Matching Items (16)

133264-Thumbnail Image.png

Volunteer Meraki: Nonprofit Market Research, Cultural Program and Project Launch

Description

This thesis describes various steps in creation of Volunteer Meraki, an international volunteer organization. Continuing from the past findings from Nicholas Pfeiffer and Hunter Workman (Pfeiffer and Workman, 2016), a

This thesis describes various steps in creation of Volunteer Meraki, an international volunteer organization. Continuing from the past findings from Nicholas Pfeiffer and Hunter Workman (Pfeiffer and Workman, 2016), a new study was held to examine the interest of students of Arizona State University in volunteering internationally and becoming involved with Volunteer Meraki as well as to investigate perceived successes and weaknesses of other nonprofit organizations focused on international volunteering. These findings of this studiesy guided guides the creation of the organization, the marketing plan, and the program design of Volunteer Meraki. The market research component of this program serves to help us decide the desirability of creating an ASU club, as well as helps us shape our organization to accommodate volunteers. Students were asked for their experience and interest in volunteering and clubs. The results of this study supported suggest the benefits of an ASU club, and inform on the major concerns volunteers have with volunteer projects and organizations. These results are addressed in Volunteer Meraki's marketing plan, internal functions plan and international volunteer program design. With findings on interests and barriers that students had in relation to international volunteering, Volunteer Meraki has been structured to address the concerns with organization administration, culturally competent programs, and contextually relevant impact on community development. With the guiding principles of mindfulness, sustainability, and integrity, Volunteer Meraki serves as an organization dedicated to building sustainable and successful partnerships that address the needs of marginalized and impoverished communities through mindful and culturally sensitive volunteer engagement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

147580-Thumbnail Image.png

Managing an Online Presence in Nonprofit Organizations: A Multi-Frame Analysis to Improve Fundraising Opportunities for an Animal Rescue Shelter

Description

This thesis project utilizes a multi-frame analysis from Bolman and Deal’s Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice and Leadership to reinvent a fundraising opportunity for a nonprofit organization named Save the Cats

This thesis project utilizes a multi-frame analysis from Bolman and Deal’s Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice and Leadership to reinvent a fundraising opportunity for a nonprofit organization named Save the Cats Arizona. This thesis begins with what makes Save the Cats Arizona stand out from other organizations. From there, a breakdown of the organization’s structure is provided. Next, research is provided on the impacts of fundraising on social media platforms and online engagement across nonprofit organizations. Additional research is provided to highlight the importance of social media management in nonprofit organizations. Save the Cats Arizona is then analyzed through Bolman and Deal’s multi-frame theory – which includes the structural, human-resource, political, and symbolic frame. Finally, the knowledge gained from the multi-frame analysis is implemented into ideas on how to improve fundraising opportunities for Save the Cats Arizona. This project ends with a reflection about this thesis and Save the Cats Arizona’s future.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

148252-Thumbnail Image.png

Animal Overpopulation in California: Addressing the Issues of Overpopulation and Euthanasia of Stray Animals through the Creation of a Non-profit Animal Relocation Organization

Description

Every year, nearly 1.5 shelter animals are euthanized.(1) By the end of 2020, California was reported to be responsible for the second most dog euthanasia’s in the United States, behind

Every year, nearly 1.5 shelter animals are euthanized.(1) By the end of 2020, California was reported to be responsible for the second most dog euthanasia’s in the United States, behind Texas by nearly 15,000 dogs. Sadly, these numbers do not include the euthanizing of cats which is generally a fraction larger. Additionally, a majority of numbers tallied by euthanasia centers do not include animals that younger than 1 month old and under 2 pounds. These animals are referred to as “neonate,” which is essentially unsavable newborns. In fact, the New York Times writes, “Many of the shelters do not track outcomes uniformly or make historical data readily available online. Until recently, there has not been a concerted national effort to standardize and compile shelter records.”(2) If these numbers were to be included, we would see a large spike for shelter euthanasia’s in every state. <br/>Traveling Paws is a 501(c)3 Nonprofit Organization that was created to help reduce the number of shelter and stray animals euthanized in California. Our mission is to rehome animals from dangerous environments and kill shelters into their “forever homes,” or shelter facilities where they then can further be adopted and live out the rest of their lives happily. In addition to animal relocation, our team has begun programs such as sheltering, fostering, and put an emphasis on a trap, neuter, and return program to help increase the health and safety, while reducing reproduction rates of stray cats in the Southern California region. While we have been able to substantially help animals located in areas of Southern California, our work is nowhere near complete. <br/>Through this write up, I will tell you the story of my journey, creating and managing our nonprofit organization, along with our successes, problems faced, business plans to help guide us toward our future goals and success, and what I have learned throughout the process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

148283-Thumbnail Image.png

Animal Overpopulation in California: Addressing the Issues of Overpopulation and Euthanasia of Stray Animals through the Creation of a Non-profit Animal Relocation Organization

