

133358-Thumbnail Image.png

Governments in Transition: The People's Voice

Description

Amidst transition are the citizens living and forging identity. This thesis is divided into three portions including Scotland, the Czech Republic, and Taiwan. Each section includes a history, literature, and interview investigation.
The analysis of Scotland includes the examination of

Amidst transition are the citizens living and forging identity. This thesis is divided into three portions including Scotland, the Czech Republic, and Taiwan. Each section includes a history, literature, and interview investigation.
The analysis of Scotland includes the examination of identity as a consequence of Scottish history, the Scottish Referendum, and the Brexit Referendum. National identity is explored through literature and through the analysis of Dr. Neal McGarvey, a Scottish Economic Councilman, and Arizona State University exchange student Scott Fyfe. Scotland expressed strong political activism realized through their political participation and open discussions. Yet, their ability to demand change is hindered by the United Kingdom and will continue to be unless drastic changes occur.
The analysis of the Czech Republic includes Czech history from World War II through the Prague Spring, the Velvet Revolution, the split of Czechoslovakia, and the current Communist party. National identity defined by literature is observed in conjunction with interviews of Lukáš Rumian, an Arizona State University exchange student, the Čižmár family with a unique military background and split support for Communism, an anonymous family with multigenerational viewpoints, and lastly, a former refugee with strong opinions on immigration and cultural preservation. The findings of the Czech Republic are of an apathetic country with few avenues for political discussion or education. The generations face massive difference in their mindsets as they continue to be influenced by their Communist past.
The examination of Taiwanese independence includes a look at centuries of domination, the Chinese Kuomintang party, and the Sunflower Revolution. National identity highlighted through literature is paired with the interviews of Kun Baba, a Taiwanese orchard owner, an anonymous set of a college student, his girlfriend, and his father, and a Taiwanese aboriginal who openly explores the “bullying” of China. Findings of Taiwan establish a growing sense of Taiwanese identity and an outward-looking approach to preserving their independence from China.
These three countries each shared a desire to forge their futures yet took different approaches. Scotland being vocal but limited by government. The Czech Republic apathetic, yet citizens take advantage of democratic freedoms. Taiwan is creating political stances through elections, yet is finding these stances to be inadequate in securing a future of continued independence. Thus they search for international assistance. In each country, I realized the importance global citizenship has in promoting political discussions in a quest to understand the needs and desires of citizens internationally. With a deepened understanding of a nation’s political climate, global citizens can help citizens voice their opinion, increase literature of citizen opinion, receive government recognition, and secure the change they desire.
Note: The interview participants range from college students to retirees, ages 17-78. Many asked for anonymous reporting to protect their identity and employment status.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

133429-Thumbnail Image.png

Age of Social Transition, Parental Acceptance, and Mental Health of Transgender Adults

Description

The rates of anxiety, depression, and attempted suicide for transgender individuals are extremely elevated relative to the general population. Yet, little research has been conducted about the transgender population regarding social transition (an individual presenting as their authentic/true gender, one

The rates of anxiety, depression, and attempted suicide for transgender individuals are extremely elevated relative to the general population. Yet, little research has been conducted about the transgender population regarding social transition (an individual presenting as their authentic/true gender, one different than the gender they were assigned at birth, in the context of everyday life) and parental acceptance. Both of which have been shown to impact the mental health of transgender individuals. The purposes of this study were: (1) To characterize a sample of transgender adults on their age of awareness of their authentic gender identity and their age of social transition. (2) Examine whether age of social transition, (3) parental acceptance, and (4) the gap in time between age of awareness and age of social transition (awareness-transition gap) were related to mental health. (5) Examine whether parental acceptance was related to age of social transition or to awareness-transition gap. (6) Examine whether age of social transition or awareness-transition gap interact with parental acceptance as correlates of mental health. The sample consisted of 115 transgender adults, ages 18 to 64. Measures were separated into 7 subheadings: demographics, transgender
on-cisgender identity, age of awareness, age of social transition, primary caregiver acceptance, secondary caregiver acceptance, and mental health. Hypotheses were partially supported for age of social transition with mental health, parental acceptance with mental health, and awareness-transition gap with parental acceptance. This study investigated under studied concepts of social transition and parental acceptance that appear to have an effect on the mental health of transgender adults.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

153893-Thumbnail Image.png

Populating and facilitating urban sustainability transition arenas

Description

Urban areas face a host of sustainability problems ranging from air and water quality, to housing affordability, and sprawl reducing returns on infrastructure investments, among many others. To address such challenges, cities have begun to envision generational sustainability transitions, and

