Matching Items (7)

Bridging the Human-Animal Gap: the Intersection of Sexism, Racism, and Speciesism

Description

Understanding the connection between different forms of oppression is relevant both in the political movement for animal rights and the political movements for social justice and human equality. I argue

Understanding the connection between different forms of oppression is relevant both in the political movement for animal rights and the political movements for social justice and human equality. I argue that sexism, racism, and speciesism intersect in such a way that each form of oppression depends on and mutually reinforces the others. In the struggle for justice, inequalities cannot be compartmentalized and the approach cannot be single issue because leaving groups behind means leaving the oppressive systems intact, perpetuating all forms of oppression, and undermining the efforts of each campaign. By recognizing sexism, racism, and speciesism as inextricably linked, each movement can be made more successful by approaching inequality as a bundled political problem instead of as distinct and independent forms of injustice.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Gender Norms, Sexism, and Self-Esteem in College Students

Description

This study reports on the interrelations among several domains of gender typing (e.g., masculinity, sexualization, and sexism) as well as their relationships to self-esteem. A group of undergraduates (113 women

This study reports on the interrelations among several domains of gender typing (e.g., masculinity, sexualization, and sexism) as well as their relationships to self-esteem. A group of undergraduates (113 women and 54 men) between the ages of 18-42 were administered online questionnaires asking them about masculinity beliefs, internalized sexualization, sexist beliefs, and self-esteem. A positive relationship was found between masculinity beliefs and hostile sexism. Also, a positive relationship was found between sexualization through self-compromise and self-esteem. These findings differ from relationships found in adolescence, which suggests a developmental change that affects these beliefs in young adults. Implications for understanding gender development in emerging adults are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

Gender Disparities in the Healthcare Field

Description

After volunteering at a clinic in Guatemala and seeing the sexism that is so engrained into their culture, I decided to take a look at the U.S. healthcare system. I

After volunteering at a clinic in Guatemala and seeing the sexism that is so engrained into their culture, I decided to take a look at the U.S. healthcare system. I wanted to uncover the stereotypes, statistics and gender and societal norms that are present in our culture. I first started with the application process and the acceptance rates to medical school. I discovered that men are accepted to medical school at higher rates than women unless that man is deemed dangerous or foreign. I then moved on to the environment in medical school. Many women are subjected to snide comments or “bro talk” made to make them feel inferior. Men always graduate at higher rates than women, which could be because of the unwelcoming environment in medical school or the lack of female faculty chairs or mentors. After medical school, a new doctor must choose a specialty. Men gravitate towards specialties that focus on surgical work and large sums of money. Women tend to choose specialties that require a more soothing and caring environment. Women are more likely to pick specialties where there is a higher proportion of female residents. After specialties, I then explored the life of a doctor. Slightly over half of all doctors in the workforce are men and they make an average of $78,288 more per year than female physicians. Women are discriminated against if they become pregnant on the job and they are more likely to develop mental health issues. Female physicians are overall, more compassionate, rule abiding and patient-focused than their male counterparts but are not receiving the acknowledgments that they deserve. After delving into the U.S. healthcare system, I have realized that sexism in the workforce is blatantly apparent and is one of the outcomes of our patriarchal society. The only way we can make a change is to acknowledge the problem and come together as a society to combat the issue.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Women in TV Journalism

Description

In this research paper I combine statistics from various reports and studies with around 20 different interviews with female journalists to understand how women are faring in national and local

In this research paper I combine statistics from various reports and studies with around 20 different interviews with female journalists to understand how women are faring in national and local television newsrooms in 2019. I explore issues such as the pay gap, sexual assault, the importance of appearance, balancing work and family life and obstacles that women of color uniquely face. I spoke with women from various cultural backgrounds, experience levels, and in different positions within their newsrooms. Through my scholarly research and 19 interviews with women who either currently work at NBC News in New York City and women who currently or recently worked at 12News, the NBC affiliate in Phoenix, I conclude they share similar stories of oppression, sexism and issues. However, women have made more progress in local markets and have more opportunities when compared to the national level. I also explore reasons for why this disparity is happening and why local newsrooms seem to have more women represented through their on-air talent than national newsrooms do. One of the reasons I concluded for this include, how local newsrooms have a better understanding of their audience members thus making them more able to reflect their talent to their diverse audience. Another factor that might play a role in this disparity includes, the historical factor and societal norm of seeing men in higher positions and authoritative roles, such as being an anchor, at the network level. Lastly, the idea of how family and having children impacts women’s careers more than men. This can lead to less women pursuing a job at the network since they must spend time raising a family and have the ability and flexibility to do that easier at the local level. Overall, I focused on the barriers, obstacles and stories these women have had throughout their careers all while looking at it from both a local perspective and a national one.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Odd occupation: effects of counter-stereotypical images on sexist beliefs

