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Homeric Correspondences and Irish Nationalism in Joyce's "Cyclops"

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James Joyce’s novel Ulysses has been analyzed extensively for decades, and the volume of analyses which are still being produced today indicates that we still haven’t scratched the surface of

James Joyce’s novel Ulysses has been analyzed extensively for decades, and the volume of analyses which are still being produced today indicates that we still haven’t scratched the surface of fully understanding all of the novel’s mysteries. This project contributes to these efforts by taking a deeper look into two of the novel’s central aspects, its numerous correspondences to Homer’s The Odyssey and its criticism and subversion of traditional Irish values, and examining how they may be connected to one another. Looking specifically at the “Cyclops” episode of Ulysses, which is commonly accepted as Joyce’s most biting criticism of extreme Irish nationalism in the novel, the specific correspondences to The Odyssey with regard to the episode’s structure, plot, characters, and themes are identified. Through an analysis of how these correspondences are presented in the episode, critical divergences in how the two works portray their characters and common themes are revealed. The results of this analysis emphasize the importance of looking at Joyce’s novel as a modernist take on the traditional Homeric epic, suggesting that it is largely through these divergences that Joyce elucidates much of the underlying meaning of the episode. The subversion of Homeric themes and characters is shown to be closely connected with the subversion of Irish cultural ideals, further driving Joyce’s criticism of these ideals as outmoded. The perspective gained by analyzing the episode in this context also has quite a bit of relevance to some of the more troubling aspects of present-day western society, supporting the persistent importance of Joyce’s novel as a critical examination of humanity as a whole.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Burkina Faso Hospital Microgrid Case Study

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This paper analyzes Burkina Faso’s Souro Sanou University Hospital Center’s energy needs and discusses whether or not solar panels are a good investment. This paper also discusses a way to

This paper analyzes Burkina Faso’s Souro Sanou University Hospital Center’s energy needs and discusses whether or not solar panels are a good investment. This paper also discusses a way to limit the damage caused by power outages. The hospital has a history of problems with power outages; in the summer they have power outages every other day lasting between one to four hours, and in the rainy season they have outages once every other week lasting the same amount of time.
The first step in this analysis was collecting relevant data which includes: location, electricity rates, energy consumption, and existing assets. The data was entered into a program called HOMER. HOMER is a program which analyzes an electrical system and determines the best configuration and usage of assets to get the lowest levelized cost of energy (LCOE). In HOMER, five different analyses were performed. They reviewed the hospital’s energy usage over 25 years: the current situation, one of the current situation with added solar panels, and another where the solar panels have single axis tracking. The other two analyses created incentives to have more solar panels, one situation with net metering, and one with a sellback rate of 0.03 $/kWh. The result of the analysis concluded that the ideal situation would have solar panels with a capacity of 300 kW, and the LCOE in this situation will be 0.153 $/kWh. The analysis shows that investing in solar panels will save the hospital approximately $65,500 per year, but the initial investment of $910,000 only allows for a total savings of $61,253 over the life of the project. The analysis also shows that if the electricity company, Sonabel, eventually buys back electricity then net metering would be more profitable than reselling electricity for the hospital.
Solar panels will help the hospital save money over time, but they will not stop power outages from happening at the hospital. For the outages to stop affecting the hospital’s operations they will have to invest in an uninterrupted power supply (UPS). The UPS will power the hospital for the time between when the power goes out and when their generators are turning on which makes it an essential investment. This will stop outages from affecting the hospital, and if the power goes out during the day then the solar panels can help supplement the energy production which will take some of the strain from their generators.
The results of this study will be sent to officials at the hospital and they can decide if the large initial investment justifies the savings. If the solar panels and UPS can save one life, then maybe the large initial investment is worth it.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05