Matching Items (5)

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K-12, Title I Education: School Choice Institutions, Experimental Programs, and Policies

Description

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, Title I \u2014 also known as "Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged," is a "[federal] program [that] provides financial assistance through

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, Title I \u2014 also known as "Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged," is a "[federal] program [that] provides financial assistance through state educational agencies (SEAs) to local educational agencies (LEAs) and public schools with high numbers or percentages of poor children to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic content and student academic achievement standards," (NCES, 2016.) Title I has existed since the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, and continues to be reauthorized; most recently, Title I was included in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015, (Education Week, 2015). Although Title I's structure has remained much the same over the years, the education market has not, which impacts Title I's future. For example, the number of public and state-accredited schools benefiting from Title I is growing, mainly because of concerns about an increasing number of at-risk youth struggling to meet state and federal academic standards every year. In order to support this growing need, the Title I budget increases year-to-year (U.S. Department of Education, 2004). Furthermore, the Title I program is often criticized based on its effectiveness in assisting LEAs to elevate at-risk youth to meet U.S. academic standards. Because of Title I's sheer size, being the largest federal fund to K-12 education, one can critique Title I's effectiveness in a few ways. For example, school choice institutions, experimental programs, and policies often challenge Title I's formula structure. School choice essentially encourages a parent and/or child to choose the academic institution they wish to affiliate with (Sunderman, 2014). That said, some school choice entities critique the distribution of Title I, because youth that benefit from certain Title I services usually attend poor and/or underperforming schools \u2014 which often lack resources and K-12, Title I Education: School Choice Institutions, Experimental Programs, and Policies 5 educational opportunities - hence school choice seeks to shift the distribution of Title I funds away from poor schools and more towards the individual student to decide their school of choice, (Sunderman, 2014). This thesis reviews the research on Title I's structure, affiliated school choice institutions, experimental programs, and polices; the validity of the underlying assumptions of the school choice critique of Title I; in addition, a school choice policy idea is proposed by the author, which is a more feasible alternative to the ineffective Title I Portability proposal.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Analysis of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and its Reauthorizations: The Subsequent Impact on Schools and Students

Description

This research paper aims to analyze the intricacies of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as well as its reauthorizations, primarily No Child Left Behind (NCLB) with a brief

This research paper aims to analyze the intricacies of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as well as its reauthorizations, primarily No Child Left Behind (NCLB) with a brief look at the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Most attention will be placed on Title I of each piece of legislation. Accompanying the analysis will be insight and data examining the varied levels of success for each piece of legislation aimed at minimizing the achievement gap. The data will highlight graduation rates, test scores, dropout rates, adult literacy rates, school enrollment, etc. The research paper will analyze these items on a national scale, then it will direct its attention to Arizona schools. Charter schools will not be analyzed within the scope of this research paper. In exploring these details in terms of a specific state since ESEA's inception, the research paper hopes to better examine the effects of ESEA and perhaps suggest parallels to states nationwide. Since there are so many diverse factors in determining student and school success, it would be unwise to make concrete claims about these figures and whether they prove ESEA was a success or failure. However, the purpose of providing this data is to suggest possible relationships between these federal initiatives and student success. Furthermore, as a prior student and current teacher at a Title I school in Arizona, the author acknowledges that there is potential for bias and the perspective provided in this research paper may differ from that of the reader.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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How Title I Schools Encourage Graduation: Graduation Rates in Title I Schools and Programs Offered

Description

The purpose of this study was to bring new information to the field of education research on<br/>graduation rates and school programming. Research on graduation rates and the effects of school<br/>programs

The purpose of this study was to bring new information to the field of education research on<br/>graduation rates and school programming. Research on graduation rates and the effects of school<br/>programs exist, however there is not an abundance of research aimed specifically at Title I high<br/>schools. The goal was to find what school characteristics might impact graduation rates in this<br/>population. The thesis focused on Title I high schools in the Phoenix Union District with a<br/>graduating 2019 class of at least 250 students. This limited the effect of variability (school size,<br/>location, socioeconomic status). To research this topic, school characteristics were selected<br/>including course rigor, mentor programs, and college prep programs, as well as specific schools.<br/>To obtain the information, multiple sources were used including the Arizona Department of<br/>Education website, school websites, and school administrators/staff. The research revealed that<br/>the effect of course rigor, college prep programs, and mentorship on graduation rates in Phoenix<br/>Union High Schools is not apparent. Further research should be conducted into other possible<br/>causes for the gaps in graduation rates between the Title I high schools in this district. Future<br/>research on ELL students and programs in the Phoenix Union district and their effectiveness or<br/>lack thereof is also recommended. The research shows that this large demographic negatively<br/>correlates with the overall graduation rates at the six schools researched.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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How Title I Schools Encourage Graduation: Graduation Rates in Title I Schools and Programs Offered

Description

The purpose of this study was to bring new information to the field of education research on graduation rates and school programming. Research on graduation rates and the effects of

The purpose of this study was to bring new information to the field of education research on graduation rates and school programming. Research on graduation rates and the effects of school programs exist, however there is not an abundance of research aimed specifically at Title I high schools. The goal was to find what school characteristics might impact graduation rates in this population. The thesis focused on Title I high schools in the Phoenix Union District with a graduating 2019 class of at least 250 students. This limited the effect of variability (school size, location, socioeconomic status). To research this topic, school characteristics were selected including course rigor, mentor programs, and college prep programs, as well as specific schools. To obtain the information, multiple sources were used including the Arizona Department of Education website, school websites, and school administrators/staff. The research revealed that the effect of course rigor, college prep programs, and mentorship on graduation rates in Phoenix Union High Schools is not apparent. Further research should be conducted into other possible causes for the gaps in graduation rates between the Title I high schools in this district. Future research on ELL students and programs in the Phoenix Union district and their effectiveness or lack thereof is also recommended. The research shows that this large demographic negatively correlates with the overall graduation rates at the six schools researched.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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A Demographic Analysis of Flora Thew Elementary School: An Investigation of Title I Elementary Schools and Minority Student Education

Description

Flora Thew Elementary School is a Title I elementary school in the Tempe Elementary School District. The student body is predominantly Hispanic with an additional large portion of African American

Flora Thew Elementary School is a Title I elementary school in the Tempe Elementary School District. The student body is predominantly Hispanic with an additional large portion of African American students, all coming from low-income backgrounds. The purpose of this project was to investigate the efficacy of American education in these groups of students as well as a personal analysis of the organization, Arizona Mentor Society, that serves to promote student success. The investigation found that while the American education system already fails these students in many ways, the elementary school itself propagates this failure in a faculty body that is unfamiliar with the culture of their student body. Solutions to this problem would include the diversification of the teacher workforce, more strict but inclusive training of educators, and changes in the assessment of these students.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05