Matching Items (7)

Generating a Format for Video News Online: State Press Weekly

Description

The format for news has been in a state of evolution since it was introduced to the online platform. Given this digital space for creative freedom, some journalists have ventured

The format for news has been in a state of evolution since it was introduced to the online platform. Given this digital space for creative freedom, some journalists have ventured towards producing original video content specifically for online. The issue that arises with this content is that there is no widely accepted, perceivable structure for the format, unlike other news mediums (i.e.- print journalism, broadcast journalism). This thesis takes an in-depth look at an online video news experiment conducted at Arizona State University's student news organization, the State Press, with the intention to understand the viability of the project and online video news as a whole and to offer a set of guidelines that could direct a student media organization in the creation of such content.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Effectiveness of ASU Wellness' Sexual Violence Prevention Initiatives

Description

Sexual violence is a serious issue, particularly on college campuses, and many sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption. Universities have begun implementing sexual violence prevention programs on their

Sexual violence is a serious issue, particularly on college campuses, and many sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption. Universities have begun implementing sexual violence prevention programs on their campuses, but many do not examine their programs to determine if they are actually effective in increasing students' knowledge on consent and therefore reducing rates of sexual violence on their campuses. This study examines a sexual violence prevention program at Arizona State University called Consent 101, given by the ASU Wellness Department. This research seeks to determine if attending the presentation increases students' knowledge about the conditions of consent; specifically, if students are more likely to correctly answer a question regarding sobriety and consent after viewing the presentation. The hypothesis is that attending the Consent 101 presentation increases the likelihood that students will perceive that people must be sober in order to consent to sexual activities. A survey was used to test students' knowledge about consent and sexual violence, as well as their attitudes. Some students took the survey prior to attending the presentation while others took it after, allowing the groups to be compared to determine effectiveness. This study specifically focuses on whether students correctly choose true, incorrectly choose false, or choose don't know when given the statement "people must be sober in order to give valid consent to sex". There were 685 participants in the study. The "before" group contained 59% of the total participants, while the "after" group contained 41%. In the before group, 87.1% correctly answered true, 6.43% incorrectly answered false, and 6.18% answered don't know. In the after group, 85.71% answered true, 12.09% answered false, and 2.13% answered don't know. The results were significant and the hypothesis was not supported, meaning students were more likely to incorrectly answer the question after the presentation than before. There are multiple explanations for why this was found, including: different pre- and post-groups, misinterpreting the question and resistance to consent education. Ideas for future research and ways to increase effectiveness are provided.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Brand Perceptions Across University Athletes and Non-Athletes

Description

I use Arizona State University's rebranding initiative with Nike as a starting point for examining how partnerships between elite brands and universities affect different types of students. I draw from

I use Arizona State University's rebranding initiative with Nike as a starting point for examining how partnerships between elite brands and universities affect different types of students. I draw from literature on self-completion theory and identity salience to suggest that there are differences between athletes and non-athletes in how they believe elite sportswear products may affect their athletic performance. I propose that athletes feel more "complete" than non-athletes because they are more proficient in their respective sport. As such, non-athletes are more likely to use sportswear products (Nike) to become more proficient in athletics and have stronger beliefs that elite sportswear products will help them arrive at their goals. I also propose and find that students who feel that ASU plays an important part of their life perceive even greater performance boosts from using Nike products. These findings suggest that particular attention should be paid to the athletes and non-athletes in initiatives that link specific institutions and organizations to performance brands.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012-12

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Arizona University Students’ Perceptions of COVID-19

Description

This study looked at student’s perceptions of COVID-19 and differences in how universities handled COVID-19. It aimed to assess what measures made students feel safe and were the most effective

This study looked at student’s perceptions of COVID-19 and differences in how universities handled COVID-19. It aimed to assess what measures made students feel safe and were the most effective in lessening spread. A risk-perception survey scored feelings of safety/risk, and semi-structured interviews provided context. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis showed mixed opinions on university measures, and interviews identified wearing masks, social distancing, isolating, and limiting social contacts as measures that were effective in curbing spread.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

The State of Startups: A Student Perspective

Description

This thesis will bring together students to engage in entrepreneurship by finding, measuring and sharing strategic market opportunities. From a student’s perspective, it will take a deep dive into the

This thesis will bring together students to engage in entrepreneurship by finding, measuring and sharing strategic market opportunities. From a student’s perspective, it will take a deep dive into the world of startup ecosystems, markets and trends utilizing both qualitative and quantitative market research techniques. The information gathered has been curated into a productive, meaningful manner, through a report titled “The State of Startups: A Student Perspective.” <br/>The first key theme of this thesis is that market intelligence can be a powerful tool. The second key theme is the power of knowledge implementation towards competitive strategies. The first section of the thesis will focus on identifying and understanding the current “startup” landscape as a basis on which to build strategic and impactful business decisions. This will be accomplished as the team conducts a landscape analysis focused on the student perspective of the student-based North American “entrepreneurial” ecosystem. The second section of the thesis will focus specifically on the personal experiences of student startup founders. This will be accomplished through the analysis of interviews with founders of the startups researched from the first section of the thesis. This will provide us with a direct insight into the student perspective of the student-based North American “entrepreneurial” ecosystem.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Transforming Reputation in Higher Education

Description

There are over 4,000 higher education institutions in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. With a variety of options at an applicant’s disposal, the competition for

There are over 4,000 higher education institutions in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. With a variety of options at an applicant’s disposal, the competition for institutions to attract their desired student body can be fierce. Some factors many consider when searching for the perfect college are its reputation and brand. Increasingly, universities have chosen to engage in marketing and branding techniques once reserved for corporations. According to a report by the Santa Clara Consulting Group, “a university is no longer just an institution of higher learning but also a business.” In coordination with this growing trend, institutions have been propelled to undergo some extent of a transformation to achieve their goals. This paper examines three institutions representing different higher education categories that have undergone or are currently undergoing some extent of a reputational shift. Looking at a large public university, an Ivy League institution and a liberal arts college, the research explores the various communications efforts made by each institution and how they compare. In some cases, the communications department is an integral component of the shift, while sometimes it provides mostly auxiliary support. Ultimately, this research hopes to provide insight into the following questions: what actions can an institution’s communications department take to help strengthen its reputation and grow its brand; and how do these strategies compare among various types of institutions?

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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It's not that simple: a complex journey of an MFA applied project

Description

It’s Not That Simple: A Complex Journey of an MFA Applied Project discusses the experience of graduate student, Molly W. Schenck. Schenck’s applied project, It’s Not That Simple, was an

It’s Not That Simple: A Complex Journey of an MFA Applied Project discusses the experience of graduate student, Molly W. Schenck. Schenck’s applied project, It’s Not That Simple, was an interdisciplinary dance theatre performance piece that challenges rape culture on college campuses. While the focus of the applied project was this performance, it was the obstacles and highlights that were related to the project that made the journey memorable. This paper will discuss the history and evolution of It’s Not That Simple, the creative process, the research, the trajectory of the project, and reflections on the journey.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016