Matching Items (19)

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Laugh With Me: A Look at Stand-Up Comics Working in the Greater Phoenix Area

Description

I never feel completely comfortable with someone until I know I can make them laugh. Humor has played an important role in all of my personal relationships, with friends, family

I never feel completely comfortable with someone until I know I can make them laugh. Humor has played an important role in all of my personal relationships, with friends, family and coworkers. For this reason, humor has always fascinated me. One person's sense of humor can differ so greatly from another's, yet the reaction of laughter is the same. Entering college, I saw the field of psychology as the most direct path to studying humor. My thesis was always going to address humor in some way, and I decided that the best way to study humor was through stand-up comedians. These performers spend most of their time trying to make other people laugh, but they don't seem very happy. I decided to watch local shows and interview local comedians, with the goal of better understanding this relationship between humor and sadness. Specifically, I wanted to find out how these comedians use humor to deal with negative experiences in their lives. I conducted interviews with six local stand-up comics, who have experienced varying degrees of success in their stand-up careers. The questions for the interviews were developed to best determine how the comics had decided to work in stand-up comedy, what their career trajectories had looked like, how they develop their material, how humor connects to negative experiences in their lives, and how committed each comic was to performing stand-up. Also, I hoped to gain a better understanding of what role stand-up played in shaping the identity of each comic. Interviews lasted between 40 and 75 minutes. I interviewed the local stand-up comics Iesha Renee, Shapel Lacey, Anwar Newton, Mike Enders and Charles Engle, and Michael Turner.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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A Study on Brazilian Secondary Teachers in a Community of Practice Focused on Critical Thinking

Description

The purpose of this action research was to work with Brazilian trained educators in a Community of Practice (CoP) to explore how teachers collectively define and talk about critical thinking

The purpose of this action research was to work with Brazilian trained educators in a Community of Practice (CoP) to explore how teachers collectively define and talk about critical thinking (CT). The research also examined how past teaching experiences shaped their attitudes toward emphasizing CT in teaching. In addition, the research studied how participation in a CoP focused on CT changed classroom planning. The study is grounded in Community of Practice and Social Constructivism. As an international school, this study examined related research conducted in Jordan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Pakistan. This qualitative action research was 12 weeks in length with six participants who were all from Brazil and worked at a private bilingual international secondary school. Participants completed an initial interview and final interview. They also completed online journals, which were assembled weekly for 45 minutes, and maximized their efforts constructing a unit plan utilizing the Understanding by Design method. The results of the study describe the teachers’ definition of critical thinking, and also present an understanding of how the CoP shaped their attitudes. This, in turn, resulted in members’ updated classroom planning, which was due to participation in the cohort. Further issues and credibility, contextualization, and transferability as well as researcher positionality were discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Developing Critically Conscious Pre-Service Teachers: A Social Justice Approach to Educate Culturally Linguistically Diverse Students

Description

One of the major issues confronting education in Arizona and across the United States has been the consistent low performance of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students in comparison to

One of the major issues confronting education in Arizona and across the United States has been the consistent low performance of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students in comparison to their peers as evidenced by the disparity of the achievement gap at every level in the educational pipeline. A contributing factor has been the lack of teacher preparation focused on teaching CLD students. Preparation focused on a culturally responsive curriculum about dispositions and pedagogical knowledge and skills as well as field experience placement with CLD students have been previously identified areas to consider when training preservice teachers (PSTs). Therefore, this study examined how a Culturally Responsive and Linguistic Teaching (CRLT) Framework would raise preservice teacher’s critical consciousness about teaching CLD students. The CRLT Framework focused on two specific areas; (a) a culturally responsive curriculum and (b) a team-based service-learning experience. The CRP curriculum included lessons designed to increase PSTs understanding about how their sociolinguist views influenced their pedagogical knowledge about teaching CLD students. In addition, the team-based service-learning approach, as a community of practice, provided experiences for PSTs to apply theory to practice. A mixed method analysis was employed to collect and analyze the quantitative data (surveys) and qualitative data (interviews and photovoice). Results from this study suggested increases in PSTs’ knowledge, self-efficacy, and perceptions of usefulness of CRP in their future practices. The team-based, service-learning component, which was based on a community of practice framework, enhanced the learning experience by allowing students to move from theory to practice and served as an important contributing factor to the overall results. Given the findings of this research study, it appeared that an introductory course focused on a culturally responsive and linguistic teaching influenced PSTs’ dispositions, knowledge, and skills. Thus, providing an introductory course, earlier rather than later, has the potential to change the trajectory of preparing PSTs so they were more prepared to teach CLD students as they continued through their program of study. Results showed effective work with CLD students was about so much more than ‘just good teaching.’

