Matching Items (3)

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The Inactivation of Pathogens in Contaminated Medications Via Selection Photonic Disinfection

Description

Each year the hospitals in the United States dispose of viable medications worth millions of dollars. These facilities are currently forced to do so not because the medications have expired, or are no longer effective, but rather because to re-use

Each year the hospitals in the United States dispose of viable medications worth millions of dollars. These facilities are currently forced to do so not because the medications have expired, or are no longer effective, but rather because to re-use any leftover medications would allow for the possibility of spreading disease. Once a medications sterile seal has been broken, any remaining contents of its container are considered potential pathogenic biohazards, and must be disposed of. The main objective of this thesis was to explore a potential alternative to simply discarding these lifesaving and often expensive leftover medications. The ultimate goal of this work is to establish a process by which excess drugs could be safely and effectively purified for re-use, subsequently cutting costs, and enhancing medication availability. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) and Staphylococcus aureus (S.a) were cultured for their commonality in healthcare-associated infections (HAI's), and allowed to contaminate medication-like compounds. These bacterially inoculated solutions were meant to mimic the contaminated medications mentioned above and were then treated with a novel, physical means of pathogen inactivation named SElective PHOtonic DISinfection (SEPHODIS). Pathogen load reduction was determined through plate count assays both before and after exposure to the SEPHODIS system. structural preservation of medication was established through the use of infrared spectroscopy. The results of these experiments furthered the confidence of SEPHODIS as an efficient means of pathogen inactivation, while promoting promise of a real-world application in the form of medication purification.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Ambassador Handbook

Description

Arizona State University and Banner Thunderbird Hospital have partnered to provide pre-med students with an internship at a local emergency department. Students entering into this program will have access to each patient's vital signs, medical imaging, lab tests, and medications.

Arizona State University and Banner Thunderbird Hospital have partnered to provide pre-med students with an internship at a local emergency department. Students entering into this program will have access to each patient's vital signs, medical imaging, lab tests, and medications. This access presents students with an opportunity to learn about a variety of tools used in the assessment and treatment of emergency room patients. In order to enhance the amount of knowledge students take away from the program, I created a handbook summarizing a variety of diagnostic tests and medications. The first section of the handbook (assessment) is spilt up into the three following categories: vital signs, medical imaging, and lab tests. The second section (treatment) consists of one category, medications. Each section was written with emphasis on basic physiology, and is intended to provide pre-med students with a foundation for building further medical knowledge. Although this handbook was tailored to the information students are most likely to encounter working in Banner Thunderbird Hospital's emergency department, it is still appropriate for any student interested in learning about emergency medicine.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Improving Programming and Treatment Effectiveness for Formerly Incarcerated Individuals with Mental Health Care Needs: An Analysis of Community Re-Entry Experiences Among Parole Officers

Description

This thesis examines the re-entry processes of individuals with mental health needs upon their release from prison. In order to uncover the resources that are provided to formerly incarcerated individuals with clinically diagnosed mental health issues, parole officers who have

This thesis examines the re-entry processes of individuals with mental health needs upon their release from prison. In order to uncover the resources that are provided to formerly incarcerated individuals with clinically diagnosed mental health issues, parole officers who have experience supervising individuals with mental health needs were interviewed. The purpose of the interviews was to understand the experiences parole officers have regarding current supervision practices that are used, as well as programming and treatment opportunities parole officers know are available to this population of re-entrants. Being aware of the resources that are provided to formerly incarcerated individuals with mental health needs will help identify how to improve supervision, programming, and treatment so as to better support this population. As research and literature on the re-entry experiences of individuals with mental health care needs have demonstrated the extensive privations this population experiences, interviewing parole officers will reveal the roles parole officers, treatment providers, and programming have in supporting this population upon their release from prison. Moreover, interviewing parole officers will help identify how to improve parole outcomes for re-entrants with clinically diagnosed mental health issues.

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Date Created
2021-12