Urban areas face a host of sustainability problems ranging from air and water quality, to housing affordability, and sprawl reducing returns on infrastructure investments, among many others. To address such challenges, cities have begun to envision generational sustainability transitions, and coalesce transition arenas in context to manage those transitions. Transition arenas coordinate the efforts of diverse stakeholders in a setting conducive to making evidence-based decisions that guide a transition forward. Though espoused and studied in the literature, transition arenas still require further research on the specifics of agent selection, arena setting, and decision-making facilitation. This dissertation has three related contributions related to transition arenas. First, it describes a process that took place within Phoenix that focused on identifying, recruiting, and building the capacity of potential transition agents for a transition arena. As part of this, a first draft suggestion of plausible steps to take for identifying, recruiting, and building a team of transition agents is proposed followed by a brief discussion on how this step-by-step process could be evaluated in subsequent work. Second, building on such engagement, this dissertation then offers criteria for transition agent selection based on a review of the literature that includes the setting in which a transition arena occurs, and strategies to support successful facilitation of decision-making in that setting. Third, those criteria are operationalized to evaluate the facilitation of a specific decision (draft of a new transportation plan) in a specific transition arena: the Citizens Committee for the future of Phoenix Transportation. The goal of this dissertation is to articulate a first-draft framework for guiding the development and scientific evaluation of transition arenas. Future work is required to empirically validate the framework in other real-world transition arenas. A feasible research agenda is provides to support this work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

150146-Thumbnail Image.png

Discovering pathways to sustainability: small communities in transition

Description

Driven by concern over environmental, economic and social problems, small, place based communities are engaging in processes of transition to become more sustainable. These communities may be viewed as innovative front runners of a transition to a more sustainable society

Driven by concern over environmental, economic and social problems, small, place based communities are engaging in processes of transition to become more sustainable. These communities may be viewed as innovative front runners of a transition to a more sustainable society in general, each one, an experiment in social transformation. These experiments present learning opportunities to build robust theories of community transition and to create specific, actionable knowledge to improve, replicate, and accelerate transitions in real communities. Yet to date, there is very little empirical research into the community transition phenomenon. This thesis empirically develops an analytical framework and method for the purpose of researching community transition processes, the ultimate goal of which is to arrive at a practice of evidence based transitions. A multiple case study approach was used to investigate three community transitions while simultaneously developing the framework and method in an iterative fashion. The case studies selected were Ashton Hayes, a small English village, BedZED, an urban housing complex in London, and Forres, a small Scottish town. Each community was visited and data collected by interview and document analysis. The research design brings together elements of process tracing, transformative planning and governance, sustainability assessment, transition path analysis and transition management within a multiple case study envelope. While some preliminary insights are gained into community transitions based on the three cases the main contribution of this thesis is in the creation of the research framework and method. The general framework and method developed has potential for standardizing and synthesizing research of community transition processes leading to both theoretical and practical knowledge that allows sustainability transition to be approached with confidence and not just hope.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

150321-Thumbnail Image.png

Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow over a dimpled flat plate using an immersed boundary technique

Description

Many methods of passive flow control rely on changes to surface morphology. Roughening surfaces to induce boundary layer transition to turbulence and in turn delay separation is a powerful approach to lowering drag on bluff bodies. While the influence in

Many methods of passive flow control rely on changes to surface morphology. Roughening surfaces to induce boundary layer transition to turbulence and in turn delay separation is a powerful approach to lowering drag on bluff bodies. While the influence in broad terms of how roughness and other means of passive flow control to delay separation on bluff bodies is known, basic mechanisms are not well understood. Of particular interest for the current work is understanding the role of surface dimpling on boundary layers. A computational approach is employed and the study has two main goals. The first is to understand and advance the numerical methodology utilized for the computations. The second is to shed some light on the details of how surface dimples distort boundary layers and cause transition to turbulence. Simulations are performed of the flow over a simplified configuration: the flow of a boundary layer over a dimpled flat plate. The flow is modeled using an immersed boundary as a representation of the dimpled surface along with direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The dimple geometry used is fixed and is that of a spherical depression in the flat plate with a depth-to-diameter ratio of 0.1. The dimples are arranged in staggered rows separated by spacing of the center of the bottom of the dimples by one diameter in both the spanwise and streamwise dimensions. The simulations are conducted for both two and three staggered rows of dimples. Flow variables are normalized at the inlet by the dimple depth and the Reynolds number is specified as 4000 (based on freestream velocity and inlet boundary layer thickness). First and second order statistics show the turbulent boundary layers correlate well to channel flow and flow of a zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layers in the viscous sublayer and the buffer layer, but deviates further away from the wall. The forcing of transition to turbulence by the dimples is unlike the transition caused by a naturally transitioning flow, a small perturbation such as trip tape in experimental flows, or noise in the inlet condition for computational flows.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

149564-Thumbnail Image.png

Postsecondary transition in Individuals on the autism spectrum

Description

Literature reviews, books, and research studies are reviewed in this thesis with the purpose of examining the postsecondary transition of young adults on the autism spectrum (AS). Previous research on the specific social, legislative, victimization, and self-determination issues that young