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Faculty and Staff Perception of Their Role in Student Success

Description

ABSTRACT

Faculty and staff can create barriers by not understanding their role in student success. This study began with an artifact analysis of 20 documents to better understand how

ABSTRACT

Faculty and staff can create barriers by not understanding their role in student success. This study began with an artifact analysis of 20 documents to better understand how faculty and staff at Concordia University Texas were operationalizing student success. The results of the artifact analysis showed a lack of recorded dialogue around student success at regular business meetings, as well as pattern of deficit language approach to policy and procedure in the student handbooks Next, this study evaluated the impacts of using a Community of Practice as a change agent to help faculty and staff better understand their roles in student success and specifically to establish a definition of student success. Using a mixed method, action research approach, results showed that the Community of Practice was successful in terms of transfer or knowledge and creating a sense of purpose for participants regarding their role in student success. Results showed that participating in a Community of Practice was successful in helping faculty and staff not only understand their own role in student success, but understand their place among others in the unified goal to help students succeed. The Community of Practice participants completed the research with a better understanding of how and why collaborating with different departments enables faculty and staff to better help students. Additionally, the participants concluded that a visual reminder of student success (figurines, students stories, student pictures) ensured that student success was the first thing they thought about when completing their daily work.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Increasing external teacher evaluators' self-efficacy during teacher evaluation conferences

Description

This mixed methods action research project focused on improving external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. More specifically, this project explored how and to

This mixed methods action research project focused on improving external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. More specifically, this project explored how and to what extent an intervention of a professional development model influenced external teacher evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences and how the intervention influenced external evaluators’ perception of effectiveness when providing feedback during pre- and post- evaluation conferences.

Self-efficacy theory, sociocultural theory, and the community of practice framework informed the intervention. Six external teacher evaluators participated in the study from July through December of 2017. The professional development model consisted of cycles of community of practice meetings, buddy shadowing experiences, post-buddy shadowing reflective conversations, and personal reflection. Data were collected in the form of pre- and post-intervention surveys, pre- and post-intervention interviews, reflective journal entries, and Wordles.

The results from this study indicated an increase in the evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing feedback during teacher evaluation conferences and an increase in perceived effectiveness. Successful experiences of providing feedback during teacher evaluation conferences, experiences of observing and listening to other evaluators, and engagement in reflective conversations influenced external evaluators’ self-efficacy for providing effective feedback during teacher evaluation conferences. The external evaluators expressed value in the professional development experience. During the intervention, evaluators gained ideas and strategies to apply in their practice and engaged in high levels of reflection. Outcomes from the research project suggest two main implications for practice: professional development in the form of social learning and reflection as a process for growth.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Tseunis Transformative Teacher Induction Plan, T3IP: TTTIPing the scale in favor of reform

Description

Facing a teacher shortage in math, science, and language arts secondary courses, a suburban, unified, K-12 district partnered with a university in the southwest to create a program for alternatively

Facing a teacher shortage in math, science, and language arts secondary courses, a suburban, unified, K-12 district partnered with a university in the southwest to create a program for alternatively certified teachers. This specialized program permitted candidates to teach with an intern certificate while completing university coursework leading to certification. During this timeframe, the researcher-practitioner of this study created an alternative teacher induction program focused on cycles of action research. The model was created to capitalize on the content knowledge and work experience of alternatively certified teachers in order to inspire innovation by offering a district-based induction centering on cycles of action research. In the teachers' third year, each teacher conducted action research projects within the framework of Leader Scholar Communities which were facilitated by mentor teachers from the district with content expertise. This study examines the effects of such a model on teachers' identities and propensity toward transformative behaviors. A mixed methods approach was used to investigate the research questions and to help the researcher gain a broader perspective on the topic. Data were collected through a teacher efficacy survey, questionnaire, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, observations, and electronic data. The results from the study indicated that the participants in the study exhibited signs of professional teaching identity, especially in the constructs of on-going process, relationship between person and context, and teacher agency. Additionally, the participants referenced numerous perspective transformations as a result of participating in cycles of action research within the framework of a Community of Practice framework. Implications from this study include valuing alternatively certified teachers, creating outcome-based teacher induction programs, and replicating the T3IP model to include professional development opportunities beyond this unique context.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Cross-disciplinary collaboration between two science disciplines at a community college

Description

Health science students like students in many disciplines exhibit difficulty with transferring content from one course to another. For example, the problem explored in this study occurred when overlapping