Description

The advertising industry plays a crucial role in how ideals and norms are established in United States society. Recent work is revealing the negative impact advertisements can have on

The advertising industry plays a crucial role in how ideals and norms are established in United States society. Recent work is revealing the negative impact advertisements can have on self-esteem and self-image, especially for women. Unrealistic body-types, often created through photo editing, continue to contribute to eating and emotional disorders. Such fabricated ideals hinder the progress of social and economic justice for women. This exploratory study investigates whether images of women in traditionally male-dominated roles can weaken sexist attitudes and whether less sexism and highly sexist groups differ in image processing. Participants who scored high or low on the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory were exposed to a set of images of females in the female-dominated occupation of waitress and females in the male-dominated occupation of construction while measuring their neural activity using EEG. Participants complete the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory before and after the experiment. P3 oddball effects are measured for each participant with the hypothesis that the High Sexism group will view female construction workers with a higher oddball effect than the low sexism group. With 38 participants, there is a significant difference between the groups with individuals scoring low on the ASI showing a greater difference between the waitress and construction worker images compared to individuals scoring high on the ASI. Further, exposure to these images did not significantly reduce ASI scores in either group.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Female Microaggressions Scale (FeMS): A Comprehensive Sexism Scale

Description

Overt forms of sexism have become less frequent (Swim Hyers, Cohen & Ferguson, 2001; Sue & Capodilupo, 2008). Nonetheless, scholars contend that sexism is still pervasive but often manifests as

Overt forms of sexism have become less frequent (Swim Hyers, Cohen & Ferguson, 2001; Sue & Capodilupo, 2008). Nonetheless, scholars contend that sexism is still pervasive but often manifests as female microaggressions, which have been defined as often subtle, covert forms of gender discrimination (Capodilupo et al., 2010). Extant sexism scales fail to capture female microaggresions, limiting understanding of the correlates and consequences of women’s experiences of gender discrimination. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to develop the Female Microaggressions Scale (FeMS) based on an existing theoretical taxonomy and content analysis of social media data, which identifies diverse forms of sexism. Two separate studies were conducted for exploratory factor analysis (N = 582) and confirmatory factor analysis (N = 325). Exploratory factor analyses supported an eight-factor, correlated structure and confirmatory factor analyses supported a bifactor model, with eight specific factors and one general FeMS factor. Overall, reliability and validity of the FeMS (general FeMS and subscales) were mostly supported in the two present samples of diverse women. The FeMS’ subscales and body surveillance were significantly positively correlated. Results regarding correlations between the FeMS subscales and anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction were mixed. The FeMS (general FeMS) was significantly positively correlated with anxiety, body surveillance, and another measure of sexism but not depression or life satisfaction. Furthermore, the FeMS (general FeMS) explained variance in anxiety and body surveillance (but not depression, self-esteem, or life satisfaction) above and beyond that explained by an existing sexism measure and explained variance in anxiety and depression (but not self-esteem) above and beyond that explained by neuroticism. Implications for future research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Deviant bodies resisting online: examining the intersecting realities of women of color in Xbox Live

Description

Employing qualitative methods and drawing from an intersectional framework which focuses on the multiple identities we all embody, this dissertation focuses on oppressions and resistance strategies employed by women of

Employing qualitative methods and drawing from an intersectional framework which focuses on the multiple identities we all embody, this dissertation focuses on oppressions and resistance strategies employed by women of color in Xbox live, an online gaming community. Ethnographic observations and narrative interviewing reveal that women of color, as deviants within the space, face intersecting oppressions in gaming as in life outside the gaming world. They are linguistically profiled within the space based off of how they sound. They have responded with various strategies to combat the discrimination they experience. Some segregate themselves from the larger gaming population and many refuse to purchase games that depict women in a hyper-sexualized manner or that present people of color stereotypically. For others, the solution is to "sit-in" on games and disrupt game flow by 'player-killing' or engage in other 'griefing' activities. I analyze this behavior in the context of Black feminist consciousness and resistance and uncover that these methods are similar to women who employ resistance strategies for survival within the real world.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011