Matching Items (6)

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Delving Deeper into Depression: An Examination of Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding of Depression, and the Implications for Policy Recommendations

Description

Depression presents itself as a daunting opponent capable of impacting mood, interpersonal relationships, and professional/academic performance (NIMH, n.d.). Unfortunately, depression among individuals between the ages of 12 and 17 has

Depression presents itself as a daunting opponent capable of impacting mood, interpersonal relationships, and professional/academic performance (NIMH, n.d.). Unfortunately, depression among individuals between the ages of 12 and 17 has risen at a startling rate (Families for Depression Awareness, n.d.). Teachers, however, hold an advantageous position when it comes to student depression intervention. The purpose of this study is to gather baseline data of pre-service teachers' knowledge about various aspects of depression and determine, in the participants' opinion, what teachers' roles in supporting students displaying signs of depression should be. Seven focus groups were interviewed and the Depression Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ) (Gabriel & Violato, 2009) was administered to 109 pre-service teachers in teacher preparation programs. Overall, participants believed that teachers should be responsible for students' well-being and thus should be active in supporting them. However, both MCQ scores and participants' comments in the focus groups revealed that more training for pre-service teachers on this topic is necessary.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Global Perspectives on Teacher Preparation and Quality: Implications for the United States

Description

This paper explores the importance of teacher preparation and quality as evidenced by three of the top-performing countries, Canada, Finland, and Singapore, on the 2015 Programme for International Students Assessment

This paper explores the importance of teacher preparation and quality as evidenced by three of the top-performing countries, Canada, Finland, and Singapore, on the 2015 Programme for International Students Assessment (PISA). All three of these countries have exemplary teacher preparation programs that are consistent nationwide with rigorous entry requirements, a demanding course load, and numerous opportunities to gain in-field experience. They also all compensate their teachers at a comparable salary to that of other occupations to incentivize more people to enter the field. In the United States, on the other hand, society devalues teachers, teachers are not paid what they deserve, and there is a lack of consistency in teacher preparation programs, specifically in regards to out-of-field teaching and the alternate ways people can become certified. These two issues have plagued America's educational system, and they have resulted in under-prepared teachers and lower-performing students. Not only is there inconsistency in the way that teachers enter into the profession, but teacher preparation programs themselves vary in their requirements. In order to improve its educational system, America must obtain more rigorous teacher preparation programs, increase teacher salary, provide prospective teachers with more classroom experience, and have specific admission requirements to be a part of the teaching profession. There is much that the United States can learn from the 2015 PISA results and the many successful educational systems around the world, and it is time that America pays attention to the wealth of international educational research available to better its teacher preparation programs and obtain more quality teachers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Preschool Teacher Training on Trauma and Resilience

Description

Childhood traumatic experiences are a prevalent public health issue. Children exposed to trauma often exhibit behaviors that make educating them challenging. Preschool teachers at a southwestern United States preschool receive

Childhood traumatic experiences are a prevalent public health issue. Children exposed to trauma often exhibit behaviors that make educating them challenging. Preschool teachers at a southwestern United States preschool receive no training related to childhood trauma and resilience. The purpose of this project was to educate preschool teachers on trauma and resilience to improve attitude related to educating children with trauma.

Following Arizona State University Internal Review Board approval, preschool teachers were recruited from a non-profit metropolitan preschool. Project included two pre-training questionnaires (Adult Resilience Measure-Revised [ARM-R] and Attitudes Related to Trauma Informed Care scale [ARTIC]), one two-hour training via Zoom on childhood trauma and resilience, and post-training ARTIC questionnaire at two and six weeks.

Seven teachers (n=7) participated in pre-training questionnaires, and three of these teachers (n=3) participated in both post-training questionnaires. All participating teachers were female and Caucasian. Average age of participants was 49.43 years (SD=8.40, range 36-60), and experience average was 17.17 years (SD=10.15, range 3-30). AMR-R average score was 72.29 (SD=8.28, range 61-83). Pre-training ARTIC score average was 3.87 (SD=0.16). Post-training ARTIC scores at two weeks and six weeks post-training were 3.65 (SD=0.22) and 3.86 (SD=0.25).

