Matching Items (3)

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Can You Mix It? An Analysis of Bitcoin Mixers

Description

Third-party mixers are used to heighten the anonymity of Bitcoin users. The mixing techniques implemented by these tools are often untraceable on the blockchain, making them appealing to money launderers. This research aims to analyze mixers currently available on the

Third-party mixers are used to heighten the anonymity of Bitcoin users. The mixing techniques implemented by these tools are often untraceable on the blockchain, making them appealing to money launderers. This research aims to analyze mixers currently available on the deep web. In addition, an in-depth case study is done on an open-source bitcoin mixer known as Penguin Mixer. A local version of Penguin Mixer was used to visualize mixer behavior under specific scenarios. This study could lead to the identification of vulnerabilities in mixing tools and detection of these tools on the blockchain.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-12

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Anonymity protection and access control in mobile network environment

Description

Wireless communication technologies have been playing an important role in modern society. Due to its inherent mobility property, wireless networks are more vulnerable to passive attacks than traditional wired networks. Anonymity, as an important issue in mobile network environment, serves

Wireless communication technologies have been playing an important role in modern society. Due to its inherent mobility property, wireless networks are more vulnerable to passive attacks than traditional wired networks. Anonymity, as an important issue in mobile network environment, serves as the first topic that leads to all the research work presented in this manuscript. Specifically, anonymity issue in Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANETs) is discussed with details as the first section of research.

To thoroughly study on this topic, the presented work approaches it from an attacker's perspective. Under a perfect scenario, all the traffic in a targeted MANET exhibits the communication relations to a passive attacker. However, localization errors pose a significant influence on the accuracy of the derived communication patterns. To handle such issue, a new scheme is proposed to generate super nodes, which represent the activities of user groups in the target MANET. This scheme also helps reduce the scale of monitoring work by grouping users based on their behaviors.

The first part of work on anonymity in MANET leads to the thought on its major cause. The link-based communication pattern is a key contributor to the success of the traffic analysis attack. A natural way to circumvent such issue is to use link-less approaches. Information Centric Networking (ICN) is a typical instance of such kind. Its communication pattern is able to overcome the anonymity issue with MANET. However, it also comes with its own shortcomings. One of them is access control enforcement. To tackle this issue, a new naming scheme for contents transmitted in ICN networks is presented. This scheme is based on a new Attribute-Based Encryption (ABE) algorithm. It enforces access control in ICN with minimum requirements on additional network components.

Following the research work on ABE, an important function, delegation, exhibits a potential security issue. In traditional ABE schemes, Ciphertext-Policy ABE (CP-ABE), a user is able to generate a subset of authentic attribute key components for other users using delegation function. This capability is not monitored or controlled by the trusted third party (TTP) in the cryptosystem. A direct threat caused from this issue is that any user may intentionally or unintentionally lower the standards for attribute assignments. Unauthorized users/attackers may be able to obtain their desired attributes through a delegation party instead of directly from the TTP. As the third part of work presented in this manuscript, a three-level delegation restriction architecture is proposed. Furthermore, a delegation restriction scheme following this architecture is also presented. This scheme allows the TTP to have full control on the delegation function of all its direct users.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Bitcoin Mixers (But Were Afraid to Ask)

Description

The lack of fungibility in Bitcoin has forced its userbase to seek out tools that can heighten their anonymity. Third-party Bitcoin mixers utilize obfuscation techniques to protect participants from blockchain analysis. In recent years, various centralized and decentralized Bitcoin mixing

The lack of fungibility in Bitcoin has forced its userbase to seek out tools that can heighten their anonymity. Third-party Bitcoin mixers utilize obfuscation techniques to protect participants from blockchain analysis. In recent years, various centralized and decentralized Bitcoin mixing implementations have been proposed in academic literature. Although these methods depict a threat-free environment for users to preserve their anonymity, public Bitcoin mixers continue to be associated with theft and poor implementation.

This research explores the public Bitcoin mixer ecosystem to identify if today's mixing services have adopted academically proposed solutions. This is done through real-world interactions with publicly available mixers to analyze both implementation and resistance to common threats in the mixing landscape. First, proposed decentralized and centralized mixing protocols found in literature are outlined. Then, data is presented from 19 publicly announced mixing services available on the deep web and clearnet. The services are categorized based on popularity with the Bitcoin community and experiments are conducted on five public mixing services: ChipMixer, MixTum, Bitcoin Mixer, CryptoMixer, and Sudoku Wallet.

The results of the experiments highlight a clear gap between public and proposed Bitcoin mixers in both implementation and security. Today's mixing services focus on presenting users with a false sense of control to gain their trust rather then employing secure mixing techniques. As a result, the five selected services lack implementation of academically proposed techniques and display poor resistance to common mixer-related threats.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020