Health science students like students in many disciplines exhibit difficulty with transferring content from one course to another. For example, the problem explored in this study occurred when overlapping concepts were presented in introductory biology and chemistry courses, but students could not transfer the concepts to the other disciplinary course. In this mixed method action research study, the author served as facilitator/leader of a group of colleagues tasked with investigating and taking steps to resolve this student learning transfer problem. This study outlines the details of how an interdisciplinary community of practice (CoP) formed between chemistry and biology faculty members at a community college to address the problem and the benefits resulting from the CoP. Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained from transcripts of meetings of the faculty members, notes from other formal and informal meetings, classroom visits, a questionnaire containing Likert and open-ended items and interviews. Transcripts, notes, and interviews were coded to determine common themes. Findings suggested the CoP was an effective means to deal with the matter of student transfer of content across courses. In particular, the CoP agreed to use similar terminology, created materials to be used consistently across the courses, and explored other transfer specific approaches that allowed for transfer of course content. Finally, the benefits of the CoP were due in large part to the collaboration that took place among participants.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Listen to the poet" [electronic resource]: what schools can learn from a diverse spoken word poetry group in the urban southwest

Description

This dissertation shares findings from a yearlong qualitative case study of Young Voices Rise (YVR), a diverse spoken word poetry group in the urban Southwest. The study examined the group's

This dissertation shares findings from a yearlong qualitative case study of Young Voices Rise (YVR), a diverse spoken word poetry group in the urban Southwest. The study examined the group's characteristics and practices, adolescent members' views of their writing and themselves as writers, and changes members attributed to their experiences in YVR. Data sources included interviews with six adolescent poets and two adult teaching artists, observations of writing workshops and poetry slams, collection of group announcements through social media, and collection of poems. Sociocultural theory guided the study's design, and grounded theory was used to analyze data. This study found that YVR is a community of practice that offers multiple possibilities for engagement and fosters a safe space for storytelling. The adolescent participants have distinct writing practices and a strong sense of writing self; furthermore, they believe YVR has changed them and their writing. This study has several implications for secondary English language arts. Specifically, it recommends that teachers build safe spaces for storytelling, offer spoken word poetry as an option for exploring various topics and purposes, attend to writers' practices and preferences, encourage authentic participation and identity exploration, and support spoken word poetry school-wide.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Expanding a secondary swim/safety curriculum through a community of practice

Description

Recently, a student in a Maricopa County, Arizona area school district drowned during a physical education class, resulting in a heightened awareness of school aquatics safety guidelines. The goal of

Recently, a student in a Maricopa County, Arizona area school district drowned during a physical education class, resulting in a heightened awareness of school aquatics safety guidelines. The goal of this study was to use Wenger's idea of nurturing a Community of Practice (CoP) with the existing physical education CoP at GFJRHS (school pseudonym), to examine the current curriculum and enhance the program and safety standards. The study duration was a five-week period; the participants were 7th grade males. This action research addressed the following questions: 1.)To what extent does the new swim curriculum increase students' (a) self-efficacy for swimming, (b) self-efficacy for water safety, (c) perception of swim skills, and (d) perception of water safety skills? 2.) How, and to what extent, do students value different observational learning techniques presented during the swim unit? 3.) To what extent does the new swim curriculum increase students' swimming capabilities? 4.) How does working as a Community of Practice influence implementing an enhanced swim curriculum? 5.) What challenges and improvements do participants report during the enhanced curriculum? A triangulation mixed methods design was used to determine whether observational learning techniques and mini aquatics safety lessons incorporated into the curriculum improved students' swimming ability, self-efficacy, and safety knowledge. Pre-and post-test swim assessments, pre- and post-test surveys, focus group interviews and researcher journal observations provided data for the study. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to integrate the strengths of the varied forms of research. Cronbach's coefficient α was computed for the reliability of the survey and a multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to determine whether the new swim curriculum increased students' self-efficacy for swimming, self-efficacy for water safety, perception of swim skills, perception of water safety skills, and swimming capabilities. Results of this study indicated students' self-efficacy and perception of water safety skills increased, students' ability and perception of swimming skills increased, students valued all observational learning techniques, and teachers felt that functioning as a CoP was crucial to the process.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Art Museum Educators and Curators: An Examination of Art Interpretation Priorities and Teacher Identities

Description

The general field of interest of this study was art education in the context of art museums in the United States. The vehicle of a mixed method, descriptive research design

The general field of interest of this study was art education in the context of art museums in the United States. The vehicle of a mixed method, descriptive research design was used to investigate whether museum educator and curator participants had tendencies to use personal or communal approaches (Barrett, 2000) to teaching art interpretation to adult visitors. While the personal approach to art interpretation focused on individuals' responses to artworks, the communal approach emphasized the community of art scholars' shared understandings of artworks.

Understanding the communities of practice of the participants was integral to the discovery of meaning in the study's findings. Wenger (1998) introduced the theory of community of practice to explain how individuals, who are united in a particular context, shared similar perspectives, learned socially from each other, and gained a sense of identity through their routines and interactions. The study examined how museum educators' and curators' separate communities of practice influenced their members' teaching approaches through the development of distinct teacher personae. Teacher personae reflected the educational values and priorities of museum educators' and curators' communities of practice. And, teacher personae had tendencies to adopt personal or communal approaches to art interpretation.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014