Description

Every year, nearly 1.5 shelter animals are euthanized.(1) By the end of 2020, California was reported to be responsible for the second most dog euthanasia’s in the United States, behind

Every year, nearly 1.5 shelter animals are euthanized.(1) By the end of 2020, California was reported to be responsible for the second most dog euthanasia’s in the United States, behind Texas by nearly 15,000 dogs. Sadly, these numbers do not include the euthanizing of cats which is generally a fraction larger. Additionally, a majority of numbers tallied by euthanasia centers do not include animals that younger than 1 month old and under 2 pounds. These animals are referred to as “neonate,” which is essentially unsavable newborns. In fact, the New York Times writes, “Many of the shelters do not track outcomes uniformly or make historical data readily available online. Until recently, there has not been a concerted national effort to standardize and compile shelter records.”(2) If these numbers were to be included, we would see a large spike for shelter euthanasia’s in every state. <br/>Traveling Paws is a 501(c)3 Nonprofit Organization that was created to help reduce the number of shelter and stray animals euthanized in California. Our mission is to rehome animals from dangerous environments and kill shelters into their “forever homes,” or shelter facilities where they then can further be adopted and live out the rest of their lives happily. In addition to animal relocation, our team has begun programs such as sheltering, fostering, and put an emphasis on a trap, neuter, and return program to help increase the health and safety, while reducing reproduction rates of stray cats in the Southern California region. While we have been able to substantially help animals located in areas of Southern California, our work is nowhere near complete. <br/>Through this write up, I will tell you the story of my journey, creating and managing our nonprofit organization, along with our successes, problems faced, business plans to help guide us toward our future goals and success, and what I have learned throughout the process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

147562-Thumbnail Image.png

An Explorative Study of the Challenges and Opportunities Surrounding Nonprofit Social Media Marketing

Description

This thesis paper examines the challenges and opportunities that are present for nonprofit organizations seeking to engage in social media marketing. By analyzing the rise of social media as a

This thesis paper examines the challenges and opportunities that are present for nonprofit organizations seeking to engage in social media marketing. By analyzing the rise of social media as a prevalent tool for business-consumer outreach the paper proposes a dialogic approach to social media for nonprofits to effectively engage with their audiences, develop relationships with them, and mobilize them towards a common mission.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

150769-Thumbnail Image.png

From policy to practice: implementing "Move On When Ready" at the local level in Arizona

Description

The purpose of this study was to understand what promotes or hinders the implementation of a high school education reform policy in Arizona schools from the perspective of a nonprofit

The purpose of this study was to understand what promotes or hinders the implementation of a high school education reform policy in Arizona schools from the perspective of a nonprofit organization that served an active and intentional role as an intermediary organization working directly with schools and policymakers. The study was intended to facilitate implementation of the education reform policy in the school sites, to gain knowledge that will be used to inform future cycles of planning and implementation, and to influence state policy. This study was an explanatory nonexperimental multiple case study involving five high schools across Arizona. The study focused on the early phase of implementation of the education reform policy. A mixed methods case study design grounded in the tradition of participatory action research was employed. Data were collected through surveys, interviews, observations, focus groups, and a document review. The results suggest that the education reform policy was implementable in diverse schools across the state. However, how the education reform policy was implemented in each school site appeared to vary. A number of factors seemed to influence the actual implementation process including the design and understanding of the reform, selection process, district context and school characteristics, and school capacity to undertake the reform. The findings suggest that the nonprofit organization that served as an intermediary organization within the study influenced the implementation process. It appears that this primarily took place by providing direct assistance to the schools, creating opportunities for collaboration and communication across the multiple school sites implementing the same education reform policy, and serving as a connector to other organizations, policymakers, and the larger public. The study resulted in the nonprofit organization's deeper understanding of the complexity of implementing the education reform policy, the challenges schools face in implementing the reform, and the factors that appear to promote or impede the implementation process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

155662-Thumbnail Image.png

Organizational learning for climate change adaptation: a case study of four NGOs in India

Description

For a country like India which is highly vulnerable to climate change, the need to focus on adaptation in tandem with traditional development is immense, as the two are inextricably

For a country like India which is highly vulnerable to climate change, the need to focus on adaptation in tandem with traditional development is immense, as the two are inextricably tied together. As a prominent actor working at the intersection of these two fields, NGOs need to be prepared for the emerging challenges of climate change. While research indicates that investments in learning can be beneficial for this purpose, there are limited studies looking into organizational learning within NGOs working on climate change adaptation. This study uses a multiple case study design to explore learning mechanisms, and trace learning over time within four development NGOs working on climate change adaptation in India. These insights could be useful for development NGOs looking to enhance their learning to meet the challenges of climate change. More broadly, this research adds to the understanding of the role of learning in climate change adaptation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