Clinical significance included improved teacher awareness of childhood trauma and improved ability to interact with children exposed to trauma. Teachers exhibited high resilience scores. Additional research needed related to further address educating preschool teachers related to trauma informed care, related to building resilience in children, and related to the impact of teacher resilience on trauma informed care.

Keywords: teacher training, adverse childhood experiences, ACEs, childhood trauma, resilience

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-04-12

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Teacher training to support refugee students in Maricopa County, AZ schools

Description

The United States is currently the world's largest reception and placement country of the nearly 22 million refugees worldwide. Of the numbers of refugees resettled, almost half of them

The United States is currently the world's largest reception and placement country of the nearly 22 million refugees worldwide. Of the numbers of refugees resettled, almost half of them are under the age of 18 and are arriving in American schools having experienced trauma, stress, and limited education during the conflict in their home country. Teacher experiences with refugee students can have a profound effect on the way refugee children feel they are received in the school community. Drawing on previous studies that emphasize the challenges that refugee students face, this thesis looks at the training that teachers receive that prepares them to work with refugee students in public schools in Maricopa County, Arizona. Through a review of the literature and data collected from teacher and former refugee student interviews, this research explores what teachers know and need to know to teach refugee students successfully. Innovative practices that teachers employ are also highlighted, and recommendations for further research, policy, and practice are provided.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Teaching the teachers: peer observations in elementary classrooms

Description

The United States is facing an unprecedented teacher shortage. With many studies estimating that 17-33% of teachers leave the profession within their first five years of starting a career, something

The United States is facing an unprecedented teacher shortage. With many studies estimating that 17-33% of teachers leave the profession within their first five years of starting a career, something needs to change to keep new teachers in the classroom. This study evaluates the effectiveness of peer observation as a learning tool to supplement the training of preservice teachers on an elementary campus. Observational learning theory and adult learning theory created the lens through which peer observations were implemented and evaluated in this study. Specifically, this study aimed to answer the following research questions: (a) How do conversations about teaching practices evolve over time between the preservice teacher participant and the researcher within the context of discussions following peer observations? and (b) How do peer observations influence the teaching practices of preservice teachers?

This study found that the preservice teachers who participated in the peer observation intervention improved in their teaching practices over the course of the semester, valued the experience of peer observation visits, and increased their ability to talk about teaching and learning in more sophisticated and complex terms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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STEMSS Strategies Professional Development to Support Academic Language Acquisition

Description

This study explored the effects of a science, technology, engineering, math, and social studies (STEMSS) professional development (PD) on teachers of language learners’ (TLLs) knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in teaching

This study explored the effects of a science, technology, engineering, math, and social studies (STEMSS) professional development (PD) on teachers of language learners’ (TLLs) knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in teaching content and language in tandem in their classrooms. With the growing population of English learners (ELs) in today’s classrooms, it is essential TLLs have the skills to support language development while teaching content. This study investigated a face-to-face PD that developed skills in supporting ELs’ academic vocabulary development using strategies in content lessons.

This research drew upon Shulman’s (2013) Knowledge Growth in Teaching Framework by looking at content, pedagogical, and curricular knowledge with the PD building knowledge and skills in addressing these areas of knowledge through the strategies. In addition, this research drew upon Lucas and Villegas’ (2013) Linguistically Responsive Teacher Education Model that addressed how teachers gain knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy to change pedagogical practices.

Title I Kindergarten through high school TLLs voluntarily participated in the PD. A mixed methods approach was used. Quantitative data was collected using a pre, post, and maintenance survey and qualitative data was collected through a lesson analysis, fall and spring observations, snapshot surveys, and focus groups.

Results suggested that the STEMSS PD increased knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in teaching ELs content and language using strategies that support academic vocabulary. The qualitative data supported the survey results in the increase of knowledge and skills immediately following the PD and increased self-efficacy a year following the PD. The results also suggested that the strategies supported through PD, lesson development, and time to implement may better address the needs of TLLs in the classroom.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020