Literature reviews, books, and research studies are reviewed in this thesis with the purpose of examining the postsecondary transition of young adults on the autism spectrum (AS). Previous research on the specific social, legislative, victimization, and self-determination issues that young adults on the AS face during their postsecondary transition process is extensively examined as well as research that addresses the viewpoints of postsecondary programs from the perspectives of caregivers and young adults. Research studies and literature reviews that address current postsecondary programs for those on the AS and current adult outcomes for those on the AS are also included in the literature review section. The research aspect of the current thesis involved a postsecondary education transition team at Arizona State University who compared the viewpoints of young adults and parents of young adults on the AS on their experience with the postsecondary transition process and what they believe should be fundamental aspects of the postsecondary transition process. Two forms of a survey were administered (one for the young adult population and another for the parent population). Survey results found a lot of similarities and differences in terms of how caregivers and young adults felt about postsecondary transition. Although both young adults and caregivers expressed a strong interest in postsecondary programs for students with autism, both groups expressed that the likelihood of the young adult attending such a program would be significantly less. Differing viewpoints between the two populations existed on what a postsecondary program should look like. Although the two groups did agree that such programs should consist of an employment and social activities component, young adults felt that programs should have a more diverse set of criteria. Following completion of a secondary program, caregivers saw young adults attending a postsecondary education institution, while young adults perceived themselves as transferring directly into the workforce. On the contrary, caregivers did demonstrate an even variability in choice for opinions. The thesis concludes with the many implications for this study and suggestions for future research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

152592-Thumbnail Image.png

The effect of change facilitation coaching using the concerns-based adoption model with an urban elementary school teacher-leadership team

Description

Public demands for accountability and educational change are at an all-time high. No Child Left Behind set the stage for public accountability of educators and the recently created Race to the Top grant raised the stakes of public school accountability

Public demands for accountability and educational change are at an all-time high. No Child Left Behind set the stage for public accountability of educators and the recently created Race to the Top grant raised the stakes of public school accountability even more with the creation of national standards and assessments as well as public accountability of individual teacher performance based on student test scores. This high-stakes context has placed pressure on local schools to change their instructional practices rapidly to ensure students are learning what they need to in order to perform well on looming Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) exams. The purpose of this mixed methods action research study was to explore a shared leadership model and discover the impact of a change facilitation team using the Concerns Based Adoption Model tools on the speed and quality of innovation diffusion at a Title One elementary school. The nine-member change facilitation team received support for 20 weeks in the form of professional development and ongoing team coaching as a means to empower teacher-leaders to more effectively take on the challenges of change. Eight of those members participated in this research. This approach draws on the research on change, learning organizations, and coaching. Quantitative results from the Change Facilitator Stages of Concern Questionnaire were triangulated with qualitative data from interviews, field notes, and Innovation Configuration Maps. Results show the impact on instructional innovation when teacher-leadership is leveraged to support change. Further, there is an important role for change coaches when leading change initiatives. Implications from this study can be used to support other site leaders grappling with instructional innovation and calls for additional research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

151269-Thumbnail Image.png

ASD academic transitions: trends in parental perspective

Description

Academic transitions are a necessary and important part of an ASD student's life. Parental involvement and perspective is a vital part of each transition planning process. The primary goal of this research is to identify trends in parent perspectives regarding

Academic transitions are a necessary and important part of an ASD student's life. Parental involvement and perspective is a vital part of each transition planning process. The primary goal of this research is to identify trends in parent perspectives regarding ASD academic transitions through meta-synthesis of current research. The research also seeks to identify shifts in parent perceptions of the importance of specific transitional program elements during different academic transitional periods. Results indicate a clear trend within each academic transition category as well as trends throughout the transition periods. The main trend in parental perspective throughout the transitions is the de-structuration of the transition planning process and increased personalization with the advancement of each academic transition. Possible uses of research results to ease the transition planning process for parents are summarized and discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

154446-Thumbnail Image.png

Transfer Connections: welcoming new transfer students

Description

Focus has turned to the experiences of new transfer students in four-year institutions partially because of the mandate from President Obama for there to be more college graduates. Though transfer students are familiar with being college students, they still may

Focus has turned to the experiences of new transfer students in four-year institutions partially because of the mandate from President Obama for there to be more college graduates. Though transfer students are familiar with being college students, they still may not be accustomed to their new four-year institutions. At the time of this action research study, there were a very limited number of events to welcome new transfer students to the Arizona State University (ASU) Tempe campus. The purpose of this study was to create knowledge about the transition process of new transfer students to the Tempe campus. I worked with current transfer students to design a welcome event called Transfer Connections. By using a mixed methods design guided by retention and transition theories, a pre- and post-survey, individual interviews, and a focus group, I sought to answer questions about their transition process. In order to answer my research questions, this included exploring whether or not Transfer Connections had an influence on the success strategies they used, the type of support they gained, and their levels of feeling like they mattered. Since this was an action research study, I also explored my role as both a researcher and a practitioner. Results showed students did not learn specific success strategies, though they did learn about resources specific to ASU. The students also gained a level of support through the connections they made with other students. These connections influenced how the students felt they mattered to both ASU and other students. Future iterations of Transfer Connections will include more opportunities for new transfer students to develop connections.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016