152961-Thumbnail Image.png

Dimensions of partnership in cross-sector relationships: a multi-case study of local education foundations

Description

Cross-sector interactions are regularly seen in healthcare, education, defense, public safety, and other social service contexts where the public interest and the private individual intersect. While interest in cross-sector

Cross-sector interactions are regularly seen in healthcare, education, defense, public safety, and other social service contexts where the public interest and the private individual intersect. While interest in cross-sector relationships is neither new nor novel, the organizational dynamics and contexts continue to change and challenge our understanding of what is meant by partnership, alliance, collaboration, or cooperation between independent organizations from different sectors. One type of cooperative arrangement between nonprofits and government are affiliated foundations, which are part of the landscape of emerging organizational hybrids and expanding government-nonprofit relationships. Affiliated foundations are nonprofits designed to support a specific entity by generating charitable resources. This dissertation looks at one specific context for affiliated foundation/ "parent" relationships through a multi-case study of local educations in Florida. Specifically, this research examines how local education foundations carry out a partnering relationship with the school district. Through a combination of three instrumental case studies of local education foundations, and fifteen other purposely selected foundations, this dissertation presents the results of a cross-case analysis of the partnership between local education foundations and school districts. Partnership is conceptualized across four dimensions: 1) attention, 2) successive engagement, 3) resource infusion, and 4) positional identity. This research reveals that through the four dimensions of partnership, we can account for the variation across embedded, interdependent, or independent local education foundations in relation to the school district, or their "parent" organization. As a result, local education foundations reflect different relationships with school districts, which ultimately impacts their ability to carry out their work as charitable organizations, derived from the community in which they operate, and designed to generate resources and support for public education. By looking at this specific context, we can consider the complexities of an affiliated relationship between two structurally separate but linked organizations assumed to act as partners, but working to achieve a partnership. Where cooperation, collaboration, and innovation are intended outcomes of affiliated foundation/government relationships, this research considers the role of affiliated foundations among more traditional cross-sector relationships where services and contracts tend to dominate.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

155197-Thumbnail Image.png

Case study: the closing of the Arizona interfaith alliance for worker justice and implications on barriers to civic engagement in its wake

Description

The Arizona Interfaith Alliance for Worker Justice (AIAWJ) was a mediating structure for those who wanted to be civically engaged in the labor movement and other coalitions in Phoenix, Arizona.

The Arizona Interfaith Alliance for Worker Justice (AIAWJ) was a mediating structure for those who wanted to be civically engaged in the labor movement and other coalitions in Phoenix, Arizona. It not only served its constituents, but it integrated, educated, and empowered them. Due to lack of funding the AIAWJ closed in the summer of 2016. Many community members from marginalized neighborhoods, other concerned citizens, students, myself, and others participated in their first and only civic engagement opportunities through this organization and were subsequently left with no connections, a barrier to being civically engaged. Through interviews and secondary data research, the relationship between people, mediating structures, and civic engagement activity are examined. The key findings support existing research that emphasizes the importance of mediating structures when it comes to civic engagement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

155676-Thumbnail Image.png

Evaluating Public Value Failure in the Nonprofit Context: An Interpretive Case Study of Food Banking in the U.S.

Description

In the U.S., one of the most affluent countries in the world, hunger and food waste are two social problems that coexist in an ironic way. Food banks have become

In the U.S., one of the most affluent countries in the world, hunger and food waste are two social problems that coexist in an ironic way. Food banks have become one key alternative solution to those problems because of their capacity to collect and distribute surplus food to those in need as well as to mobilize collective efforts of various organizations and citizens. However, the understanding of U.S. food banking remains limited due to research gaps in the literature. Previous public values research fails to address the key role of nonprofit organizations in achieving public values, while prior nonprofit and food bank studies suffer from insufficiently reflecting the value-driven nature in evaluating overall social impacts. Inspired by these gaps, this study asks the following question: how does food banking in the U.S. respond to public value failure?

To address this question, this study employs the interpretive approach as the logic of inquiry and the public value mapping framework as the analytic tool to contemplate the overall social impacts of U.S. food banking. Data sources include organizational documents of 203 U.S. food banks, as well as other public documents and literature pertaining to U.S. food banks.

Using public value mapping analysis, this study constructs a public value logic, which manifests the dynamics of prime and instrumental values in the U.S. food banking context. Food security, sustainability, and progressive opportunity are identified as three core prime public values. Instrumental values in this context consist of two major value categories: (1) intra-organizational values and (2) inter-and ultra-organizational values. Furthermore, this study applies public value failure criteria to examine success or failure of public values in this context. U.S. Food banks do contribute to the success of public sphere, progressive opportunity, sustainability and food security. However, the practice of U.S. food banks also lead to the failure of food security in some conditions. This study develops a new public value failure criterion based on the inherent limitations of charitable service providers. Main findings, contributions, and future directions are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017